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  • Atlanta 12 String
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Atlanta 12 String


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Audio CD, February 25, 1992
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (February 25, 1992)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Atlantic
  • ASIN: B000002ITB
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #117,543 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Kill It Kid
2. The Razor Ball
3. Little Delia
4. Broke Down Engine Blues
5. Dying Crapshooter's Blues
6. Pinietope's Boogie Woogie
7. Blues Around Midnight
8. Last Dime Blues
9. On The Cooling Board
10. Motherless Children Have A Hard Time
11. I Got To Cross The River Jordan
12. You Got To Die
13. Aint't It Grand To Live A Christian
14. Pearly Gates
15. Soon This Morning

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

(1949 'Atlantic') (44:50/15) Blues & Ragtime Guitar in great sound quality.

Amazon.com

Atlantic's short-lived Blues Originals series brought forth some real gems: not just Professor Longhair's New Orleans Piano, but this 1949 session by singer-guitarist McTell. What Bob Dylan heard in McTell, the title subject of one of his most fabled songs, is both easy and hard to catch, but there's something eerie in the almost cheerful delivery of songs such as "Dying Crapshooter's Blues." A grand album that forms yet another facet of the label's gemlike catalog. --Rickey Wright

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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This disc was very well done, especially considering the recording equipment available at the time.
Adam A. Wanderer
The sound is great compared to his 30's era recordings, yet his unmistakeable voice and 12-string playing style are every bit as engaging as any he ever recorded.
hypnovision
This recording is an essential in any blues lover's collection and may possibly be the best country blues recording of all time.
Jay Kiiha

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 46 people found the following review helpful By Philip Welsh on January 17, 2000
Format: Audio CD
I hesitate to call this an "album" because McTell never recorded albums, he recorded sides; but this work stands out so sharply against the two other major periods of his recordings -- the original 20s and 30s sides, and then the "last session" -- what's so amazing about these sessions here is that McTell hadn't been "rediscovered" like so many of the other old bluesman who only a scant few years later would be being taken into the false (though hopefully renumerative) milieu of folk/blues revivalists -- I don't know why this seems to mark these recordings as "purer" than so many others in the 60s, but they are like nothing else. Modern (for the 50s) recording techniques mean a sonic depth which his 20s/30s recordings couldn't have hoped to compete with -- yet unlike the "Last Session," Blind Willie is at the height of his powers. A man, his voice, and a his 12-string. The version fo "Dying Crapshooter's Blues" is peerless, and the version of "Delia" just gut-wrenching -- World-Gone-Wrong-era Bobby Dylan's constant acknowledgement of McTell as a constant wellspring of inspiration (for some of Dylan's darkest material) makes much more sense after this album. Truly one of my own favorites of all time.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Jay Kiiha on February 9, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Between the Regal Sessions and these Atlantic Recordings, Blind Willie McTell was at the height of his powers. Although some might disagree, McTell was, I think, the best blues interpretivist of his era. McTell could take an old chestnut like "Last Dime Blues" and rework it into his own signature material. With just a simple break in his voice McTell can bring you to tears.
If you are a fan of American Roots music, you owe it to yourself to purchase these Atlantic Sessions. This recording is an essential in any blues lover's collection and may possibly be the best country blues recording of all time.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By hypnovision on June 19, 2001
Format: Audio CD
It's hard in a way to believe that this disc was recorded in the late 1940's. It sounds like it could have been recorded yesterday and Willie McTell is sitting right there in the room with you. Thank goodness there were some music lovers at Atlantic who captured these great performances.
For anyone who has never owned a Blind Willie McTell record, this is the one I would recommend starting with. The sound is great compared to his 30's era recordings, yet his unmistakeable voice and 12-string playing style are every bit as engaging as any he ever recorded.
I agree with another reviewer that "Dying Crapshooter's Blues" alone is worth the price of admission. In my humble opinion, it is one of the five greatest blues songs ever recorded. Not only does the song contain many of the great blues themes (death, hard-living, lost love), it also captures the milieu of the bluesman's lifestyle (cathouses, deadly policemen, loaded dice); and it's all pulled off with a mixture of humor and pathos that draws you into the song's world.
"Dying Craphsooter's Blues" and other great performances on this disc make it an essential album in any blues/folk collection and a wonderful entree into the repertoire of this one-of-a-kind performer.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Andrew T. Olson on March 11, 2001
Format: Audio CD
In 1948, the year the tracks included on "Atlanta Telve String" were recorded, lone wolf bluesmen weren't exactly the hippest thing in music. Most of the blues records being released and sold during that time featured blues shouters and crooners backed up by horn or piano driven proto R&B combos. Thus, it is a minor miracle that the fledgeling Atlantic label chose to cut a session's worth of material by Blind Willie McTell. Astute businessmen who surely must have realized the limited marketbility of these tracks, the brothers Ehrtegun were clearly either fans of McTell's clasic 20's & 30's sides or were blown away by his audition and just couldn't pass up the opportunity to record him. At any rate, the performances cut during McTell's Atlantic session constitute some of the finest solo blues ever laid to wax. These tracks reflect McTell's highly individualistic style, which was neither entirely urban nor country, nor a product of any particular geographical region. Although folkie academic types like to place him in the artificially concocted "Piedmont Blues" school, McTell was widely traveled and was influenced by all kinds of music. Revelations from this session include his peformances of "Motherless Children," "You Got To Die," and several other gospel blues that betray McTell's musical debt to the equally idiosyncratic (and equally visually impaired)Texan Blind Willie Johnson. More representative of McTell's earlier work are the boisterous ragtime numbers "Kill It Kid" and "Razor Ball"-the only two performances form the session released as singles. The two best performances form the session, however are "Little Delia" and "Dying Crapshooter's Blues.Read more ›
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 23, 2004
Format: Audio CD
I started llike everyone...Led Zep, Clapton, Rolling Stones,etc. Then i started to get complicated with jazz and prog rock. 20 years passed. When i got to free jazz and avant garde music i felt like i had reached a peak in musical investigation. Now i have come full circle to the beginning...and what a joy it is! Charlie Patton, Skip james, Muddy Waters, Blind Jefferson, Beefheart, Howilin Wolf, Robert Johnson, John Hurt, Leroy Carr, Son House and others are all worth checking out. But Blind Willie Mctell can really hit the soft spot in your soul if you are a real music lover. This and his early stuff are guranteed to send shivers up your spine. Music that seems simple in appearance...but, if you are willing to open up, you will be amazed at the richness of emotions this music can transmit. And this is a joy specially because of the good sound and choice of songs. Highly recommended to all those who love music and blues influenced music.
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