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74 of 77 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Definative Atlantis
This is the book that started it all, written a century ago by a man as strange and dynamic as his story. Every fantastical image of a sunken paradise, or heated dispute about it's existence and location, all started with these pages.
The origin of all Atlantis-hype, this book similarly starts with the origin of the concept itself. Donnely includes a translation of...
Published on December 26, 2000 by auarchitect

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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Do not buy this edition
This edition is full of typos and useless new age advertising for websites etc... I could not even read it because it was so annoying. Everywhere in the book the word "he" is transposed/replaced with the word "be" for some unknown reason, not to mention other typos and errors. The editor, or whoever proofread this, must be blind! There is no way this book should be...
Published on October 18, 2009 by Homo Sapiens


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74 of 77 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Definative Atlantis, December 26, 2000
This is the book that started it all, written a century ago by a man as strange and dynamic as his story. Every fantastical image of a sunken paradise, or heated dispute about it's existence and location, all started with these pages.
The origin of all Atlantis-hype, this book similarly starts with the origin of the concept itself. Donnely includes a translation of Plato's story that all Atlantean research goes back too. This was the most interesting part of the book, just hearing the first account all discussion and contemplation aside. It is also the most integral part of the book, since out of it comes all of Donnely's extrapolation.
The basic point of the rest of the book is to try to show that 1) Atlantis could have existed and disappeared geologically ages ago, and then furthermore 2) to explain Atlantis's affect on the rest of human history. Here, his attempts are the most interesting, and, often, the most ridiculous. Generally speaking though, he does state his case scientifically, and in most cases, rather believably.
The only glaring faults are his mistranslation of the original Plato, placing Atlantis most likely in the wrong area, and how sometimes he takes some rather huge leaps to justify his points. But hey, he wrote it 100 years ago and still manages to produce an intriguing study into the Atlantean question, without the aids of more advanced technologies.
Either way, it's a very interesting book, and whether you believe in Atlantis or not, I'm sure it will give you a lot to think about, which was indeed Donnely's purpose in the first place. I recommend it to any inquisitive mind.
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55 of 65 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Generating 19th C. Work Flawed Only by Limited Knowledge, September 28, 1999
Ignatius Donnelly's groundbreaking work suffers only from his
mis-reading of Plato as to the site of Atlantis. Donnelly's
translation of the Greek led to his placement of Atlantis as
"opposed to the Pillars of Hercules (Straits of Gibraltar)"
rather than "across" from the straits as related in Sir
Desmond Lee's definitive translation (Desmond Lee was knighted in 1961
for his work in translating Plato). Thus Donnelly, unfortunately to be
followed by scores of others, posited Atlantis as a sunken island in
the Atlantic (geologically unsustainable), rather than as an
island-continent across the Atlantic (the Americas)whose civilization
was destroyed but whose "bare-bones" still appear (Caribbean
islands). Probably, he failed to grasp the scope of Plato's knowledge
which described three distinct seas: The Mediterranean which Plato
described as "only a harbor, having a narrow entrance," the
named sea (the Atlantic), and that other that "is the real sea
(the Pacific), with a surrounding land that may most truy called
continent (Asia)." In fact, the North Atlantic 11,500 years ago
could not have supported a climate such as that found in Plato's
description of lush Atlantis. With the geological knowledge available
at his time, Donnelly can hardly be faulted for mis-placing Atlantis,
but we should not continue to repeat this key error.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ignatius' work is enjoyable and packed with rare texts, October 2, 2005
Whether or not you think there was an Atlantis, this work should be read on account of the breath of insight which typifies some (not all) 19th century scholars. Professors today are often incapable of such writing because their feild of study is too narrow. This was written before Atlantis became associated with flaky new-age belief systems. It is packed with exerpts from hard to find texts from the ancient world. The analysis is graceful and intriguing, and it is hard to set the book down.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Atlantis - for sceptics!, January 3, 1999
By A Customer
When Eccleisiasticus said "Of the making of many books there is no end" he might have have been speaking about "Atlanteology"! And this would not include all the accounts by "Psychics", "Masters", and other colourful authors. Donnelly's book was first published in 1882, and has rarely been equalled for careful scholarship, meticulous research and honesty. The author marshalls enough facts and collects sufficient evidence to convince the most sceptical of his propositions. Those who have read more contemporary works on Atlantis will find this book a breath of fresh air. Those new to this study will find all the answers they seek and more within it's remarkable pages. If you want to know about Atlantis this is probably the best all-round source there is.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Do not buy this edition, October 18, 2009
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This edition is full of typos and useless new age advertising for websites etc... I could not even read it because it was so annoying. Everywhere in the book the word "he" is transposed/replaced with the word "be" for some unknown reason, not to mention other typos and errors. The editor, or whoever proofread this, must be blind! There is no way this book should be sold by Amazon, I've come to expect better from them. I want my hard earned money back and they need to send this book back to whatever garage it was printed in! BTW... I had to put one star because this feature would not let me post without any.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The definitive work for all Atlantis researchers!, February 11, 2002
This is the ultimate book on Atlantis. Well written (though hard to understand at times due to the 19th century grammar), well researched, and very informative. Required reading for anyone interesting in Atlantis. ...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Archaeology, February 20, 2011
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The book is good, it is wider than an average book so there is more on a page. However, the sentence structure hasn't been fixed since the 1700s (or whenever it was published) and is hard to read with periods in the middle of sentences. It is more so the work of an archaeologist or anthropologist and is very detailed. So detailed it is almost boring. I found it hard to read and quickly uninteresting.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the most fascinating books I've ever read - take it more seriously than you might expect to, March 18, 2014
This was one of the most fascinating books I've ever read. No, really.

1. You get excerpts from flood stories from every culture in the world (believe me, there are a lot!)

2. You get comparative 'mythology', religion, history and culture.

3. You get a glimpse of how archaeologists / historians thought of these things 100 years ago, when it was all first coming to the surface.

4. You can see the scary turn racism took in the first half of the 20th century. For me, that was interesting. Terrifying, but interesting. Because it's not something I was ever taught, and psychologically, I found myself wondering just how half the planet could have got swept away by ideas that were ultimately founded in a belief that we descended from the stars. You don't see that mentioned in WW2 documentaries on the History Channel, do you? But it's true. I've come across it so many times. And I think it's an important part of our history because it demonstrates the power of belief and stories. And I think that's very relevant to the modern world and the irrational wars and hate people still wage against each other. How will it ever stop if we don't look back on this stuff and see how insane it is.

I should note that I didn't get the impression the author of this book was racist. At one point, he actually states categorically that he believes every 'white' person in the world is partly 'black', as part of his hypothesis that the whole world was once one unified race that later spread in the aftermath of the great deluge. But he quoted a number of other 'great thinkers' from his time who, frankly, scared me. Yet these people seem to have been in the US Congress, etc. We like to think the Germans were alone in Naziism, but it was rife everywhere - including America. I think we shouldn't gloss over that.

At any rate - a really, really interesting book that gave me a lot more to think about than I expected.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars the antediluvian world, October 24, 2005
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Being a latinamerican reader as well as a student of the 19th egyptian dinasty, I have been delighted with Mr. Donnelly's treatment of the correlations between the native american and egyptian archeologies. This work becomes a magnificent base for the study of the hyperborean 1196 B.C. invasion, a theme of my deepest interest.I am of course interested in the other books in your Atlantis series. I highly recommend this book to the Amazon friends as an excellent historical review.Thanks !
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still a Cracking Read, November 24, 2010
In spite of its rejection by the academic establishment, this book remains a masterpiece of its genre, and has had a much bigger impact than is generally realised. There seems little doubt, for example, that Immanuel Velikovsky was greatly influenced by Donnelly, and it is a certainty that the recent revival of catastrophism traces much of its inspiration back to him, though most of the modern neo-catastrophists would probably deny it.
Leaving aside Donnelly's enormous contribution of collating catastrophe legends from many lands and cultures, Atlantis, the Antediluvian World also provided an exhaustive overview of cultural parallels between the Old World and the New. These, Donnelly demonstrated, go well beyond the usual and clichéd examples of pyramid-building and mummification, and extend to incredible details of life and custom on both sides of the Atlantic.
Donnelly's big mistake was his uncritical acceptance of the date provided by Plato for Atlantis' destruction (about 9500 BC) and his equally uncritical acceptance of the academic establishment's dates for the Pleistocene extinctions and the rise of the first civilizations. The critics were quick to point out, of course, that in the epoch mentioned by Plato (9500 BC) no civilization of any kind existed, far less the opulent Bronze Age culture described in the Timaeus and Critias. If such a civilization existed, they said, where are its remains? Donnelly argued that the culture of Atlantis must have been the prototype of all subsequent civilizations, and held that it was emigrants from the lost island who established the great cultures of the Old World and the New. This, he insisted, explained the striking parallels observed between the civilizations of the Old World and the New. Here again, however, chronology got in the way. According to conventional historians, the civilizations of the New World, with their pyramids, human sacrifice, and dragon-worship, were much younger than the ancient civilizations of the Old World, which also had pyramids, human sacrifice and dragon-worship. By the time the peoples of the Americas had begun to build pyramids, practice mummification, etc, the peoples of the Middle East had long abandoned these things. This was an objection Donnelly could not answer; and it is an objection that has remained unanswered to this day. It is an objection that cannot in fact be answered unless the chronology is challenged. But who would dare do that?
Well, Immanuel Velikovsky challenged the chronology very effectively in the 1950s, and the assault he launched on ancient dates and dating-systems was never effectively refuted by the academic establishment. If the Old World civilizations are not as old as is commonly believed, and if they are in fact the same age as the civilizations of the New World, then the parallels observed by Donnelly become very pertinent indeed. If, furthermore, the Atlantis civilization was not a prehistoric culture of the tenth millennium BC, but a culture of the Early Bronze Age, as the description of Plato implies, then we might be justified in accepting the whole story as having a factual basis.
We know that during the Neolithic and Early Bronze Ages the entire earth was afflicted by a series of powerful seismic disturbances, involving cataclysmic earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. This "vast eruptive age" as Percy Fawcett called it, left its mark throughout the Mediterranean and western Europe. Sunken Neolithic villages and forests are still regularly located around the coasts of the British Isles and Denmark, as well as much further afield. In volcanically active regions, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the disturbances must have been incomparably more severe; and this has been confirmed by the discovery of sunken beaches and shorelines (often hundreds of metres down) off the coasts of the Azores.
The evidence, as I have shown in various places, suggests that Atlantis was an Early Bronze Age culture centred on a main island in the Azores (about the size of Ireland) and an archipelago of smaller islands straddling the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. These acted as stepping stones between the Old World and the New; and it was by means of these that the tobacco and cocaine, found in many Egyptian mummies, reached the Old World. Near the end of the Early Bronze Age, during the last of the great cosmic disturbances, the mid-Atlantic islands were sunk and the transatlantic connection severed. Yet the peoples on either side of the ocean remembered the lost islands and retained traditions and customs so strikingly similar that they could not have developed in such a way coincidentally.
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Atlantis; The Antediluvian World
Atlantis; The Antediluvian World by Ignatius Donnelly (Paperback - November 15, 2013)
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