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Atlantis: The Antediluvian World Paperback – July 23, 2013


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Atlantis: The Antediluvian World + The Destruction of Atlantis: Ragnarok, or the Age of Fire and Gravel (Dover Books on Anthropology and Folklore) + Timaeus and Critias (Penguin Classics)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 158 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (July 23, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1491075848
  • ISBN-13: 978-1491075845
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 0.4 x 11 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,420,214 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

The author and politician Ignatius Donnelly was born in Philadelphia on 3 November 1831. He was educated in the public schools of his native city, studied law, was admitted to the bar, and practiced. He went to Minnesota in 1857, was elected lieutenant governor in 1859, and again in 1861, and was then elected to Congress as a Republican, serving from 7 December 1863 until 3 March 1869. Besides doing journalistic work he has written an Essay on the Sonnets of Shakespeare, and his most enduring work, Atlantis, the Antediluvian World (New York, 1882), in which he attempts to demonstrate that there once existed in the Atlantic Ocean, opposite the straits of Gibraltar, a large island, known to the ancients as "Atlantis"; and Ragnarok (1883), in which he tries to prove that the deposits of clay, gravel, and decomposed rocks, characteristic of the drift age, were the result of contact between the earth and a comet. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

The book is very readable and quite interesting.
Abraham Aponte
Required reading for anyone interesting in Atlantis. ...
"voicesimh"
It makes so much plausible, reasonable sense to me.
Rose

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

77 of 80 people found the following review helpful By "auarchitect" on December 26, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is the book that started it all, written a century ago by a man as strange and dynamic as his story. Every fantastical image of a sunken paradise, or heated dispute about it's existence and location, all started with these pages.
The origin of all Atlantis-hype, this book similarly starts with the origin of the concept itself. Donnely includes a translation of Plato's story that all Atlantean research goes back too. This was the most interesting part of the book, just hearing the first account all discussion and contemplation aside. It is also the most integral part of the book, since out of it comes all of Donnely's extrapolation.
The basic point of the rest of the book is to try to show that 1) Atlantis could have existed and disappeared geologically ages ago, and then furthermore 2) to explain Atlantis's affect on the rest of human history. Here, his attempts are the most interesting, and, often, the most ridiculous. Generally speaking though, he does state his case scientifically, and in most cases, rather believably.
The only glaring faults are his mistranslation of the original Plato, placing Atlantis most likely in the wrong area, and how sometimes he takes some rather huge leaps to justify his points. But hey, he wrote it 100 years ago and still manages to produce an intriguing study into the Atlantean question, without the aids of more advanced technologies.
Either way, it's a very interesting book, and whether you believe in Atlantis or not, I'm sure it will give you a lot to think about, which was indeed Donnely's purpose in the first place. I recommend it to any inquisitive mind.
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55 of 65 people found the following review helpful By George Erikson on September 28, 1999
Format: Paperback
Ignatius Donnelly's groundbreaking work suffers only from his
mis-reading of Plato as to the site of Atlantis. Donnelly's
translation of the Greek led to his placement of Atlantis as
"opposed to the Pillars of Hercules (Straits of Gibraltar)"
rather than "across" from the straits as related in Sir
Desmond Lee's definitive translation (Desmond Lee was knighted in 1961
for his work in translating Plato). Thus Donnelly, unfortunately to be
followed by scores of others, posited Atlantis as a sunken island in
the Atlantic (geologically unsustainable), rather than as an
island-continent across the Atlantic (the Americas)whose civilization
was destroyed but whose "bare-bones" still appear (Caribbean
islands). Probably, he failed to grasp the scope of Plato's knowledge
which described three distinct seas: The Mediterranean which Plato
described as "only a harbor, having a narrow entrance," the
named sea (the Atlantic), and that other that "is the real sea
(the Pacific), with a surrounding land that may most truy called
continent (Asia)." In fact, the North Atlantic 11,500 years ago
could not have supported a climate such as that found in Plato's
description of lush Atlantis. With the geological knowledge available
at his time, Donnelly can hardly be faulted for mis-placing Atlantis,
but we should not continue to repeat this key error.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Harry Graham Potter on October 2, 2005
Format: Paperback
Whether or not you think there was an Atlantis, this work should be read on account of the breath of insight which typifies some (not all) 19th century scholars. Professors today are often incapable of such writing because their feild of study is too narrow. This was written before Atlantis became associated with flaky new-age belief systems. It is packed with exerpts from hard to find texts from the ancient world. The analysis is graceful and intriguing, and it is hard to set the book down.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Homo Sapiens on October 18, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This edition is full of typos and useless new age advertising for websites etc... I could not even read it because it was so annoying. Everywhere in the book the word "he" is transposed/replaced with the word "be" for some unknown reason, not to mention other typos and errors. The editor, or whoever proofread this, must be blind! There is no way this book should be sold by Amazon, I've come to expect better from them. I want my hard earned money back and they need to send this book back to whatever garage it was printed in! BTW... I had to put one star because this feature would not let me post without any.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 3, 1999
Format: Hardcover
When Eccleisiasticus said "Of the making of many books there is no end" he might have have been speaking about "Atlanteology"! And this would not include all the accounts by "Psychics", "Masters", and other colourful authors. Donnelly's book was first published in 1882, and has rarely been equalled for careful scholarship, meticulous research and honesty. The author marshalls enough facts and collects sufficient evidence to convince the most sceptical of his propositions. Those who have read more contemporary works on Atlantis will find this book a breath of fresh air. Those new to this study will find all the answers they seek and more within it's remarkable pages. If you want to know about Atlantis this is probably the best all-round source there is.
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Format: Paperback
This was one of the most fascinating books I've ever read. No, really.

1. You get excerpts from flood stories from every culture in the world (believe me, there are a lot!)

2. You get comparative 'mythology', religion, history and culture.

3. You get a glimpse of how archaeologists / historians thought of these things 100 years ago, when it was all first coming to the surface.

4. You can see the scary turn racism took in the first half of the 20th century. For me, that was interesting. Terrifying, but interesting. Because it's not something I was ever taught, and psychologically, I found myself wondering just how half the planet could have got swept away by ideas that were ultimately founded in a belief that we descended from the stars. You don't see that mentioned in WW2 documentaries on the History Channel, do you? But it's true. I've come across it so many times. And I think it's an important part of our history because it demonstrates the power of belief and stories. And I think that's very relevant to the modern world and the irrational wars and hate people still wage against each other. How will it ever stop if we don't look back on this stuff and see how insane it is.

I should note that I didn't get the impression the author of this book was racist. At one point, he actually states categorically that he believes every 'white' person in the world is partly 'black', as part of his hypothesis that the whole world was once one unified race that later spread in the aftermath of the great deluge. But he quoted a number of other 'great thinkers' from his time who, frankly, scared me. Yet these people seem to have been in the US Congress, etc. We like to think the Germans were alone in Naziism, but it was rife everywhere - including America. I think we shouldn't gloss over that.

At any rate - a really, really interesting book that gave me a lot more to think about than I expected.
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