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The Atlantis Complex (Artemis Fowl, Book 7) Hardcover – Deckle Edge, August 3, 2010


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Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

In the seventh Artemis Fowl title, the 15-year-old mastermind focuses his ingenuity on global warming while struggling with a devastating illness. After Artemis invites four fairy friends to Iceland for a demonstration of his latest invention, the Ice Cube, it becomes clear that he is suffering from the Atlantis Complex, which manifests as obsessive-compulsive behavior, paranoia, and multiple personalities. If this weren’t enough to worry about, a spaceship crashes and disgorges amorphobots programmed to kill. Colfer keeps the action moving with laughs and gadgetry as he bounces between several plotlines that spotlight peripheral characters. A treat for series fans. Grades 5-8. --Lynn Rutan

Review

In the seventh Artemis Fowl title, the 15-year-old mastermind focuses his ingenuity on global warming while struggling with a devastating illness. After Artemis invites four fairy friends to Iceland for a demonstration of his latest invention, the Ice Cube, it becomes clear that he is suffering from the Atlantis Complex, which manifests as obsessive-compulsive behavior, paranoia, and multiple personalities. If this weren't enough to worry about, a spaceship crashes and disgorges amorphobots programmed to kill. Colfer keeps the action moving with laughs and gadgetry as he bounces between several plotlines that spotlight peripheral characters. A treat for series fans.—Booklist
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 and up
  • Grade Level: 5 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 900L (What's this?)
  • Series: Artemis Fowl (Book 7)
  • Hardcover: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Disney-Hyperion; 1 edition (August 3, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1423128192
  • ISBN-13: 978-1423128199
  • Product Dimensions: 5.6 x 1.2 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (256 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #313,723 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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More About the Author

Eoin Colfer (pronounced Owen) is the New York Times best-selling author
of the blockbuster Artemis Fowl series as well as Airman; Half Moon
Investigations; The Supernaturalist; Eoin Colfer's Legend of... books;
The Wish List; Benny and Omar; and Benny and Babe. He was born in
Wexford on the southeast coast of Ireland in 1965, where he and his four
brothers were brought up by his father (an elementary school teacher,
historian and artist of note) and mother (a drama teacher). He first
developed an interest in writing in primary (elementary) school with
gripping Viking stories inspired by history that he was learning in
school at the time.

Eoin got his degree from Dublin University and qualified as a primary
school teacher, returning to work in Wexford. He married in 1991 and he
and his wife spent about 4 years between 1992 and 1996 working in Saudi
Arabia, Tunisia and Italy. His first book, Benny and Omar, was published
in 1998, based on his experiences in Tunisia; it has since been
translated into many languages; a sequel followed in 1999. In 2001, the
first Artemis Fowl book was published worldwide to much success -
shortly thereafter he left teaching to concentrate fully on his writing.
To this day, Eoin has written 6 Artemis Fowl books which have sold over
12 million copies worldwide.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

67 of 76 people found the following review helpful By Heather Babb on August 3, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I must begin this review by telling you that this book is completely different than any other book in the series. Like, really. Artemis even discusses how the adventure was different in the Epilogue. Not that it doesn't fit in; the seat-of-the-pants adventure and delicious humour is still there. But something about it is just......different. Maybe it's the villain who is driven more by romance than anything else. Maybe it's the fact that the heroes are, the majority of the time, two steps behind said villain rather than two steps ahead. I think the second one is it. It seems like the heroes have a helpless demeanor about them most of the time. But somehow, this adds to the story rather than detracting from it. The perilous state of Artemis's mind adds an emotional level to this story that none of the other's seem to have. I thoroughly enjoyed the jaunts into Artemis's brain; the alter-ego Orion is also a delight to read about. There is something slightly darker about this book, too, which I think is a good thing. Like I said, it is a tad-more emotionally driven than the rest. I find this fascinating. Also, I was thrilled by the fact that most of the plot was a blatant set-up for a future Artemis/Holly relationship (SPOILERS: The elf having a human wife, Orion claiming that Artemis also has unspoken feelings for Holly, Holly claiming Trouble isn't her boyfriend. Is anyone else PUMPED!?). I love the way Artemis is slowly becoming a better and better person, specifically the fact that he is prepared to give all her has to the environment. I would also like to point out that The Time Paradox is NOT random as so many seem to think. It sets up a lot of plot elements in this one, mostly involving Artemis's further growth.Read more ›
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful By RandomizeME on August 15, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Loyal readers of the series will notice almost immediately that Artemis Fowl is not operating at 100% for Book 7. Artemis suffers from compulsions, fear of the number 4, increasing paranoia and loss of touch with reality. Worst of all, when Artemis' ingenuity is most needed (as an old foe of the fairyfolk returns to power), Artemis' smooth-talking romantic hero alter-ego Orion surfaces and takes over as the dominant personality. Is everything lost for the fairy people?

By now, Eoin Colfer has his formula down pat, we have the expected non-stop action & adventure, laugh out loud humor (although some jokes were a bit stale) and inventive fairy-made gadgets that would delight any techno-geek out there.

Old favorites (the dwarf Mulch Diggins is still the scene-stealer) and the usual suspects return for this adventure, but even though Orion Fowl is a total riot and totally delightful in his own right, 'The Atlantis Complex' really suffered from the lack of Artemis Fowl himself. It's just not the same without the ole' Artemis around. It's funny if you think about it, Artemis is so awkward, stilted and unemotional, but this book proves that HE is the heart and soul of everyone around him. With Artemis trapped in his mind, the heroes are suddenly helpless and bumbling, always playing catch-up but not quite to the villain. I did enjoy the mind-trip of being able to spy inside Artemis' brain so that's a plus.

Another weakness for this book is that the plot is not as complex as usual; I've always enjoyed the unpredictable double-cross/triple-cross elements & the mind-twisting tricks that Eoin Colfer adds to the books, but maybe he's run out of steam this time around.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By excuisite_1 on September 26, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I have read all the Artemis Fowl books. I've always enjoyed reading this series. However, I found this latest installment, "The Atlantis Complex" to be sub par. The characters aren't as entertaining and the plot is sub par. At the end of the story the reader is left thinking "Is that it? Really?" because nothing spectacular or truly inventive happens like it does in the novels leading up to this one.

Artemis just isn't as interesting when he's not an evil genius. By making Artemis such a weak character in this title I believe the author has damaged the image he's spent so much time creating. I hope in future titles that the author will return Artemis to his original self.

I'd like to point out that while I am criticizing this novel the others are quite good and I believe the series has great promise of overcoming this stumbling block.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jim and Shauna Ortiz on March 13, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This book did not spark like the others. It was so difficult for me to stick with, that it's still not finished ~ 8 months later ..Almost as if it was written by a different author...
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24 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Jimmy B. on August 15, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
There is little I can add that hasn't been discussed by the other reviewers, but I think it is important to note that this addition to an otherwise imaginative, inventive, complex, and wittily charming series of books suffers a notable lack of quality when compared to its predecessors. While the plot and characterization fails to meet the standard set by the previous books, most notable to myself was a distinct difference in the quality of the writing itself. When compared to the first two books of the series, one can't help but feel if Colfer wrote this in his spare time then published it while his editor was on vacation, or found a ghostwriter to produce the books while he focuses on other projects. (I nearly stopped reading entirely when Colfer constructed a simile paraphrased thus: "as fast as a really fast thing." I'd give you the quote and page number if I were willing to read the book again to find it! This is a far cry from the opening of the first novel in which Artemis is graphically and pointedly described "as white as a vampire and almost as testy in the light of day.")

As if this weren't bad enough, the plot, character interaction, and villain is formulaic and predictable. Perhaps Colfer wanted to focus more on the bigger conflict within this novel, which takes place within Artemis' own mind as he struggles for dominance over his long-repressed hopelessly romantic inner identity. While this sounds like an intriguing psychological exploration of the boy-genius-slash-criminal-mastermind, ultimately, we are robbed of the titular character that makes the novels so enjoyable - Artemis Fowl - as he is replaced by an amusing though tiresome alter ego.
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