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Atlas of Human Anatomy, 2nd Edition Paperback – January 15, 1997

ISBN-13: 978-0914168812 ISBN-10: 0914168819 Edition: 2nd

10 New from $74.22 43 Used from $9.01
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Paperback, January 15, 1997
$74.22 $9.01

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 525 pages
  • Publisher: Novartis; 2nd edition (January 15, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0914168819
  • ISBN-13: 978-0914168812
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 1.3 x 11.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (87 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #216,581 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Now in its second edition, this is undoubtedly the best single-volume medical atlas available today, the only better resource being Netter's classic eight-volume set, published in 13 physical volumes over 33 years starting in 1959 and originally called CIBA Collection of Medical Illustrations after the publisher. (The name was changed to Netter's Collection of Medical Illustrations by the new publisher, Novartis.) Once again, Netter's masterly artwork has been faithfully reproduced, though the first edition (LJ 12/89) has been updated to reflect current anatomical knowledge and to incorporate new cross-sectional images to assist in the recognition of current "scanned" images. Organized by anatomical regions, the illustrations are colorful, easily defined, and clearly labeled, and the book closes with a very easy-to-use 48-page index. Highly recommended for public and academic librariesAEric D. Albright, Duke Univ. Medical Ctr. Lib., Durham, NC
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

I, for one, will be keeping this book for the rest of my life!
"xfangel"
In comparing Netter's atlas to the actual cadaver, you'll be amazed to see how precise his images really are.
"vanessa12478"
Without a doubt, Netter's Human Anatomy is the best anatomy atlas on the market.
charles eilert

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

123 of 125 people found the following review helpful By neurotome on June 29, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Frank Netter's atlas compiles his paintings of every imaginable human body part, seen in various degrees of dissection, into one volume. Dr. Netter's talent for reproducing the facts of anatomy is exquisite and unquestionable. However, as one looks a little deeper, it becomes clear that Netter is in fact a guru of function as well. Nerves, outlined in an unearthly yellow, terminate on muscles they actually innervate. Tendinous insertions are always on the correct part of bony protuberances, and fiber direction is always carefully detailed. Any unusual functional variances, such as the dual sympathetic/parasympathetic function of Vidian's nerve, or such as the pulley effect on the trochlear nerve, are always painstakingly pointed out. Netter also excels in variation, presenting, for example, 11 normal variants of the cystic and hepatic ducts.
The alternatives are few and inadequate. Pernkopf is often cited as Netter's chief rival; his experimentation on living persons incarcerated in Nazi concentration camps forbids me from perusing his text, on ethical grounds. Grant's atlas is laughably inadequate by comparison, both in number and quality of the plates. And Gray's, the old standby, simply cannot measure up; Netter's bold colors and functional depictions are clearly superior.
Rohen and Yokochi, a photographic atlas, offers the advantage of being photographs of superb dissections, and therefore more like what one encounters in the anatomy lab. Some find it useful as a supplement to Netter's atlas. I also used Moore's textbook of anatomy; the plates, from Grant's atlas, are not so good, but the text can be used to expand and illuminate on the relevant plates in Netter's, and the text is well written and clear.
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50 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Lee R. Miller on March 23, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I have been a forensic pathologist for more than twenty years and refer to texts and atlases of anatomy on an almost daily basis. This is, by far, the best atlas I have ever used. Dr. Netter's genius lies in his being able to render complex anatomy in lucid and easily grasped pictures that still look like the real thing. He makes it appear effortless and his real brilliance can only be grasped by comparing his atlas to other (and usually more expensive) works that just do not measure up. I wish I had this atlas in medical school, but am delighted in being able to refer to it now. It is one of those pearls that every first year medical student, nursing student and paramedic simply must have in their personal library. It will prove indispensable in every stage of their careers.
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51 of 57 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 24, 1996
Format: Paperback
I am the mother of a first year medical student. My daughter was at a loss in her first month at school - struggling with her Gross Anatomy Course. Our family doctor (he is actually a Neuro-Surgeon) suggested that I purchase Netter's "Atlas of Human Anatomy" swearing that he could never have gone through Anatomy it. I live in Malaysia and my daughter is studying in the Philippines. In both countries, we could not find this book! I found it right here at Amazon! The book was shipped by DHL and it has since been my daughter's bedside companion. She is still struggling with her Anatomy Course...but definitely this book of Netter has helped her SO MUCH. I have read through it myself and realized how difficult it is really to be a doctor. Atlas of Human Anatomy is a genius's work of art. Netter clearly defines the anatomical parts of the human body. Other reference/text books that are of great help to Anatomy students are: Grant's Atlas of Human Anatomy (which also has a Dissector) and Rohen & Yokochi's "Color Atlas of Anatomy" which is a photographic atlas of cadavers - a very good guide for practicals. Both books (Grant's and Rohen's) are found right here at AMAZON
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57 of 69 people found the following review helpful By Henry Lenzi on April 11, 2005
Format: Paperback
Netter's genius shines in the CIBA books, not on this atlas. It lacks fundamental correlations with what today's student must acquaint themselves with: MRI, CT, x-rays, and not to forget physical examination.
I guess the rave is all about only knowing this atlas, and also because older professors only know this atlas. I am not saying this is a bad atlas at all. All I am saying is that there are other choices that integrate information in a more meaningful way for today's medical student.
Our anatomy dissection group had Netter, Sobbotta, Grant's, Yokoshi's, and McMinn's atlases. We found Netter and Sobbotta to have "pretty pictures". Yokoshi had cadaver sections only, but they were executed by anatomy experts. If you followed it, you would get in trouble and section something you shouldn't (we become so appreciative of the human body's simmetry because of that). Same with McMinn's (and we also found some dissections not very inteligible, I might add). Students that displayed avoidance behavior towards dissection, and were more of the "exam cram" types favored Netter (that might also have been because of a lack of curiosity regarding other atlases). But we were not so, we stayed until late in the dissection room, only leaving when the night shift guard *made* us leave.
The atlas that truly delivered a nice view of anatomical *relations* between parts, and had dissections we could follow on the table, and that contained clear correlations with clinical and imaging information (part of our anatomy exam involved not only cadaver but x-rays, CT, and clinical topography) was Grant's Atlas of Anatomy. That was what we discovered trough trial and error. It costs a lot less than some other atlases, and it is underrated, but it delivers much more. But YMMV.
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