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Atmospheric Justice: A Political Theory of Climate Change Hardcover – April 16, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-0195334609 ISBN-10: 0195334604

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (April 16, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195334604
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195334609
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.5 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,100,034 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Just as human societies enter the two to three year period in which the definitive decisions will be made about climate change, Vanderheiden has provided a sophisticated model of the underlying issues of justice, appealingly combining a forward-looking allocation of emissions and a backward-looking
allocation of adaptation costs."--Henry Shue, Senior Research Fellow at Merton College and Professor of Politics and International Relations, Oxford University
"Vanderheiden has made an original, innovative and important contribution to the growing literature on climate change, environmental policy, and theories of distributive and remedial justice. Atmospheric Justice is a veritable model of how to combine policy analysis with political theory."--Terence
Ball, Professor, Department of Political Science, Arizona State University
"Is justice theory equipped to deal with the special challenges that climate change represents? Steve Vanderheiden offers a precise accounting of the liberal's normative resources and develops his own richly textured version of distributive justice, grounded--vitally and unusually--in a persuasive
theory of responsibility."--Andrew Dobson, Professor of Politics, Keele University

About the Author

Steve Vanderheiden is Assistant Professor of Political Science and Environmental Studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he specializes in normative political theory and environmental politics.

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Customer Reviews

2.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is loooooooooooonnnggg. It could have easily been a third of the length and still have effectively made its point. I'm no stranger to tedious works but I just couldn't get myself to keep reading it.
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Format: Paperback
I just looked up the other reviewer of this book, the so-called "Dr." P.R. Lewis. Past reviews from this reviewer contain an unusual number of one-star reviews, almost all tied to subject matter he does not like. Basically, any book that involves environmental protection or concern gets 1-Star.

Perhaps he really is reading these books, though it is hard to imagine why he would. Whether or not this is the case, he appears to have hit upon a strategy to kill books. The author of Atmospheric Justice should fight back and get a legitimate review on here. Hopefully, my 5-stars will add some balance until then.
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2 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Dr. P. R. Lewis on May 20, 2012
Format: Paperback
The onward march of the zombie global warmers continues with this book. It is really a diatribe against the well-known resistance of the USA in opposing carbon taxes already adopted by the EU to meet their Kyoto commitments. The author swallows the IPCC doctrines, last espoused in 2007, which predict the imminent demise of life on the planet as a direct result of anthropocentric global warming, or AGW. The hypothesis is based on computer models which are deeply flawed because they fail to account for the many natural cycles in the weather known to climatologists. The IPCC confidently predict rises in sea level, higher temperatures, loss of species, stronger hurricanes, floods everywhere and general chaos and mayhem. However, Armageddon is delayed because such disasters have not been observed in the last decade, and indeed, the worst disasters have been tsunamis and earthquakes, phenomena totally unconnected with the levels of CO2 in the air (the guilty gas of the IPCC). It is we who are creating the problem, mainly through electricity generated by coal fired power stations, apparently. The earth is currently in a cooling phase, as winters in Europe have shown quite clearly. Alarmist authors like Vanderheiden thus have a serious problem in trying to pin the blame on the US government of Bush. He ought to direct his attention elsewhere, such as China and India, two countries who are dragging themselves out of poverty by their own efforts, but especially by the use of coal-generated electricity. But the theme of his book is justice, presumably at an international level. But all the attempts at signing a binding agreement on emissions have come to nothing, and there is no likelihood of any treaty any time in the future.Read more ›
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