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Attack from Atlantis Mass Market Paperback – July 12, 1982


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Del Rey (July 12, 1982)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345305019
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345305015
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 4.2 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,315,572 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By DELee on February 17, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Many of us who came to science fiction in the 1950s credit our introduction to the genre to the Winston series. Winston recruited a stable of well-established SF authors, including such icons as Arthur C. Clarke, Ben Bova, Lester del Rey, and Poul Anderson, to write a series of books for the 13-17 age group. The quality of the writing ranged from poor to pretty darn good. Attack From Atlantis is one of several Winston SF books by Lester del Rey (who also wrote under the names Philip Saint John and Erik Van Lhin) that have recently become available as e-Books. That’s a happy development for those of us who fondly remember the original hard cover editions, because Del Rey was unquestionably one of the best writers who contributed to the Winston series. He was also the most prolific, writing nine of the novels, plus the one nonfiction book (Rockets Through Space), in the series.

Published in 1954, when the USS Nautilus, the world’s first nuclear powered submarine, was already under construction, Attack From Atlantis is an account of the test run of a submarine with a new type of nuclear engine. The voyage is going well until people from an underwater civilization manage to disable the vessel and pull it down to a city in a bubble on the floor of the Atlantic. The inhabitants of the city are well-aware of the surface world and of war, nuclear weapons, etc. They fear that the growing capacity of surface-dwellers to explore the depths will bring these things into their formerly isolated realm. The crew are treated well, but they are imprisoned and can’t go home again. The one exception is a 17-year-old prodigy who is allowed free run of the city, since he is seen as an uneducated child. Of course, it falls to him to rescue both his shipmates and the people of the city from disaster.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Paul Camp on February 17, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Oh, yessiree Bob. We are all casual and blase about atomic powered submarines _today_. We have all read our Tom Clancy novels and seen all the James Bond movies. We know what they are like. But there was a time... There was a time...

_Attack from Atlantis_ (1953) by Lester del Rey is set partly on the atomic powered submarine _Triton_. In a foreward to the novel, del Rey refers to the first real-life atomic sub: "The _Nautilus_ is already being built. And just as this is being written, word has come that the first tests of an atomic power plant for the ship have been successful" (ix). In the novel, del Rey spends a bit of time explaining the difference between the nuclear engine of the _Nautilus_ and that of his fictional _U.S.S. Triton_.

Del Rey was not a professional scientist. But he had a better than average layman's knowledge of nuclear physics, and he wrote several popular books and articles on the subject. I suspect that there were a great many political and military leaders who knew less about nuclear energy than del Rey. There were even scientists of the day who believed that a little fallout was good for you. Del Rey knew better. So if the novel is in some respects a routine adventure, del Rey deserves a few points for knowing about atomic power before we were as wise and sophisticated as we are today.

Perhaps a few words might be said about the cover artist to the original Winston hardback, Kenneth Fagg (1901-1980). He had a strong background in architecture and geography and created the world's largest geophysical globe. He did covers for some of the big commercial magazines of the day-- _Holiday_, _Life_, and the _Saturday Evening Post_. But there were also those spectacular covers for _If_ in the early 1950s, some of them wraparounds.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By avoraciousreader on March 9, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Attack from Atlantis
Lester del Rey

Enjoyable if somewhat dated 4*

OK, one of our reviewers on this book has covered in depth the "atomic submarine" aspect of the book and the dust jacket illustrator, without mentioning the characters or plot or undersea people or writing or really anything about the book itself. The other also almost managed to avoid saying anything about the book at all. So I'll jump in and tell you a bit of what the book is about, and give my tupenny worth.

The nuclear submarine Triton is ready for its first "real run," and with a novel underwater nuclear jet engine and improved alloys for the hull, it's set to go to great depths. It also generates oxygen from plants, another innovation allowing for long submersion. Don Miller's "Uncle Eddy," engineer and metallurgist Dr. Simpson to the rest of the world, is in charge, and Don expects to be the radar and sonar officer on the maiden voyage, despite his tender age of "almost eighteen." But this is an era of increasing national conflict (after a period of peace) and the Navy takes over, assigns its own crew, and Don is out ... until called in as a last minute replacement.

The Triton had just returned from a trial run, in which the diving planes had jammed and the trim tank valves were clogged with a strange tarry substance. And a couple of men had seen, or thought they'd seen, men swimming freely at 400 fathoms, encased in form fitting bubbles. But these reports are dismissed as either outright hallucinations brought on by the hostile and strange environment, or misperception of some strange, unknown life form. The traces of copper on the diving planes are dismissed as coming from "junk" the sub must have run into.
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