Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on April 27, 2015
Makes a great case why we need to get rid of religious privilege.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on April 25, 2015
I’ve been a faithful church-goer for most of my 57 years, but I have always said that I don’t want my church teaching my kids math or my kids’ school teaching them religion. Needless to say, I’m a firm believer in the First Amendment’s separation of church and state. When I see today’s politicians embracing right-wing evangelicalism at the same time as they despise all of the things that Jesus actually taught (e.g., comfort for the poor and afflicted, healing the sick, compassion for prisoners and sinners, an interest in actual born children rather than just zygotes, a zealous dislike of religious hypocrites), it makes my blood boil. Thank God for Sean Faircloth and his Attack of the Theocrats! How the Religious Right Harms Us All – and What We Can Do About It. (Forgive me: I just couldn’t resist!)

Sean Faircloth, onetime state legislator from Maine and current director of strategy and policy for the U.S. branch of the Richard Dawkins Foundation for Reason and Science, has authored a powerful book that combines a very brief history of freethinkers in America, a critique of the fundamentalists’ hold on Congress and state legislatures and their abysmal ignorance of U.S. history (particularly the Founding Fathers’ distaste for mainstream Christianity), and a blueprint for restoring the separation of church and state in the American landscape. Alternately enlightening and entertaining, Faircloth does a fabulous job. How fabulous? I bought the Audible version in which he reads his own book; however, Faircloth cites so many pithy quotations from the likes of Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Benjamin Franklin, and Abraham Lincoln — and others — that I had to buy the Kindle edition so that I could highlight these quotations and his excellent statistics for future use. Recommended for atheists and thoughtful theists alike.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on March 4, 2015
I agree with most all of the authors points and is a must read for americans. We're a democratic republic, not a theocracy. The only point I disagree with the author is the disclosure to a parent concerning abortions for minors. I am pro-choice, however, the parent has a legal duty to their child and therefore, if the state performs an abortion on behalf of a minor child, the state is undermining the parents legal duty to their child. Otherwise, a great book and easy to read.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on February 26, 2015
Along the vein of the 2006 publication "The Theocons", only if anything even more demonstrative of America's continuing to slide ever more closely to a combined ultra right-wing Fascists theocracy / plutocracy oriented dictatorship.

A must read to see the clearly intentional phases of this process unfolding.

I would strongly suggest a number of well researched (in one case extremely so) books that demonstrate how far this strategy veers away from the intents of our Founding Fathers (and literally the beliefs of several).

A number of 5- star reviews were spot on.

These are books that are especially good in dealing with the input of the core Founding Fathers (and the backgrounds that influenced them).

An exceptional book in that regards would be "Nature's God" by Matthew Stewart (be forewarned, it is a book that needs strong focus to wade through and get its fullest measure). This +400 page book has (additionally) over 90 pages of reference notes.

Equally good books (that are somewhat easier reads) include "The Faith of Our Founding Fathers" by David Holmes, "Revolutionary Spirits" by Gary Kowalski (also especially good), "Moral Minority" by Brooke Allen and from the then recognized best-selling publicist of the Revolution whose works impacted very significantly on the sway of the Colonies towards Independence and in staying the course, "Thomas Paine Complete Works" by Daryl Marks (or any of his direct writings such as "Common Sense").

Remember:

John 8:32

As Theocratic politicians and avid active fundamentalist supporters would likewise do well to recall (as many of their activities put them in heretical violation of their own Holy Scripture of the inerrant Word of God):

Romans 13:1-2

Romans 13:6

1 Peter 2:13-14

Matthew 22:20-22

For ignorance in this Age of Information is so offensive as to be an abomination!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on December 26, 2014
Eminently readable, entertaining, and well researched. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. In one section, the author becomes a bit snarky. He is easily forgiven for this, but we would have been better served had his entire discourse remained dignified and scholarly.

I think we must resist, strenuously, overreacting to the extravagant hypocrisy of our opponents (though this is a great challenge) and maintain the high ground. This is well-structured prose, neatly and thoughtfully organized. Really, just excellent. This man is a fine writer and he has the reader in mind as he writes. This is not self-indulgent intellectualism. It is communication at an admirable level. I highly recommend this. I'm not sure I've read a book which encompasses the threat of theocracy as well as this one. Well done, Mr. Faircloth.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on December 17, 2014
AN IMPORTANT BOOK! SHOULD BE READ BY EVERY AMERICAN VOTER.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on October 26, 2014
Every one should read it.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on October 23, 2014
Sean Faircloth is a man with strong credentials to back up his work in Attack Of The Theocrats! How The Religious Right Harms Us All - And What We Can Do About It. As a five-term politician on the Main Legislature, serving as Majority Whip during his last term, former executive director of the Secular Coalition for America, as well as director of strategy and policy for the US branch of the Richard Dawkins Foundation for Reason and Science, he has a solid history from which to draw upon in examining the significant strain of theocracy that is running amok in America and has shaped a vision for the future of this country in combating the religious right with his plans for the Secular Decade Plan.

Faircloth confesses to having a particular fascination for speeches - particularly those of John F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King - and his time as a lawyer no doubt helped him hone his concise and pragmatic manner of delivery that is on display in this book. The writing is crisp and to the point.

However, I found this conciseness to actually a bit of a detriment, as he hit upon certain abuses from the inequity in laws to favor religious services, or to flat out deny minority groups an equal standing in society, that I would have liked him to explore more deeply. I realize, though, that such topics might warrant entire tomes of their own, but the brevity of this work sometimes makes it feel more like a primer to garner interest in the benefits of secularism, rather than an in-depth exploration of why, exactly, secularism is a necessity in modern America. And while I have little doubt about the veracity of Faircloth's assertions given my own research into similar topics and accounts that I've read elsewhere, I really wish he would have been more liberal in citing his sources in order to help readers do their own bit of fact-checking and to be able to pursue topics in greater detail than what's given here.

That said, the stories and information as presented certainly pack a wallop, while also driving home the author's central premise with far too many disheartening facts. When it comes to going for the guts, Faircloth knows when to launch into an emotionally engaging, and aggressive, attack on the brutal injustices of the fundamentalists, particularly in areas in which religious doctrines and organizations use and abuse children.

I would challenge any reader to not sneer in disgust at the level of abuses Faircloth details in describing how unlicensed religious child-care centers are able to flaunt and totally disregard basic health and safety laws that have would have shut it down had the care center been a secular institution, and which, in multiple instances, have led to the death of multiple children at worst, and allowing infants to sit in dirty diapers or wander a deserted playground alone and naked, all the while receiving federal taxpayer funds. And try to keep the bile down as he lists the many ways that so-called "faith healing" harms, at best, or kills, at worst, children saddled with such ignorant parents who would rather have their child die than let them be treated with modern medicine. And, of course, there is also the physical and sexual abuse carried out by predatory clergy and the fervent faithful.

The read is far from a list of far-right religiously motivated atrocities, though, and Faircloth presents a very grounded and even-handed treatment of why fairness and equality is not only needed, but something that we, as Americans, must demand. It's a heartening plea that he rounds out with a sense of optimism as he charts a ten-year-long course for secularists to regain ground lost to fundamentalism. By using emotional stories rather than sheer statistics, grassroots organizing, and applying his Ten Point Vision of a Secular America, along with increased advocacy against the injustices perpetuated in unequal measures of law by religious favoritism, he aims to inspire a broader base of voices that can not only help reclaim America, but build a better American based on the values of its Founders. This is a read I'd easily recommend, especially before voting!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on August 11, 2014
A book that is necessary. A book that is eye-popping especially to those who have not been paying attention to the resurgence of the religious Right in the US.

Their agenda is clear and it is dangerous, and that is to change our country into a soft theocracy one law at a time. Deny this at your peril.

BUY THIS BOOK.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on June 4, 2014
Sean nailed this.....I donated to the Richard Dawkins Foundation immediately after reading. I also ordered the "Religion, together we can find a cure" t-shirt. Now lets whip this dogma!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.