Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Attorney for the Damned: Clarence Darrow in the Courtroom Paperback – February 15, 1989

ISBN-13: 978-0226136493 ISBN-10: 0226136493 Edition: 1st

18 New from $15.99 45 Used from $1.22 4 Collectible from $36.85
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$0.55
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.99 $1.22
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$14.00
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

Attorney for the Damned: Clarence Darrow in the Courtroom + The Story Of My Life
Buy the selected items together
  • The Story Of My Life $18.90

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 576 pages
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (February 15, 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226136493
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226136493
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.6 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #349,877 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Arthur Weinberg was the Lloyd Lewis Fellow in American History at the Newberry Library in Chicago at the time of his death in 1989. He was the coauthor, with Lila Weinberg, of The Muckrackers, Verdicts Out of Court, and Clarence Darrow: A Sentimental Rebel, among other books.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Arnold W. Shunneson on March 29, 2002
Format: Paperback
Book is stunning. Makes you realize that language used to be more valued. The guy was amazing simply amazing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By B. Clarke on December 22, 2008
Format: Paperback
Anyone considering a career as a trial lawyer should read this book. So should anyone interested in American history: Darrow the lawyer was smack in the middle of every major issue, cause, and debate in the first third of the twentieth century. The sign on his office door read "We Defend Everyone," and he lived up to that promise. Darrow defended Leopold and Loeb, argued against capital punishment, argued for the right to teach evolution in schools, represented union members, communist party members, and defendants of all stripes in all sorts of murder cases -- including several high profile capital cases in which the accused were members of minority groups. In short, he defended all those who were "damned" by the government and the public in the early twentieth century. As the closing arguments in this book demonstrate, Darrow was a great and powerful orator, a persuasive debater, the common man as brilliant philosopher, a speaker who could wax eloquent with the best of them -- and ultimately a hard-working, dedicated trial lawyer who won his cases by speaking plainly and simply to petit jurors, person to person. Many of his summations left the jurors, and everyone else in the courtroom, in tears. If you don't want your son or daughter to go to law school, don't let him or her read this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By G. Filipovic on May 12, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Has transcripts of many of his closing arguments. He was a great philosopher, not only a lawyer. A worthy read. I lend it to others, and never get it back, so I have to constantly buy new copies of the book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Acute Observer on February 26, 2005
Format: Paperback
The 'Forward' by Justice William O. Douglas says this book contains addresses delivered to juries in criminal cases, and speeches on controversial subjects. Darrow opposed bigotry, prejudice, ignorance, and hate. He was always fighting for equal protection, due process, and a fair trial. Darrow trusted juries more than judges to protect the life and liberty of the citizen. He was also a champion of labor when unions were often regarded as illegal, and suffered from government by injunction.

The 'Introduction' by Arthur Weinberg says Darrow was an orator who played on the emotions of his listeners. But people acted mainly through emotions. Darrow's pleas always had a powerful rational basis. He also defended many causes that were unpopular at the time. Clarence Darrow was a corporate lawyer until he became an attorney for the American Railway Union and its president Eugene Victor Debs. Was it a matter of conscience (p.xxx)? This book contains an edited selection of Darrow's speeches, giving the background and the aftermath.

"Crime and Criminals" has his speech to the prisoners in the Cook County jail. Darrow contrasts the acts of the convicts to the actions of the monopolists (gas, trolley, oil). Advertisements in the newspapers are all lies. More people go to jail in hard times than in good times. Most people who go to jail are poor; they can't afford a good lawyer. There is a correlation between increased poverty and increased crime. Darrow suggests crime is a natural phenomenon, like cattle seeking a better pasture. Having a good lawyer is more important than guilt or innocence! Laws exist to protect the ruling class, not to do justice. Darrow suggests that living where there is plenty of land and a chance to make a living would result in no crime (p.14).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?