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Late August, Early September


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Playback Region 2 :This will not play on most DVD players sold in the U.S., U.S. Territories, Canada, and Bermuda. See other DVD options under “Other Formats & Versions”. Learn more about DVD region specifications here

Editorial Reviews

es saisons du coeur auscultées par un des cinéastes français les plus romanesques de sa génération. À travers ce portrait de groupe avec dames, Olivier Assayas, auteur d'Irma Vep, tisse une année de destinées sentimentales et affectives dans la vie d'un trentenaire, petit frère du Dedalus de Comment je me suis disputé (ma vie sexuelle) d'Arnaud Desplechin, déjà incarné par Mathieu Amalric. Le talent que possède le réalisateur des Destinées sentimentales pour embraser le quotidien le plus trivial avec ce sens si particulier du romanesque rapproche son septième opus de certains Claude Sautet pour son aspect choral, mais surtout de François Truffaut, comme en témoignent le découpage en chapitres, les fondus au noir ou les nombreuses ellipses. Si le réalisateur de L'Eau froide et de Désordre nous livre là son film le plus touchant, c'est en partie grâce à un quatuor d'acteurs au diapason, qui réunit outre Mathieu Amalric, étonnant de charme et de naturel, François Cluzet, impressionnant en écrivain-gourou entre la vie et la mort, Virginie Ledoyen, au printemps de son existence, et Jeanne Balibar, grave et légère à la fois.

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Mathieu Amalric, Virginie Ledoyen, François Cluzet, Jeanne Balibar, Alex Descas
  • Directors: Olivier Assayas
  • Writers: Olivier Assayas
  • Producers: Françoise Guglielmi, Georges Benayoun, Philippe Carcassonne
  • Format: Anamorphic, Full Screen, NTSC
  • Language: French (Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo)
  • Region: Region 2 (Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Run Time: 112 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00004VXTM
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #264,671 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Late August, Early September" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 12, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
Some will say french melodramas are too understated and long winded but i found myself thoroughly enjoying this character-driven gem. Editing is reminescent of Godard with its jump-cut scene transitions and non-static camera movements. If you like slow character-evolving films without the overt freudian-analysis and preaching, go check out the film at a rental before purchasing.
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 29, 2000
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
Late August, Early September is a gem. If you like Rohmer, but need more 'character complexity', this film will satisfy your need for intellectual stimulation, poignancy, and reality.
This film is to cinema what Kundera is to literature.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ronald Scheer on July 6, 2009
Format: DVD
Unlike Ozu films that are named after the time of year in which they are set, this absorbing film by French director Olivier Assayas refers more to a time of life and the feelings that accompany the awareness that one's youth is over and one's aspirations have remained unfulfilled. The title's reference to a cusp between seasons also reflects the film's interest in "in-betweenness." Characters are in between relationships, in between commitments, in between an unsettled present and an undetermined future.

The plot of the story (if it can be said to have one) is apparent mostly in retrospect, as the death of one of the characters has an impact on the lives of friends and associates. But it's not plot you enjoy in this film. Instead it's the often self-absorbed characters, on whom life's lessons are gradually dawning - we don't always get what we want, and we're not good at anticipating what will make us happy. Attempts to get our lives in order rarely pan out. Relationships to those closest to us are often conflicted by competing desires - or the dying of desire itself. In a way, the film is high-class soap opera, but as it unfolds, it manages to articulate its share of truths. Great cast and believable performances appropriately captured in a kinetic style of cinematography and editing. The DVD includes a brief interview with the director.
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Format: DVD
This is an odd little film about artistic ambition, worldly success (or lack thereof), self-worth as well as self-loathing, love, friendship, and the passage of time. The themes are clear enough, but there is no grand narrative here. In fact, the point of the film seems to be that our lives and loves are not grand narratives that resemble the books or films (that we read and try to write, or watch and try to make) but more like sketchbooks (full of false starts and incompleted/imperfect fragments and no clear momentum in any one defintive direction). Thats how these characters view themselves and their artistic efforts and their relationships and their lives and that is how this film feels---not like a finished whole but more like a series of loosely joined pages/scenes that track the self along its unplotted/unrouted course.

Assayas claims the title refers less to a time of year or life than to a state of mind, and the dominant state of mind (for all four of the main characters) is uncertainty as no one in this film has a secure income nor a secure relationship (nor a secure self-image/identity). Assayas provides us with no traditional characterization nor narrative because these characters all prefer to remain undefined and unsettled. In place of narrative, we get a series of moments filmed at six-month intervals. The moments are not particularly dramatic, they are mostly just everyday conversations but from their conversations we can tell what kind of people they are and why they act the way they do with each other. The pleasure of the film is in tracking the way the characters feel about themselves and each other over the course of a few years.
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