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Auralia's Colors: A Novel (The Auralia Thread) [Kindle Edition]

Jeffrey Overstreet
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (61 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $14.99
Kindle Price: $5.68
You Save: $9.31 (62%)
Sold by: Random House LLC

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Book Description

When thieves find an abandoned child lying in a monster’s footprint, they have no idea that their wilderness discovery will change the course of history.
 
Cloaked in mystery, Auralia grows up among criminals outside the walls of House Abascar, where vicious beastmen lurk in shadow. There, she discovers an unsettling–and forbidden–talent for crafting colors that enchant all who behold them, including Abascar’s hard-hearted king, an exiled wizard, and a prince who keeps dangerous secrets.
 
Auralia’s gift opens doors from the palace to the dungeons, setting the stage for violent and miraculous change in the great houses of the Expanse.
 
Auralia’s Colors weaves literary fantasy together with poetic prose, a suspenseful plot, adrenaline-rush action, and unpredictable characters sure to enthrall ambitious imaginations.


From the Trade Paperback edition.


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Film critic and author Overstreet (Through a Screen Darkly) offers a powerful myth for his first foray into fiction. The kingdom of Abascar is cloaked in gloom, sentenced to an ongoing wintering by a jealous queen, in which colors have been done away with and are only allowed in the royal court. But young Auralia, found as a baby by the river and raised by outcasts, has a talent for finding colors everywhere and bringing them to life in a way no one has ever seen before. The fate of the kingdom rests on what Auralia chooses to do and how the king responds. Overstreet creates a world with not only its own geography but its own vocabulary—it is haunted by beastmen, home to cloudgrasper trees, vawns (something like dinosaurs) and twister fish. There are Christian bones to the story—particularly in the mystery of the beast called the Keeper, who is always moving about, but he likes to hide just to see who'll come seeking—which may be too obvious to some and not at all clear to others. Overstreet's writing is precise and beautiful, and the story is masterfully told. Readers will be hungry for the next installment. (Sept.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

Publishers Weekly (Review, 7/16)
Film critic and author Overstreet (Through a Screen Darkly) offers a powerful myth for his first foray into fiction. The kingdom of Abascar is cloaked in gloom, sentenced to an ongoing “wintering” by a jealous queen, in which colors have been done away with and are only allowed in the royal court. But young Auralia, found as a baby by the river and raised by outcasts, has a talent for finding colors everywhere and bringing them to life in a way no one has ever seen before. The fate of the kingdom rests on what Auralia chooses to do and how the king responds. Overstreet creates a world with not only its own geography but its own vocabulary — it is haunted by beastmen, home to cloudgrasper trees, vawns (something like dinosaurs) and twister fish. ... Overstreet’s writing is precise and beautiful, and the story is masterfully told. Readers will be hungry for the next installment.


“Through word, image, and color Jeffrey Overstreet has crafted a work of art. From first to final page this original fantasy is sure to draw readers in. Auralia's Colors sparkles.”
Janet Lee Carey, award-winning author of The Beast of Noor and Dragon's Keep


“Jeffrey Overstreet’s first fantasy, Auralia’s Colors, and its heroine’s cloak of wonders take their power from a vision of art that is auroral, looking to the return of beauty, and that intends to restore spirit and and mystery to the world. The book achieves its ends by the creation of a rich, complex universe and a series of dramatic, explosive events.”
Marly Youmans, author of Ingledove and The Curse of the Raven Mocker


“In Auralia’s Colors, Overstreet masterfully extends the borders of imagination. Whereas so many writers sacrifice characterization for plot or substitute weirdness for substa...

Product Details

  • File Size: 584 KB
  • Print Length: 354 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1400072522
  • Publisher: WaterBrook Press (May 21, 2008)
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B001A0NP6A
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #167,314 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Made this Superfast Reader take it slow September 11, 2007
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I became a fan of Jeffrey Overstreet after reading his book on film, Through a Screen Darkly, and subsequently become a reader of his blog, Looking Closer. Auralia's Colors is the first in a proposed series of four, to which I say, "Bring it."

It's an astonishingly accomplished debut, and falls prey to none of the lazy traps to which fantasy writers are prone. The characters are strong, the concept and plot inventive and original, and the prose is lyrical. Here's a sample:

"The child's words, an empty chant, made Auralia recoil. A sudden fear swept over her, and she climbed off the stool, dragging the cape toward the questioner as if to save her from a chill. 'Nobody owns the colors. Can't you see? They're free. They're what trees do. They're what water and sky do. Fields. Hills. Mountains. No matter how much you give them away, there'll always be more.'"

Auralia is a fresh creation, a character that I can't compare to any I've seen in the fantasy literature I've read. She's not the stereotypical fierce hoyden or pampered princess, nor is she the wise and mystical Galadriel-type. She's a child of nature stepping into destiny with a confidently unsure step, if that makes sense. She doesn't know who she is or where she came from, but she can't deny the purpose and passions that animate her any more than the trees can deny giving their colors.

Overstreet credits Patricia McKillip's The Book of the Atrix Wolfe as an influence in his foreword, and I would say that's the author I'd most closely link him to, of the ones I've read-I've not read Guy Gavriel Kay yet, whom Overstreet also mentions.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars In a land beyond Myth September 23, 2007
Format:Paperback
At a live podcast Jeffrey Overstreet described how he came on the idea on a hike with his wife, overlooking a lake. He had an image of a woman with a coat of splendid colors, and she had come to bring it to a city where no color is allowed. He had to know her story, and so was forced to write this book.

Overstreet's wife is a poet who helped him hone every word, and it shows. Every word drips honey. This is a work of art. The fantasy is so full you have to put the book down every few minutes, to contemplate the tapestry you've been drawn into. I am transported into another land, into myth on the level of George MacDonald.

Overstreet has an ability to paint a convincing image for the people who have no color, and then bring to life unknown colors through sheer description. He has a phenomenal commitment to true fantasy, and not the humdrum of today that exists merely as a dry husk of a once great genre. Overstreet's very names evoke new thought and let your mind ride the winds of imagination.

The book ends well, answering all questions, and yet leaving much unanswered as future hope. I want more, and am thankful there are three more books coming. Yet I felt satisfied at the end of this book, as after a good meal. But it was not merely my literary palate that was satisfied. For there are depths upon depths in Overstreet, and the spirit is stretched as well, through labyrinthian pathways of unexpected discovery.

Don't wait. Don't walk. Run, and get this book, and know what true pleasure is.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Important Contribution to Christian Fantasy January 21, 2008
By Becky
Format:Paperback
Some book reviews are harder than others. This is such a one: Auralia's Colors, first in the Auralia's Thread series by Jeffrey Overstreet (WaterBrook). Mind you, the book has many merits and has received numbers of complimentary reviews. So my difficulty in reviewing Auralia's Colors is not because I think it lacks merit. The truth is, I admire the book ... but I don't love it. I wanted to. I wish I did. But perhaps others of you will.

The Place. The story is set in a location known as The Expanse. The area was divided into four houses, each with it's own set of governing customs and rules. One of the houses, Cent Regus, was poisoned when its people meddled with magic. Now they have devolved into beastmen who attack and raid citizens of the other houses. In the particular House our story is concerned with, those caught committing a crime, if not imprisoned or executed, are condemned to become gatherers living in camps outside the protective walls--and therefore vulnerable to attack. Because of a ruling made by the Queen of the House, it is now against the law for average citizens to own anything colorful.

The Story. Two thieves going about their duties as gatherers discover an abandoned baby girl. They take her into their camp where she grows up. Eventually she tells them her name is Auralia, though she doesn't know how she knows this or where she came from.

Soon she displays remarkable independence, going off into the forest on her own where she finds colors. From the things she finds in nature, she weaves colorful hats, scarves, and the like.

When these items are discovered by the king's men, trouble is afoot.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Auralia taught me to live courageously.
As an artist I naturally identified with Auralia's appreciation for color and creation, as well as the challenges she faces throughout the story. Read more
Published 12 days ago by Karenee
5.0 out of 5 stars Won't Be Disappointed
Fantastic start to the series. Rich characters, setting, and the story line and pacing forces you to read until you can no longer keep your eyes open. Read more
Published 5 months ago by Amazon Customer
3.0 out of 5 stars The series starts to fall apart by volume 3
I really enjoyed the first two of the four volumes, book three is a little disappointing and book four is a complete disaster. Read more
Published 7 months ago by Lucesociator
4.0 out of 5 stars A great intro
I first read Cyndere and was led to this beginning book of what appears to be more than a trilogy. I really liked it and will definitely follow this author.
Published 8 months ago by grammadee
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful, enthralling book
I just finished reading the 4th book, but don't worry, no spoilers here. I will say that the series continues to grow richer, deeper, more enchanting, and more gripping through... Read more
Published 9 months ago by Kathleen Hanson
5.0 out of 5 stars Gorgeous.
Overstreet's descriptive writing is so absolutely luscious and beautiful. I can't think of a writer who can top him in this category. Gorgeous, gorgeous prose.
Published 11 months ago by cleansingavenger
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing!
Love it!
every page was filled with allegoric passion.
Jeffery Overstreet truly is a master.
Can't wait to read the other books.
Published 13 months ago by sam
4.0 out of 5 stars Auralia's Colors
This was quite a long read for me, it lost my interest a few times, but overall it was quite good. I think it would make a better movie than a book though. :)
Published 16 months ago by Alyssa Greatbanks
5.0 out of 5 stars I loved this book!
I had never read any of Jeffrey Overstreet's books before. This was a gift to me and so I decided to start it. I was very pleasantly surprised at how much I liked this book! Read more
Published 17 months ago by H. Johnston
5.0 out of 5 stars A beautiful book that bridges between Teen and Adult
This is a very beautiful book and well written.
It is one of those books to sit back and relax and enjoy the ride. Read more
Published 20 months ago by Michael W Buehler
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More About the Author

Jeffrey Overstreet is the author of The Auralia Thread, a four-volume fantasy series that includes "Auralia's Colors," "Cyndere's Midnight," "Raven's Ladder," and "The Ale Boy's Feast." He also writes about art and culture at LookingCloser.org, and his "memoir of dangerous moviegoing" is a book called "Through a Screen Darkly." Jeffrey's film reviews are published at ImageJournal.org twice monthly, and at Filmwell.org. In the past, he has written for Paste, Christianity Today, and various other periodicals. He regularly lectures at universities and conferences around the country, on many subjects including Storytelling, Fantasy, Play, and Film Interpretation. He lives in Shoreline, Washington, and works as the contributing editor for Seattle Pacific University's magazine Response.

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