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Auschwitz and After Paperback – 1995

ISBN-13: 978-0300070576 ISBN-10: 0300070578 Edition: Reprint

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 354 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press; Reprint edition (1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300070578
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300070576
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #486,952 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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An amazingly written poetic book about such a depressing subject.
Penelope H. Ford
You must understand what was endured, and this book puts a reality to it more than any other.
Christy Beem
I had to read this book for a class I had in college, and I absolutely loved it.
cristy89

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Kathryn L Schnaible on May 23, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is a translation of the famous postwar trilogy of Charlotte Delbo, a French Resistance fighter who was caught and sent to Auschwitz, then transferred to Ravensbruck. She was, and is, quite well-known in France. Though she is now deceased, the translator, Rosette Lamont, knew Delbo personally and is the foremost expert on her work, having written a number of articles on Delbo. Another who has written sensitively about Delbo is Nathan Bracher. Like all translations, there is a little something lost in the English rendering. If you are able to read the French, the original titles are "Aucun de nous ne reviendra," "Une connaissance inutile," and "Mesure de nos jours." Other books by Delbo you might find interesting are "La Memoire et les Jours," and "Le convoi du 24 janvier." She also wrote a number of plays, and poetry that isn't in this trilogy.
Thanks to the work of the Video Archive for Holocaust Testimony at Yale University, the Survivors of the Shoah project by Steven Spielberg, and the efforts of the new National Holocaust Museum, there is no shortage of testimony from Jewish survivors of the Holocaust. But Jews were not the only victims of the Nazi regime, and there is surprisingly little testimony from non-Jewish survivors. Delbo is probably the only non-Jewish victim who became an important literary figure in the postwar era, and her position as victim along with her eloquent indictment of Christianity and Christian culture for their complicity in the extermination of the Jewish victims with whom she feels strong kinship and empathy make her work an absolutely unique contribution to post-Holocaust literature. Feel free to e-mail me at schnaibl@fas.harvard.edu for more bibliographical references.
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36 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Kindle Customer on August 22, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The other two reviews are so insightful and accurate, in my opinion, I should have little to add. Yet, after reading "Auschwitz and After", I felt I had to express something of how the book made me understand and grow. As a convert to Judaism (born in 1951, I was on the pathway my whole life, I realize now), I have read many, many books/memoirs/histories on the Holocaust. Many of them have been very moving, indeed, beginning with Anne Frank's Diary, on through to "Maus". Though I acknowledge that these words have been said before, I still believe that Charlotte Delbo's words put me into that Hell more than any other survivor's testimony to date. Delbo's words do more than say "this happened and that happened". They are poetry...yet how can poetry apply to any experience in a death camp? Surprisingly, scarily, the poetry transports the reader there more truly than any film, any historical analysis, even better than any well-written survivor account. At first I thought I would not like it; my sensibilities were offended that someone would write in poetic format about an experience at a death camp ("Maus" was different; it was a cartoon, yes, but drawn by the son of a survivor, not a survivor). After finishing Delbo's triology, I feel that her words (not all in poetic form) made me understand as much as anyone who did not experience a death camp, how it felt, how one survived, what one endured when one "came back" to the "real world".
Due to the passage of time, we are losing the remaining Holocaust survivors. Hence, Spielberg's and others' efforts to record the testimony before it is too late.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 18, 1999
Format: Paperback
I have never read a book on the topic of the Holocaust that grasped it quite as well as this one has. Other books make the Holocaust sound 'too good' compared to her stories and accounts that are portrayed in this book. If you want to get a real grasp or feel of the Holocaust experience in a poetic and creatively written path, then this is a book you should read. Also, for anybody interested in the Holocaust, this is a definite must. It is basically as true and real as an account on the Holocaust can possibly get. It is simply an amazing piece of work.
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By Christy Beem on July 18, 2014
Format: Paperback
"Try to look. Just try and see," Delbo writes, a repeating refrain.

It ought to go without saying, but this book is not a fun read. It hurts, and it should. This book will leave you drained emotionally, and that is the only proper reaction to it. Delbo (through translator Rosette C. Lamont) conveys emotion like no other Holocaust survivor I have read. She does not tell you it hurt, she shows you. You feel pain, and you know it is only the smallest fraction of the pain she felt.

I believe this account is also crucial for its telling of the camaraderie, the sistership, amongst the female prisoners. Friendship can do so much for a soul living in anguish, but losing that friend to death hurts it more than solitude ever could.

This book hurts. But it must be known, it must be read. You must understand what was endured, and this book puts a reality to it more than any other. Try to look.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One of the most moving books on the Holocaust ever written, and I've read my fair share. Between her stories, diary-like recounts, and poems, it's no wonder Saul Bellow said, "We have seen so many Holocaust documents that we cannot be blamed for saying, 'Oh, God! Not another!' This one, however, I could not resist." Her varying style and attention to details skimmed over in other documents, this book is perfect for those who can't get any more depressed already, and wish to know more about the non-Jewish side of the Holocaust.
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