The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and The Gospel of We... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$6.26
Qty:1
  • List Price: $6.95
  • Save: $0.69 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 14 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and The Gospel of Wealth (Signet Classics) Mass Market Paperback – November 7, 2006


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$6.26
$2.62 $2.49
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"




Frequently Bought Together

The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and The Gospel of Wealth (Signet Classics) + Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr.
Price for both: $19.44

Buy the selected items together
  • Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. $13.18

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Good Girl" by Mary Kubica.

Product Details

  • Series: Signet Classics
  • Mass Market Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Signet Classics (November 7, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451530381
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451530387
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.3 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #105,552 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Andrew Carnegie emigrated from Scotland to the United States in 1848 at the age of 13. At age 65 he sold the Carnegie Steel Company to JP Morgan for $480 million and devoted the rest of his life to writing and philanthropy.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
13
4 star
9
3 star
3
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 26 customer reviews
The rise of Andrew Carnegie is an amazing story that everybody can learn from.
Patrick Bateman
I read this book as a recommendation from the book "Success through a positive mental attitude" and it is a good read.
Peter Kowalski
Carnegie exemplifies what one hopes to find among great men; integrity, honesty, hard work, and a passion for profit.
TW

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By TW VINE VOICE on April 15, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Andrew Carnegie offers an intriguing look into his life story that chronicles his ancestry in Scotland to his journey from child to business tycoon in the US. Carnegie writes in a style applicable to the times, thus there is inevitably a period of acclimatization with the material; however, within a short period of familiarizing yourself with this style of English, you will find it hardly represents an encumbrance.

Carnegie has a knack for being very productive with his abilities as well as often finding himself in the right place and time. Much of his success could be perceived as lucky; however, it will not take long for any reader to see that the effects of his always going the extra mile permitted Carnegie to stand out as a result of his own principles, hardly dependant on luck.

Carnegie exemplifies what one hopes to find among great men; integrity, honesty, hard work, and a passion for profit. Carnegie's giant success is only matched by his good will to human kind. Carnegie explains his thoughts on why he felt the most immoral thing a man can do is to die rich, thus he spent his retirement giving as much of his wealth away as possible. The evidence of Carnegie's lasting name and historical significance provides ample reason to read this Carnegie autobiography. His candidness and honest approach make this book even better.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Peter Kowalski on June 26, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I read this book as a recommendation from the book "Success through a positive mental attitude" and it is a good read. It is a bit slow at first and its written in an older style of English. Once you pick up the style though the book becomes very interesting, I often read it before sales calls to motivate myself.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By John Taiman on February 27, 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book with the idea of getting some insight as to how Mr. Carnegie made his investment decisions. There was some of that, but he mainly talks about his dealings with the rich and powerful of his time.

He rubbed elbows with the wealthy and politicians (including presidents) both in America and abroad. It gets a little tiring after awhile reading about his interactions with these people (thus the lower rating). It is like reading his diary. However, it does give you a feel for the culture at that time.

What I find with autobiographies is that the authors usually portray themselves in the best light. This book is no different. He likes to identify himself as a friend of the worker, which he tried to be. There was a strike at his plant in which workers were killed. He blamed that on his manager because it happened while he was abroad. I've read in other places that there is skepticism about that.

He also gives his thoughts on philanthropy in his The Gospel of Wealth chapter at the end of the book. He gave away millions to establish libraries. He believes in the estate tax because, as he says it, "By taxing estates heavily at death the State (his capitalization) marks its condemnation of the selfish millionaire's unworthy life" (page 330). He says that the rich should give their money away to charitable institutions during their lifetime because the rich would know how it should best be distributed, and that the money should not be given in small sums to individuals because they would not, in general, know how to spend it wisely (I'm assuming because they would also be rich if they knew how to spend it). There was very much the paternal feeling I got when I read J.P. Morgan's biography - the wealthy are stewards of capital because the common people can not be trusted with it.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By M BRINSLEY on August 15, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Andrew Carnegie was a man of deadly focus, superhuman energy, and fierce intelligence. Lay down the book and you can hear his steady voice, setting forth in spare, lucid prose the studied steps and happy fortuities by which he reached his pinnacle, driven by dogged industry, breathless ambition, native wit, daring and innovation. We watch over his shoulder, as he builds his empire, one brick at a time, his magical ascent seemingly guided by the hand of providence. As we succumb to the charisma of the man himself, we get a growing feeling of invincibility, of an age when genius might always be turned into gold. Difficulties, obstacles, conundrums--problems that would fell the ordinary mortal--all seemed to vanish at his touch. The story is inspiring, humbling, and totally consuming. I could not put it down.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy Gislason on October 10, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I've recently read a very inspiring book titled, "The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and his essay The Gospel of Wealth.

Reading this was like stepping back into time as it was all written by Andrew himself in his private diaries around 100 - 150 years ago. Compelling work of history, family, business and ethics all combined into one 336 page book.

I find it pretty humbling to find out that he was once the second riches man in the country, only to give away his entire fortune to charities at the end of his life and after his passing on. This man made fortunes then proceeded to give away most of his $350,000,000 in wealth.

He opened thousands of libraries, music halls and parks for the public to enjoy. These were great feats in his time as there were not many libraries around 150 years ago. Nowadays of course you can find one in most every town and city in developed countries.

His philosophies on creating the best products, providing outstanding customer service and doing business with partners is really insiteful to read. Pretty amazing to think he started out at $1.20 a week as a teen to go on to amass one of the largest fortunes in America in his time.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?