Autoportrait and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$11.66
Qty:1
  • List Price: $12.95
  • Save: $1.29 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Monday, April 21? Order within and choose Two-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Autoportrait Paperback


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.66
$7.39 $6.45

Frequently Bought Together

Autoportrait + Suicide (French Literature Series)
Price for both: $22.79

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 120 pages
  • Publisher: Dalkey Archive Press; 1 edition (March 15, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1564787079
  • ISBN-13: 978-1564787071
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #734,090 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Bookforum

A work of genius . . . gracefully translated by Lorin Stein. —Wayne Koestenbaum

About the Author

Edouard Levé was born on January 1, 1965 in Neuilly-sur-Seine. A writer, photographer, and visual artist, Levé was the author of four books of writing—Oeuvres, Journal, Autoportrait, and Suicide—and three books of photographs. Suicide, published in 2008, was his final book.

Lorin Stein is former senior editor at Farrar, Straus, and Giroux where he worked closely with many notable authors. He has also worked on translations of Roberto Bolaño, as well as personally translating the fiction of Grégoire Bouillier. He is the editor of the Paris Review.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Ettner on March 18, 2012
Format: Paperback
Currently there is no "Click to LOOK INSIDE" option for Édouard Levé's AUTOPORTRAIT here on Amazon, as there is for his final book, Suicide (French Literature Series). That's unfortunate. While it's easy enough to describe AUTOPORTRAIT's singular construction -- one long paragraph containing a string of over 3000 declarative sentences about the author himself -- it is difficult to predict the effect the book will have on any individual reader.

You might find it a profound statement of the unknowability of another human being. You might find it a source of amusement, as it sometimes reads like a parody of a personal ad (with such declarations as "I consent to feeling moved by sunsets" and "I like rain in the summer") while at other times it mimics the bon mots of a deadpan standup comic ("After I get a haircut, my hair's too short"). But it's very possible you'll find only frustration in pages that are self-indulgent to the Nth degree. Some will say Levé's a bore.

So this may be helpful: The online edition of the Spring 2011 issue (No. 196) of The Paris Review contains a substantial excerpt from the text. The piece is entitled, "When I look at a strawberry, I think of a tongue." In it the book's translator, Lorin Stein, has assembled about ten percent of AUTOPORTRAIT's sentences and laid them out in an easier to experience paragraphed format. He begins his excerpt with the first sentence that appears in the book, and ends with the book's final sentence, but otherwise rearranges bits internally. Not that this matters, as there's no arc and no direction in AUTOPORTRAIT. Treating its sentences to a game of 52-card-pickup is not mistreatment; it works just fine. To find the material online, Google the words, Paris Review Autoportrait.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By friedsparrow on January 2, 2013
Format: Paperback
I started reading this book because my best friend was threatening suicide. Edouard Leve wrote a novel called "Suicide" and then committed suicide himself shortly after turning in the manuscript. "Autoportrait" was shelved next to that in the bookstore I went to, and as I opened it it was so compelling that I came back to the same bookstore on three different occasions to finish the book (because I'm a cheap bastard). It is autobiography in its most pared-down, vivid and poetic form. The portrait that emerges is overwhelmingly real, sad, poignant, precious, and enigmatic... because Leve does not go into explanations, he only makes declarations.

It is difficult to describe this book, or the effect upon reading it. But I loved it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
Leve is sort of a literary pointillist, his short, declarative statements slowly build up a sense of who he is without ever eliding the individual sentences or hijacking them for some larger narrative project. This might sound insane, but I think this book is actually timeless. It's so straight forward, so basically sincere that it's hard to not imagine someone reading this in 1000 years and being able to get inside his sense of himself as well as someone can in 2013, its blend of the banal and the profound is perfect. If this was 1200 pages long, I don't think I'd be bored by it
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I almost gave this book four stars until I saw the heap of adjectives that has been dumped on it in praise. It's one of those books, like Joe Brainard's "I Remember" that will have you thinking, "I could have done this. If only I'd thought of it first." But of course, you didn't think of it first. (Of course that hasn't kept several people from writing their own versions of Brainard's book.) Anyway, for page after page the writer tells you what he likes and dislikes, what he has done, what he thinks of doing, what he owns, etc. etc. Once in a while there are two or three sentences which "dwell" on the same subject, but mostly it's just statements on different subjects, one after the other. In a way it's an ego trip, as is often suicide in a way, another of the writer's accomplishments. It's interesting enough to keep me reading, and I enjoy agreeing or disagreeing or learning about some things in this man's life. But it's no masterpiece.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Timo on March 18, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read Leve's Suicide before this and bought it after learning of its existence. Written in first person, it is a fantastic look into Leve's mind and above all, his lyricism. It is haunting. It is beautiful. It is his photograph.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search
ARRAY(0xa3397bac)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?