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on August 28, 2009
I read this book in preparation for a trip to England and a visit to Glastonbury. This is a well written and thoughtful book that gives the reader a very comprehensive history of the Glastonbury area. It's a nice balance of traditional science and alternative archaeology, and I felt that my experience when I visited was enhanced from having read this book first. I highly recommend that anyone planning a visit here read this book! Or, if you are interested in ancient British cultures and/or the Arthur legends or the book The Mists of Avalon, this will certainly interest you.
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VINE VOICEon November 6, 2010
The mystical Isle of Avalon, where the Lady of the Lake guards Excalibur and the evil Melwas keeps Guinevere a prisoner underneath the Tor; Nicholas Mann, historian and author, explores its legendary mysteries by examining the physical features of place in the context of its mythology, history, and religious significance. Mann is obviously enthralled with Glastonbury, and while he does a through and creditable job relating the factual evidence, he is also prone to conjecture. Goddesses and druids, magical springs and ley lines, dragons and labyrinths all have their place in this book. But the author generally differentiates clearly between what is known and what is imagined, and this book is recommended to anyone interested in Celtic mythology and ancient religions.
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on January 12, 2007
I have not yet finished this book, as it does take awhile to read. It is very informative and has a lot of intersting facts about this Avalon and Glastonbury; however, it can be difficult to read.
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on January 18, 2014
Excellent book! Exploring Avalon and the present-day Glastonbury in such a fantastic way. I enjoyed this one a lot and would definitely recommend it to others :)
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on May 23, 2013
read it in 2 days. I could not put it down. A must read. I loved it what can I say. That is why I chose the rating.
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on November 12, 2009
I found this book a delight to read! The way it brings the landscape of Glastonbury to life is amazing. A must have for anyone studying the Glastonbury sites or who has an interest in Avalon
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on June 18, 2009
Avalon is probably the most thorough study of Glastonbury, from the very beginning of its history to modern times. Mann covers a bit of everything, from the strange theories to geology and everything in between. An easy and interesting read. He does go off his path a bit in the appendix where he tries to get philosophical and it's clear he has a particular religious bias. His understanding of Christian history & theology seems a bit limited, which is surprising considering the rest of the book. He claims that the "duality of good and evil" did not arise in Western thought until later times. Perhaps he should read Genesis.

Christianity has a very spiritual side that rivals the mystics of the pagans. Often the pagan mysticism is presented as being simple and can include anything. I tend to think some turn to paganism because they don't know of the spiritual side of Christianity and don't like that Christianity doesn't promise to be an easy, blissful religion in the sense that most people understand. That's not a slight against pagans, but there is a lot of misinformation out there about Christians, though sadly there are plenty of Christians who have tried to dumb it down themselves.

For your Britain studies, see also Ley Lines,The Holy Kingdom and Stonehenge Complete.
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