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The Awakening and Selected Stories of Kate Chopin (Enriched Classics) Mass Market Paperback – Deluxe Edition, July 1, 2004


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Product Details

  • Series: Enriched Classics
  • Mass Market Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; Enriched Classic edition (July 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743487672
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743487672
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 0.9 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #111,939 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Kate Chopin (1850–1904) was born in St. Louis. She moved to Louisiana where she wrote two novels and numerous stories. Because The Awakening was widely condemned, publication of Chopin’s third story collection was cancelled. The Awakening was rediscovered by scholars in the 1960s and 1970s and is her best-known work.

--This text refers to an alternate Mass Market Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By J. Jacobs VINE VOICE on April 10, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Stories include: (Wiser Than a god, A Point at Issue!, A Shameful Affair, Miss McEnders, At the 'Cadian Ball, Desiree's baby, Madame Celestin's Divorce, A Lady of Bayou St. John, La Belle Zoraide A Respectable Woman, The Story of an Hour, Regret, The Kiss, Athenaise, A Pair of Silk Stockings, The Storm, Charlie). Some of the short stories seem repetitive, but The Awakening is wonderful, especially considering when it was written and how much Chopin went through as a result of publishing this scandalous tale. She tells the story of a woman realizing her sexuality and the feminist ideas she conveys are far ahead of her time.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Lyn Bann on June 26, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
At the start of the novel, Mrs Pontellier is experiencing the awakening of her consciousness: she is beginning to recognize her relations as an individual to the world within and about her. Her husband, a man of forty, regards her as a valuable piece of personal property. And yet she is the sole "object" of his existence. Why does she seem so little interested in things which concern him? Does she not value his conversation? A vague anguish in Mrs Pontellier is a symptom of something dark developing within. Is this unfamiliar feeling the sign of an inner revolt against Fate? What is the force behind the creation and the dispelling of our moods?

As a young woman of twenty-eight, Edna Pontellier finds herself pondering on the nature of female wisdom. Is it about posing as a mother-as-angel in the home or is there something more? Can a new world be created in front of her, different from the one in which she had been living? Can a woman have access to a kind of wisdom belonging to the spirit, that only men had been previously vouchsafed? Edna is learning the pleasure of getting lost in the maze of inner contemplation. She wants to learn whether life has been the result of accident or the decree of Fate.

The moon, the sea water and Chopin seem to cast a mystic spell upon her soul. Exulting with these feelings, she aims to conquer her own self, a feat prohibited to women at the time. The winter after the summer holidays at Grand Isle, and after her "friend" Robert has gone to Mexico, Edna Pontellier has already given certain steps towards the delirium of selfhood she craves for: she will only do as she pleases, and what she pleases the most is art. Is she not growing a little unbalanced mentally? For her, art is ultimately related to the rights of women.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By KaylaOh on September 21, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Five stars! This book was wonderfully priced and came within two days! In 'like new' condition. No regrets at all. I will definitely buy again.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By CSL on January 5, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Imagine being a woman living in the south in the late 1800's. You are married, have two children and very comfortable life style--one might argue your life is near perfect. Overtime you come to realize that your life is not fulfilling. Reading Kate Chopin's short story The Awakening will take the reader through a personal passage in a woman's life when options were very limited. Even more astounding is the story was written and published during the time when the story takes place--scandalous.

The other stories in this book will also give the reader insights into the life and times of people living in New Orleans. They too are engaging.
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13 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Miss Sophia on November 12, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Critics during the 1899 gave Kate Chopin's "The Awakening" bad reviews. They were shock at the novel because of the issues that Chopin wrote about. Chopin was devasted; she died never writing again. "The Awakening" was revived by feminist critics that knew the work was facinating, also beautifully written and compose. Now, high schools and college across America read "The Awakening".
The Awakening is about a woman named Edna Pontellier. Edna is unhappy in her life as a mother and wife. She starts to "awaken" from her conventional role of mother and wife to a woman that desires independence to become an individual. Edna does not love her husband nor she wants to be a mother to her two sons.
Edna falls in love with Robert Leburn; Robert goes away to Mexico because he wants to stay away from Edna. He knows that they both have feelings for each other, and he leaves because Edna's reputation will be destroyed if they have a love affair. After Robert leaves, she purchases a quaint little house on the corner; she decides that she needs space away from her wifely and motherly duties. While Robert is gone, Edna has an affair with womanizer, Alcee Abouron.
Robert comes back from Mexico; Edna is glad to see him and wants to rekindle the love that they discovered before he left. Edna is called by her friend, Adele, because she is having her baby.
Edna discovers that she cannot awaken fully from society conventions and restraints that are placed on her. She realizes if there was a way that Robert and her could be together, eventually, he would stop loving her. She realizes during her time society will not let her be the woman that she wants and needs to be.
"The Awakening" is about a woman that experiences and realizes that her life is complexed. As Edna struggles to find her identity, she has a wall against her, and it is called conventions.
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By Selena#1 on October 12, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
I promise to be brutally honest with my opinion, but it should not be taken as fact. Any reader should read it for themselves, before they decide if this book has any merit or not. Do not judge this book biased solely on my opinion. If you do, you might miss out on a great read. You never know. It could happen.

1. Strong Main Character/ Female Heroine: Edna is definitely what one would call a strong woman in the 1800s. She married her husband after being infatuated with the idea of him and to disobey her father and sister. She is an independent woman, who wants to take her life back and have a crush on a younger man, but she neglects her children in the process. Edna could have had both. She could have had her lover Robert on the side, while still be a mother to her children. Plenty of modern day parents stay married only for their children and have lovers on the side. I am not saying that that is the right way to go, but it is better than the alternative. [ Edna commits suicide, because she cannot escape her marriage and be with Robert. (hide spoiler)] 3 out of 5 stars

2. Strong Minor Characters: There is only four main people in this book that could be called minor characters. Edna’s husband is one of them. He is obsessed with wealth and his possessions. He views his wife and his children as his possessions as well that should be admired by the rest of society. Chopin introduces the concept of conspicuous consumption, which is the idea that men in those times showed off their wealth by showering their wives with precious jewels and the latest fashions. They bought mansions and decorate them fabulously. They go on expensive vacations and hire many servants to do the daily house duties. Robert is a caring young man, who is imaginative and very adventurous.
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