Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.com (US).
  
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Béla Bartók... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Disc Course
Condition: Used: Very Good
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $1.10
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Béla Bartók: Concerto for Viola & Orchestra / Peter Eötvös: Replica / György Kurtág: Movement for Viola & Orchestra - Kim Kashkashian
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Béla Bartók: Concerto for Viola & Orchestra / Peter Eötvös: Replica / György Kurtág: Movement for Viola & Orchestra - Kim Kashkashian


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Listen Instantly with Amazon Music Album
Other Formats & Versions Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, June 13, 2000
"Please retry"
$19.61
$19.61 $8.25
$19.61 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Béla Bartók: Concerto for Viola & Orchestra / Peter Eötvös: Replica / György Kurtág: Movement for Viola & Orchestra - Kim Kashkashian + Kurtag, Ligeti: Music For Viola
Price for both: $38.93

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Amazon.com

Kim Kashkashian's interpretation of three Hungarian composers' works for viola is peerless. The viola is a perplexing, complex instrument that always seems out of time, almost out of place with the modern repertory. But the melancholy and directness of the instrument, especially in the hands of such an accomplished performer as Kashkashian, make for a listening experience that is profoundly contemporary. Bartók's Concerto for Viola and Orchestra was one of the last pieces the composer wrote. In a sense unfinished, fragmentary (Paul Griffiths, in his liner notes, says the piece is "partial, imminent, not yet arrived"), the work is balanced by Eötvös's Replica, written especially for Kashkashian and recorded here for the first time. Kurtág's Movement, his graduation exercise presented to the Liszt Academy in Budapest in 1954, has a clear Bartókian hue, but also shows the influence of Brahms and Haydn. While it is a youthful work, it is no minor piece and, especially in the context of Kurtág's usual miniatures, is a fascinating listening experience. Eötvös shows himself to be a wonderful director, drawing from Kashkashian a precision and subtlety that the masculine viola sometimes lacks, while encouraging the Netherlands Radio Chamber Orchestra to support the fullest exploration of the pieces in hand. This is a remarkable, beautiful, and haunting recording. --Mark Thwaite

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
listen  1. Bartók: Concerto for Viola and Orchestra, op.post. - Version: Tibor Serly - 1. Moderato - Lento parlando14:39Album Only
listen  2. Bartók: Concerto for Viola and Orchestra, op.post. - Version: Tibor Serly - 2. Adagio religioso - Allegretto 4:32$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  3. Bartók: Concerto for Viola and Orchestra, op.post. - Version: Tibor Serly - 3. Allegro vivace 4:19$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  4. Eötvös: Replica14:37Album Only
listen  5. Kurtág: Movement For Viola And Orchestra11:59Album Only

Product Details

  • Orchestra: Netherlands Radio Chamber Orchestra
  • Conductor: Peter Eotvos
  • Composer: Bela Bartok, Peter Eotvos, Gyorgy Kurtag
  • Audio CD (June 13, 2000)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: ECM
  • ASIN: B00004T3XF
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #62,620 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 10 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Marcus Maroney on June 19, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Another fabulous disc from Kim Kashkashian, in Hungarian music for viola and orchestra. Kashkashian produces a dark, haunting tone that fits each work perfectly, and Peter Eotvos and the Dutch orchestra inhabit a complementary sound world, and the recording is up to the usual ECM standards (wide dynamic range, transparent orchestral texture, slight spotlight on the soloist). The Bartok concerto, admirably 'prepared' by Tibor Serly, is, in my opinion, the weakest on the disc. There are, as typical in Bartok, beautiful, rustic melodies in the same rhetoric as the 3rd piano concerto. This would have been an amazing piece had Bartok finished it. Serly did what he could, but we are still left with, as Paul Griffiths says in his excellent liner notes, "a world only partly defined." Eotvos' piece is very strong. The arrangement of the orchestra would perhaps be more apparante aurally in a live performance, but in certain instances (the last few minutes of the work, for example), the spatial ideas come across nicely. Overall, the work's sound world is very convincing , the orchestration unique and involving, and the performance riveting. The Kurtag work, from his student days (no date of composition is given in the liner notes) is very Bartokian, and, having listened to it first before reading the liner notes, I was worried that this master composer had suffered from a severe bout of Pendereckitis (reverting to conservative, proto-Brahms modernism). The piece definitely contrasts all other Kurtag that I know (the song cycles, double concerto, Jatekok, etc), and is on a much larger scale than all those.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By scarecrow VINE VOICE on June 30, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The references here(other reviewers) to minor works, minor as compared to what or who?? The opaque Question,the Big Unknown.

This is all great music,(even though I disliked marginally the Kurtag). All the music here sensitively played and interpreted with imagination. With Peter Eotvos you have one of the most gifted(aggressive) musical visions,technicians, a man of passion as well. All the categories for egocentric analysis is here clarity,relevance,precision, depth; the ensemble balance he brings from the Netherlands Radio Orchestra is astounding. We merely think this level of interpretation is a norm now these performances,with students of Pierre Boulez (as Eotvos) but Eotvos,recall; all the experience he has under-his-belt now with contemporary repertoire.He lends another vision to the Bartok,one I had not heard. He scales down the obvious,the folk gestures are subdued in place of the fascination with the timbre of the work, the modernity of the score is affirmed. The Viola is unencumbered throughout,and I suspect the incompletedness of the work gave it more clarity,and more modern interest,so it is sketchlike,perhpas unfinsished ideas not allowed to develop; let's not be naive, Bartok had good days and bad, and he was losing creative focus in his latter concerti, like the "Third Piano Concerto" is a waste of time.Now living in poverty outside New York City in an old wooden shak,he was demorilized.
I suspect all serious Violists marvel at the fact that they have this work, It is a high point in the literature.In Searly's completion,you barely suspect any dramatic differences,or how the work should have been, could have been, Bartok's aesthetic is fairly predictable, he had his creative "comfort zones" that he frequently visited.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jon Byrne on February 26, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Kim Kashkashian's recording of the Bartok Viola Concerto is the best I have heard. It helped me when getting a sense of the piece before I started working on it. The Replica, and The Movement for Viola and Orchestra where two piece I had never heard of before now I enjoy them, and can't wait to play them!!!
-Jon
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Audio CD
Kim Kashkashian offers a beautiful rendition of Bartok's Viola Concerto, albeit a problematic one. She plays with a big, plush tone reminiscent of commissioner and premiere performer's William Primrose (it is available on CD from Bartokrecords, and is an essential building block of any serious Bartok record collection), with no trace of coarseness or even huskiness. But, following the lead of Primrose but radicalizing it considerably, she and Eötvös take an unusually expansive and brooding view of the first movement. So had Wolfram Christ with Ozawa in 1989 (Béla Bartók: Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta / Viola Concerto - Wolfram Christ / Berliner Philharmoniker / Seiji Ozawa), but Kashkashian is even more extreme, fussing a little more on the phrases (listen to her "precipitato" descent at 0:49, which she starts very slowly). Eötvös contributes, with very mellow phrasings of the orchestral outbursts, like the short string fugato at 1:15, making it sound flaccid rather than biting, or the woodwind flourish at 2:45 that introduces a big brass fanfare; you just need to compare with Ozawa at 2:32 to hear the difference between "gentle" and "exciting".

And there lies the problem. Within a similarly brooding approach, Christ and Ozawa knew how to animate imperceptibly so to make the outbursts urgent and biting: Kashkashian and Eötvös keep the movement expansive and brooding.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category