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BEEZUS AND RAMONA BY BEVERLY CLEARY Paperback – January 1, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 195 pages
  • Publisher: Reillustrated Harper Trophy Edition (2006)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B001R8JGOK
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (142 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,573,042 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Beverly Cleary's birthday, April 12th, is celebrated across the country on D.E.A.R. Day, with activities related to the Drop Everything and Read Program. One of the most popular and honored authors of all time, Beverly Cleary has won the Newbery Medal for Dear Mr. Henshaw, and both Ramona Quimby, Age 8 and Ramona and Her Father have been named Newbery Honor Books. She makes her home in coastal California.

Customer Reviews

This book is funny an fun to read.
Jack semke
While I still love the books, she is too young for 8 year old Beezus having a younger sister who is her age, especially since my granddaughter has a younger sister.
Life in Progress
I'd hear him laughing out loud, so I think if Ramona's antics can make a kid like him scream with happiness, surely it's a book for boys as much as girls!
LMreviewer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By slomamma on December 27, 2001
Format: Paperback
I read my daughter Beverly Cleary's Ramona the Pest last year, when she was in kindergarten (because in that book Ramona is also a kindergartner) and she instantly pronounced it her favorite chapter book of all time.
We've since been reading all the Ramona books, but we skipped this one for awhile. It's the first in the series, and takes place when Ramona is four years old. I knew from reviews that if focused more on Ramona's older, more serious sister, Beezus, and wasn't a "real" Ramona Quimby book. I somehow thought it would not be as funny as the others.
I was wrong. Ramona is even more exuberant in this book than in any of the others we've read, and her antics are hilarious. Seeing everything through the eyes of her serious sister does not make it one bit less funny.
But this is not just a funny book. It deals gently and honestly with the difficulty Beezus has in loving her sometimes exasperating little sister. Beezus and Ramona is more than forty years old, but I donÕt think anyone has ever come close to Beverly Cleary's ability to capture and sympathize with children's feelings. Cleary brings everything around to a happy, but entirely believable ending in this warm, wise book.
My daughter says this is her second favorite Ramona book (after Ramona the Pest), but so far it's my very favorite.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By M. Hind on July 31, 2002
Format: Paperback
I have two younger sisters and I know the kind of trouble they can cause and how exasperating they can be. When I first read this book, I was in third grade. I'm 22 now, and I have read the book at least 20 times since then. Beverly Cleary's book tend to contain such true-to-life values that they remain timeless.
Beezus is the older sister, the responsible and smart one. Ramona is the precocious little sister, creative but messy, cute but needy. Beezus struggles with being nice and trying to entertain Ramona and trying to be firm with her at the same time. There are some great little stories in this book about Ramona's misadventures including her unwavering love for a certain picture book, her locking Henry Huggins' dog in the bathroom, and her deciding that she wants to throw a party for herself without asking her mother. Things finally come to a head at Beezus' birthday party. When attention-starved Ramona gets a little too obnoxious, she shamefully admits that she just doesn't love her little sister all the time.
Herein lies the lesson: Beezus' mother explains that Beezus is not expected to love Ramona all the time, that Ramona will do things that get on her nerves sometimes. But there will also be good times when the two will get along, work together, or share a laugh. And those are the moments that count in the sisterly bond. I have stuck to this mantra when trying to deal with my own two younger sisters so I don't go completely insane.
This is a great book for little girls who have sisters so that one may understand the other's point of view. It helps you take a great look at your own sibling relationships, or it will at least show you that your own younger sister is not NEARLY as bratty as Ramona. :)
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 19, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Even fifty years later there is no stop to the love of this book, and everyone who has read it can relate to it. In this, you might sympathize with Beezus over the trials and tribulations of little Ramona, act like a pest (as Grown-ups called her) like Ramona, and enjoy the ups and downs of having a little sister. When I was twelve, I was fortunate enough to fly across the country with my family just so we could see the "Ramona Setting" in Portland, Oregon. In tow with all the Beverly Cleary books (although in these days, there were not much) I had, I checked out all of the important points in the books. If you ever go to Portland, OR, take a look at Kickalat Street - it's great!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 17, 2003
Format: Paperback
This was one of my very first chapter books, given to me in the first grade, and it left such a lasting impression on me. I literally read it to pieces throughout my elementary school years, and even had two little dolls that I re-named Beezus and Ramona, who I used to act out many of the stories.
Each hilarious chapter about another mess Ramona causes for her big sister Beezus (my favorite was Ramona's first trip to the library, and her disastrous attempt to claim a beloved book for her very own) can stand on it's own. But connecting the different segments is a more complex running plotline about Beezus' horrible secret - sometimes she gets so mad at her little sister that she doesn't love her at all! Oh, the horror! :-)
After suffering through one embarrassing misadventure after another at the hands of her infuriating sister, Beezus finally confesses to her mother and her favorite aunt about the "wicked" thoughts she's had about Ramona. Expecting them to be shocked, she is stunned when both burst out laughing and begin reminiscing about their own childhood, when they had some not so loving moments themselves. Yes, even Mother and Aunt Beatrice, who are now the best of friends, experienced sibling rivalry. It's a tremendous relief to Beezus to learn that it's okay not to get along with Ramona all the time, and she realizes that along with the annoying times, she and her sister share plenty of affectionate moments as well.
Originally published in the 1950s, some things are obviously rather dated, but as a child of the 1970's I could completely relate to these two little girls. I am sure kids today can also, especially if they have younger sisters!
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