Braveheart and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

BRAVEHEART Mass Market Paperback – June 1, 1995

39 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$27.99 $0.01
Audio, Cassette, Abridged, Audiobook
"Please retry"

Best Books of the Year So Far
Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2015's Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
Available from these sellers.

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Amid the color, pageantry, and violence of thirteenth-century Scotland unfurls the resplendent tale of the legendary William Wallace, farmer by birth, rebel by fate, who banded together his valiant army of Scots to crush the cruel tyranny of the English Plantagenet king.

About the Author

Randall Wallace is the author of seven novels, including the New York Times bestseller Pearl Harbor. He has written four feature films -- We Were Soldiers, Pearl Harbor, The Man in the Iron Mask, and the 1995 Academy Award-winner Braveheart -- and produced and directed We Were Soldiers and The Man in the Iron Mask. For his work on Braveheart, he received the Writers Guild of America Award for Best Original Screenplay as well as numerous other accolades, including Academy Award and Golden Globe nominations.

In addition to his work as a filmmaker and author, Randall Wallace is the founder of Hollywood for Habitat for Humanity. This entertainment industry partnership with Habitat for Humanity works to garner financial donations, publicity, and volunteer involvement in support of Habitat for Humanity's goal of eliminating poverty housing worldwide. Wallace has two sons and lives in Los Angeles.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket; 1st Pocket Books edition (June 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671522817
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671522810
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 4.2 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #860,937 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Nelson R. Willis on November 7, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
As others have rightly pointed out, this novel does have its faults and weaknesses, but on the whole I found it entertaining. I normally read non-fiction, but I liked the movie so much that I felt that I had to read this book.
This would not be a particularly good book to rely on for a history lesson. Randal Wallace butchers history a bit in order to make a juicier plot. Though I would like to think that just as exiting a story could be told without sacrificing accuracy, I must admit that his technique works at times. For example, Randal Wallace portrays an affair between Scottish commander Sir William Wallace and French Princess Isabella that didn't and couldn't have happened. Randal Wallace also writes an epilogue which has an air of sober history, but where he's still running with his wildly revisionist story. He tells us that Edward II's reign was sad and brief. Sad, yes, but I wouldn't call a 20 year reign brief!
A blurb on the back cover makes the mistake of refering to Sir William as a highlander. Even Randal Wallace doesn't make this mistake himself.
There are also other little mistakes, such as giving the name "Stewart" to a character who is little more than a peasant. I'm no professor, but wasn't the name "Stewart" reserved for persons holding an important office in this period?
Despite these negative points, though, the book has it's strenghts. There is romance, drama, tragedy, humor, action, and there are interesting characters. Though I favored the movie over this book in many ways, the book does deliver some bits that the movie doesn't. There are two separate scenes in the book that appear as one combined scene in the movie, and actually that's to the movie's credit.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 23, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
It's finally happened . . . and I didn't think it possible. The movie was better than the book!

And while the story is a good one (and the only reason I gave this book a '5' rating . . . read on for further positive comments) . . . Mr. Wallace's prose style is rambling. His shift of viewpoints is confusing. And his references to modern phrasings and objects is bizarre, blasting the reader out of the storyline, and into reality.

An example: Fifty pages in . . . the setting is solidly 13th century Scotland, a festival is in progress, and the reader stumbles across
the following . . .

"Farmers were roasting a pig; women were comparing handiwork; young men were tossing a caber -- an unbranched tree trunk roughly half the size of a modern telephone pole -- in the traditional Highland games."

What?!

Slam! Bam! Back to 20th century America . . . and the telephone pole outside my house.

Should have stopped with ". . . an unbranched tree trunk," Mr. Wallace.

Leaves the reader scratching his head . . . a happenstance every writer worth his salt avoids like the plague.

Writers usually strive for one thing -- total reader immersion. And Mr. Wallace's writing reveals he, too, ascribes to this theory.

A better question may be -- where was the editor?!

On the good side, there was enough lyrical prose set solidly in the 13th century to keep me reading, which in itself is a coup of sorts. And, except for those jolts at odd intervals . . . it was, as they say on the dustjackets,

"A rollicking good tale!"
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Natali Lekka on June 15, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
A book about Scotsmen and their struggle to win their freedom forever ; a book about love, loyalty and devotion. Randall Wallace's Braveheart conjures up the scenes of a film we've all seen and loved. Only that it is much better. The writer pays his respects to his Scottish forefathers narrating the story of Sir William Wallace, the great Scottish national hero, through the eyes of a poet. His descriprions of this land of epic beauty carry us away to Medieval Scotland where we witness the leader's life as a boy, his secret wedding, the battles, his execution by the English.... 285 pages "haunted" by this 13th-century epic hi-story, written by a truly passionate writer. In the heart of Randall Wallace this is exactly how it happened... A true MUST-READ for every dedicated Scottish fan.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 27, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Although I enjoyed the film despite all it inaccuracies, (Ayrshiremen in Kilts, no Stirling Bridge etc etc ) I had hoped the book would have been more accurate, but no. Nothing more than a badly written book version of the script. So now all the plebs out there think Wallace was father of Edward the third... no way. (And I'm an Ayrshireman myself btw)
Anyone who wants a reasonable factional account try Tranters the Wallace. It has all the myths and legends, although even it tries too hard to paint bruce as a good guy rather than a landgrabbing Norman who cared little for the people of 'his' country of Scotland.
If you want the real truth try one of the many Factual books just out, but don't waste your time or money on this. Hire the video instead.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By "trombonebagpipegal" on June 12, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I'm a huge fan of the movie. I think it had excellent everything and wonderful music. But the book was awful-if I hadn't seen the movie and felt some devotion to it, I would have quit in the middle. The movie was quite inaccurate, but the action and storyline made up for that. But how can I comment on the book? I could say it was poorly written, or I could say that the plot was deviated with holes, or that William's eye color changes, and we never know what Murron is embroidering, or I could just say I wasted my time reading it. Unfortunatly for Randall Wallace, I rarely forget. Let's just say I won't be reading any of his books anytime soon. Don't waste your money-just watch the movie.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?