Programming Books C Java PHP Python Learn more Browse Programming Books
Qty:1
  • List Price: $29.99
  • Save: $11.07 (37%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 10 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Minimal highlighting. Minimal shelf wear. Tight spine.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

BUGS in Writing, Revised Edition: A Guide to Debugging Your Prose (2nd Edition) Paperback – February 19, 1998

ISBN-13: 078-5342379211 ISBN-10: 020137921X Edition: 2nd

Buy New
Price: $18.92
24 New from $10.35 36 Used from $2.51
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$18.92
$10.35 $2.51
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

BUGS in Writing, Revised Edition: A Guide to Debugging Your Prose (2nd Edition) + Writing for Computer Science + The Elements of Style, Fourth Edition
Price for all three: $52.20

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the new tech.book(store)
New! Introducing the tech.book(store), a hub for Software Developers and Architects, Networking Administrators, TPMs, and other technology professionals to find highly-rated and highly-relevant career resources. Shop books on programming and big data, or read this week's blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the tech industry. > Shop now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 704 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 2 edition (February 19, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 020137921X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0201379211
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 7.3 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #865,479 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Dupre's clear advice, presented with a sense of fun, may benefit anyone who writes. However, it is geared to technical and academic writers who usually understand their material but are not so skilled at passing along that understanding. Many of her examples show ways to use computer terminology wisely, but this is more, and better, than the much-touted Wired Style (LJ 10/1/96), offering not just definitions but broad advice. This would be a great supplementary text for any course in technical writing. For all academic collections.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From the Publisher

BUGS in Writing, may be the first book on writing that people read for sheer fun. Developed for anyone who writes and who works with computers, including computer and other scientists, students, professors, business people, programmers and technical writers. Rather than subjecting yourself to the pain and tedium of wading through a reference book on English grammar, pick up BUGS; you will soon find yourself browsing amusing and interesting material. While you are enjoying yourself, you will be tuning your ear: You will soon find that you are writing lucid prose that communicates your ideas. "If technical writing isn't your principal activity, but you find yourself doing a lot of it, you should read this book."- IEEE Micro "The Quality of scientific and technical writing would increase considerably if this book were required reading for all authors."- The Mathematica Journal "You can borrow my dictionary or steal my thesaurus. Just stay away from my copy of BUGS."- Patrick Henry Winston, MIT "This book will help me/you/we a lot/immensely."- Martin Griss, Laboratory Scientist, Hewlett Packard Laboratories

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

While I was checking my order I found style examples in the excerpt of the book which I strongly dislike and disagree.
Fernando Sotomayor
I expected something like a reference book for writing errors, however it is more like a novel you're supposed to read from the beginning to end.
Dorde
This book was very useful to me, as a non-native English speaker, when I started writing technical texts in graduate school.
Diego Zamboni

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

103 of 126 people found the following review helpful By Barbara Nostrand on January 10, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an annoying book. The author of this book claims that she wrote it for "computer people" whom she goes on to define as just about anyone who has visited the computer aisle in a bookstore. I was briefly employed as a technical writer while in graduate school and have found writing a constant part of technical employment in industry. I am currently a computer science professor who firmly believes that students need to learn how to write. Consequently, I incorporate writing into many of my courses. However, I can not recommend BUGS in Writing by Lyn Dupre.
Although the author cites the Manual of Style published by the University of Chicago Press, she failed to take to heart a number of its recommendations. In particular, her use of footnotes is excessive and often distracting. The overall design of the book appears very self-indulgent with its copious use of personal photographs unrelated to the text. The author is committed to "gender free" text to the point of altering the accepted names for famous computer science problems such as the Traveling Salesman Problem to suit her personal agenda and insists that others do likewise. She allows other petty issues to spoil her work. For example, she writes: "A dissertation is a document that you write as part of the fulfillment of requirements for a degree¡Ä A thesis is an assertion that you have presumably validated or proved ¡Ä" This is contrary to accepted practice at many and probably most academic institutions. While Martin Luther may have nailed his 95 thesis to a church door, some schools call even the paper presented for a doctorate a "thesis" while others reserve the term for a work presented for a master¡Çs degree. Current practice is to begin scholarly works with an "abstract" and not a "thesis".
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By John Paul Mueller on May 15, 2001
Format: Paperback
As a professional author with over 49 books to my credit, I've collected a number of guides to writing over the years. This book sits on my reference shelf right between Strunk and White, and the Chicago Manual of Style. I recommend it to other authors on a regular basis because it contains so many clear examples that are easy to read and understand. As far as I'm concerned, my reference shelf would be incomplete without this book.
There are two reasons that I like this book. First, it isn't dry and hard to understand. I like a little humor when I read. Second, the examples are clear and easy to follow. It's easy to write a book that defines writing in terms that only an English major would love. Writing a book like this is difficult, and I appreciate the author's hard work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on February 3, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a technical writer, I am on the lookout for books I can recommend to engineers and others with whom I work who want to improve their writing. This book's explicit orientation toward "computer people" and the concept of "debugging" prose make it seem like a good candidate. However, the author's self-indulgence in cuteness in this book renders it inappropriate for me to recommend in a professional context.
If you don't mind all the cat pictures and personal references, it is a good book to browse for tips on improving your writing. Dupre states that her goal is to help the reader develop an "ear" for good writing. As you develop an ear, you will gain a sense of which of her rules to take to heart, and which to take with a grain of salt. It is *not* organized or indexed such that you can easily find a topic again. Do not expect to use it as a reference book when you have finished browsing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on May 31, 2000
Format: Paperback
If this book had exercises for the reader, I'd have used it as a textbook for introductory technical writing classes. It's organized into big, rich chapters with lots of examples -- which is just the ticket for folks who are learning new skills.
For an experienced writer seeking advance on points of usage, I think there are more concise style guides -- but none funny enough to read for pure pleasure.
One caution: Dupre's prose style, while ornate, is clear and eminently readable, but writing like Dupre takes a great deal of skill and practice. A lot of the examples of "splendid" writing are compound-complex sentences with lots of flourish and flair. Such sentences may be dangerous models for total novices to follow.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
35 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Will Sprunk on September 17, 1998
Format: Paperback
This book is wonderful; this book rots. One thing for sure -- it's different!

HITS:

1) Informal, nonstuffy feel.

2) Covers a lot of material.

3) Has lots of examples.

4) Does a good job of showing the dynamic and subjective nature of English writing.

5) It is one of the very few style and grammar books that I've read that lends itself to being read like a book of short stories: sit on the john and make yourself a better writer. Now, THAT'S innovative.

MISSES:

1) MUCH physically bigger than it needs to be; thus, it is hard to use as a quick reference. The typeface is too big, but most importantly it is full of completely useless tangential photos. There are between 100 and 200 photos that, while cute, have no place it this book. Some reviewers seem to like this. I find it unprofessional. Would you enjoy paying extra money for a book to look at a stranger's family album? Think of the natural resources wasted on this silliness. If the author wants to write a picture book of her cats, that's fine, but she should market it to people whom get some benefit from it; I submit those people are an extreme minority in the readership of this book.

2) Does not use direct counter examples. So, instead of seeing an example bad sentence corrected, you see a different sentence done right. The author defends this as helping to develop "ear." I usually find it more annoying than helpful.

3) Does not cite sources of her opinions, and therefore it is very hard to take anything this book says as the final word. To be fair, she does warn that it is often just her opinion and not rock-solid fact. Differentiating them is the problem.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?