Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.95
  • Save: $3.76 (21%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Prime1
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: The cover shows normal wear and tear. The dust jacket shows normal wear. The pages show normal wear and tear. All shipping handled by Amazon. Prime eligible when you buy from us!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

BUMBLE-ARDY Hardcover – September 6, 2011


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$14.19
$3.77 $0.01
Paperback
"Please retry"

100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime


Frequently Bought Together

BUMBLE-ARDY + In the Night Kitchen (Caldecott Collection) + Nutshell Library: Alligators all around /  Chicken Soup With Rice / One was Johnny / Pierre
Price for all three: $39.92

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Top 20 Books for Kids
See the books our editors' chose as the Best Children's Books of 2014 So Far or see the lists by age: Baby-2 | Ages 3-5 | Ages 6-8 | Ages 9-12 | Nonfiction

Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool and up
  • Hardcover: 40 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; F First Edition edition (September 6, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062051989
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062051981
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 11.3 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #391,242 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A delight to read aloud" The Daily Telegraph Magazine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

Bumble-Ardy has evolved from an animated segment for Sesame Street that aired in the early 1970s to a glorious picture book about a mischievous pig who has reached the age of nine without ever having had a birthday party. But all that changes when Bumble throws a party for himself and invites all his friends, leading to a wild masquerade that quickly gets out of hand. In this highly anticipated picture book, Maurice Sendak once again explores the exuberance of young children and the unshakable love between parent (in this case, an aunt) and child. Bumble-Ardy is the first book illustrated and written by Sendak since Outside Over There in 1981.

More About the Author

For more than forty years, the books Maurice Sendak has written and illustrated have nurtured children and adults alike and have challenged established ideas about what children's literature is and should be. The New York Times has recognized that Sendak's work "has brought a new dimension to the American children's book and has helped to change how people visualize childhood." Parenting recently described Sendak as "indisputably, the most revolutionary force in children's books."
Winner of the 1964 Caldecott Medal for Where the Wild Things Are, in 1970 Sendak became the first American illustrator to receive the international Hans Christian Andersen Award, given in recognition of his entire body of work. In 1983, he received the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award from the American Library Association, also given for his entire body of work.
Beginning in 1952, with A Hole Is to Dig by Ruth Krauss, Sendak's illustrations have enhanced many texts by other writers, including the Little Bear books by Else Holmelund Minarik, children's books by Isaac Bashevis Singer and Randall Jarrell, and The Juniper Tree and Other Tales from Grimm. Dear Mili, Sendak's interpretation of a newly discovered tale by Wilhelm Grimm, was published to extraordinary acclaim in 1988.
In addition to Where the Wild Things Are (1963), Sendak has both written and illustrated
The Nutshell Library (1962), Higglety Pigglety Pop! (1967), In the Night Kitchen (1970), Outside Over There (1981), and, We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy (1993). He also illustrated Swine Lake (1999), authored by James Marshall, Brundibar (2003), by Tony Kushner, Bears (2005), by Ruth Krauss and, Mommy? (2006), his first pop-up book, with paper engineering by Matthew Reinhart and story by Arthur Yorinks.
Since 1980, Sendak has designed the sets and costumes for highly regarded productions of Mozart's The Magic Flute and Idomeneo, Janacek's The Cunning Little Vixen, Prokofiev's
The Love for Three Oranges, Tchaikovsky's The Nutcracker, and Hans Krása's Brundibár.
In 1997, Sendak received the National Medal of Arts from President Clinton. In 2003 he received the first Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award, an international prize for children's literature established by the Swedish government. Maurice Sendak was born in Brooklyn in 1928. He now lives in Connecticut.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

99 of 107 people found the following review helpful By Geoffrey Hayes on September 10, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Anyone who knows Sendak shouldn't expect his work to be "easy." It is defiantly idiosyncratic and often disturbing, unlike most of the garish pap out there these days. Sendak is less interested in telling a neatly tied-up story, than he is in creating an emotional narrative that invites repeated viewings. At 83, his art has lost none of its vibrancy, and he paints this one in loose and light watercolor spreads with thankfully no evidence of computer enhancement. The masks worn by the guests at Bumble Ardy's party are clearly bizarre, but intriguingly so. I suspect children will immerse themselves in Bumbe's environment despite what their parents might feel. And this is one of Sendak's strengths; he doesn't water down his work to please overly sensitive adults who have forgotten the wildness of their own childhoods. These days, awash as we are in political correctness, that takes balls! So celebrate this new work from a master of his craft and pray it won't be his last!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
31 of 34 people found the following review helpful By super_cami on September 22, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I was young enough to read Sendak's work as a child and am now old enough to share my love of his books with my niece. What I find absolutely enchanting about Sendak's work is that it continues to speak to you with an evolving voice as you get older. The fantastical situations and fun illustrations that most captivated me as a child have now evolved into a sort of reverence and reflection on childhood and growing up. Maybe I'm just reading a little too far into everything, but I just meant to make very explicit that Bumble-Ardy is very much a recapitulation of exactly that: my niece can enjoy the fanciful story and interesting illustrations, and I can enjoy the very philosophic aspects of it. I hadn't initially been very excited about the book until I heard an interview Sendak had on NPR, after which I decided I had to get the book. I'm glad I did. It's a fantastic addition to my personal library, a great story to read with my niece, and (assuming Sendak won't write another) a wonderful close to his career. I'm rather in love with it.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Paige G. on September 22, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
these reviewers are crazy. this book is hilarious. it never says they are drinking booze, to kids swill could be punch. the illustrations are amazing, as are all of sendaks books. i love at the end when the aunt and he make up. it is adorable. i read it to toddlers as well as my kindergarten twins.
i would recommend getting it, as i would recommend any other sendak book. there is nothing 'frightening' about it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Tim Mammel on October 2, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Adults are challenged and disturbed by Maurice Sendak's work, but kids aren't. Bumble-ardy is no exception. Sendak gives us an endearing tale of a pig wanting to party, getting into trouble, and promising "never to turn 10." Kids understand Sendak's exaggerated and absurd drama that echos from Grimm's Fairy Tales and traditional fables. Bumble-ardy is a character that takes full delight in life, and learns more about life when he makes mistakes. Through beautiful illustrations and cheeky writing, Maurice Sendak reminds us (in his charming and unassuming manner) to have fun, enjoy life, love our family, and practice forgiveness. And Sendak never skimps on humor and mischief to tell his story, things that kids thrive on and grown-ups can be up-tight about. Careful not to be too uptight, or you might miss the tenderness and compassion that gently emerge in this treasure the author has created.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Alexander TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 4, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a child psychologist, I work primarily with foster and adopted children. Because of this, these kids tend to deal with issues related to profound loss, abuse, abandonment, and people giving them the message they're not 'good enough.' I therefore had reservations about putting this book in my waiting room, given the general theme.

Turns out, the kids don't care. They love it! It's only been in my waiting room for a month or so, but I may have to buy another one soon, as it's getting lots of wear and tear.

And it's not just the kids reading it! Forget about subscribing to Newsweek for the adults who bring the kids; they want Bumble-ardy too!

Oh, and did I say (write) that the illustrations are incredible?

Anyhow, it's a great book for folks of all ages.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Wilson Trivino on October 13, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Growing up I have found memories of reading Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak. I even got to hear him speak during college and remember a cantankerous individual with a huge line that I regret not waiting in to get my book sign and tell him how much I enjoyed his work.
Now comes Bumble-Ardy, a lovable pig who lives with his aunt. He turns nine and no party to be had, so he has his own. It's cute to the point and the illustrations are lustrous and detailed to this piggy world.
Bumble-Ardy is a joy to read over and over with that special someone to spawn a new generation into the magic writing of Maurice Sendak.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Madigan McGillicuddy on October 3, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Poor orphaned Bumble-Ardy has never had a birthday party. In this rhyming story, Bumble-Ardy's Aunt Adeline takes him in. After receiving a cowboy costume as a gift, Bumble-Ardy decides to throw a party on his own while his aunt is out - a party that quickly gets out of control. As the costumed swine begin to "oink loud grunts" and pull "all kinds of dirty stunts", readers are treated to several nearly wordless pages of rampaging pigs, a là the wild rumpus of Where the Wild Things Are. The masks the pigs wear look scary, strange and like something out of Mardi Gras. There's something vaguely menacing about this story - I certainly felt uncomfortable with a few things. I didn't like the pig dressed as an Indian with a feathered headband. Bumble-Ardy is dressed as a cowboy, and many pages, including the cover, feature a pig dressed as a police officer. What's Sendak's message here?

As I read this new Sendak book, something tickled the back of my brain... the story, especially the repeating line of "half-past nine" just seemed so familiar. Was it something from Sesame Street? Yes! Yes it is.

I thought it was interesting that the boy from the original story becomes a pig in this version. Despite changing the wine that was guzzled to brine in this new offering, Bumble-Ardy is still sure to raise the hackles of concerned parents. The fact that Adeline is not his mother in this version, but rather his adoptive aunt, certainly raises the stakes, when Bumble-Ardy fears rejection. I think the emotional intensity of children is very well respected here. How many children feel put-upon when a birthday party isn't as grand as they hope?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?