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Babe Ruth and the 1918 Red Sox Paperback – December 26, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 438 pages
  • Publisher: iUniverse Star (December 26, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0595148263
  • ISBN-13: 978-0595148264
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #175,031 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

The 1918 season was momentous for the Red Sox. It was played under wartime restrictions; it saw their fifth World Series crown the last to date; and the Bambino began to change from ace pitcher to slugging outfielder. Wood, a Red Sox fan and sportswriter, backtracks to George Herman Ruth's youth as a rebellious urchin who was reoriented to his Hall of Fame career under a mentor at a Baltimore orphanage. Wood proceeds to provide an admiring story of the Red Sox triumph, despite depleted rosters and threats of a government shutdown and players' strike. Sure to attract Boston area libraries and most sports collections elsewhere. Morey Berger, St. Joseph's Hosp. Lib., Tucson, AZ
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

"A Red Sox tale with a happy ending ... give him a prominent spot on the vast Red Sox bookshelf." -- Boston Phoenix, June 7, 2001

"An entertaining and exhaustive account of a tumultuous season." -- Sports Illustrated, June 11, 2001

"Wood's original research lends urgency to what is sure to become a classic sports book." -- Seven Days, May 30, 2001

"[P]articular emphasis on [Babe] Ruth making the transition from pitcher to slugger and dominating headlines on and off the field." -- Boston Herald, April 6, 2001

Fresh research ... uncovers possible evidence that this World Series ... might have been influenced by gamblers. -- Baseball Weekly, March 21-27, 2001

One of the most important and least known years in baseball history. Wood has done remarkable, revelatory research... -- Robert W. Creamer, author of 'Babe: The Legend Comes to Life'

The possibility that the 1918 series was fixed is certain to inflame New Englanders. -- Publishers Weekly, March 19, 2001

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J. C. Aston on June 1, 2001
Format: Paperback
In 1918, Wood's main focus is on the dramatic and historic 1918 season, in which the Red Sox took their sixth Junior Circuit flag, then continued on to beat the Chicago Cubs in the World Series four games to one, becoming the first team to win five World's Championships. As we know, 1918 is also the last world title for the BoSox. Also featured are the amazing exploits of the young pitching phenom George Herman Ruth. This was the year that Ruth burst on the baseball world not as the Cy Young-like lefthander he had been, but as the soon-to-be Sultan of Swat most of us think of when we hear the name "Babe". Wood also goes into great detail on the undisciplined Ruth's season-long feuding with his manager, Ed Barrow, as well as with the Sox' owner Harry Frazee. Ruth was desparate to play first base, the outfield, or even come in as a left-handed shortstop so he could play every day and hit more homers. Management wanted him on the mound, where he was still one of the most dominant pitchers of the dead-ball era. Wood tells of at least three times where Ruth 'quit' the Red Sox, only to show up at the park the next day. Another major part of the book is told through the backdrop of World War I. In early 1918, Major League Baseball inexplicably failed to request an exemption from the government's "work or fight" order (while other entertainment industries, such as theater and the nascent motion picture crafts, were granted exemptions). This meant that players were obligated to either join the active military or find war-related work until the cessation of hostilities. With a September 15 deadline, baseball's answer was to cut the regular season short, with the last games being played on Labor Day and the World Series starting on September 5.Read more ›
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 21, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book tells you the whole story of the last year the Red Sox won the World Series. The star of the show is none other than Babe Ruth. The book is also a biography of Ruth's life up to that year - and he was an amazing character!
"1918" also gives you a picture of baseball during those times. I was amazed to learn that gambling on baseball was rampant, and the owners and players argued about money just like they do now.
This book is packed with fascinating information, and also really fun to read. If you're a baseball fan, a Red Sox fan or a fan of the Babe, you'll love it.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. M. McMahon on September 13, 2003
Format: Paperback
This is a well-written account of Babe's last championship season with Boston. If you are a Red Sox fan, it's a must read. If you know a Red Sox fan, this makes an excellent gift. 1918 is no longer a reminder of failure, but just another season when Boston won the world series.
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6 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Robografix on March 28, 2001
Format: Paperback
1918 is the year the Red Sox last won a World Series, and every opposing fan is pleased to remind them of that fact. Every baseball fan knows that Boston sold Babe Ruth to the Yankees and invoked the Curse of the Bambino. These facts have become part of the very fabric of the game.
Yet, amazingly, no-one has yet written an account of the momentous season, until now. The author, a Boston fan, has lovingly recreated that season, taking six years to research and write the book. The dedication to detail and historical truth shows in every line.
I feel it inevitable and ironic that, despite the wealth of detail and fact, this book will gain its reputation (or notoriety) because of the author's speculation that the 1918 Series may have been fixed, just like the 1919 White Sox series. Wood's impeccable research has brought to light some interesting facts (I won't spoil your reading of the book by going into them here) which, at the very least, draw a question mark over Boston's last World Series victory. It's certain to be the most controversial aspect of the book.
Aside from that, you'll find an affectionate portrait of the great Babe Ruth from his days as an ace pitcher, everything the most demanding fan could expect to know about the historic season, and a wealth of fascinating photographs, many of which haven't been published before. The photos themselves are worth the asking price for the book in my opinion.
Everyone with an interest in the history of the great game should have a copy of this book. Every Red Sox fan *needs* a copy. It might be the closest they ever come to savouring the taste of World Series victory :)
I can't resist ending this with a quote from the Boston Herald and Journal, September 13, 1918, which opens the book :
"Of course it is possible that some year will yet see a Boston team losing a world's championship."
Go Yankees :)
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