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Comment: Used in Worn Condition. No CD or Access Code. Ex-library books. Some Markings. Small tears and wear on corners and edges
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Babe: The Gallant Pig Paperback – July 18, 1995


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 6 - 9 years
  • Grade Level: 1 - 4
  • Lexile Measure: 1040L (What's this?)
  • Series: Babe
  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Yearling; Reprint edition (July 18, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679873937
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679873938
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.3 x 7.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #33,516 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Babe is a sensitive soul, deeply loyal to those who are kind to him. So when he is taken in by Farmer Hogget's sheepdog, Fly, it's only natural that he would want to follow in his foster mum's paw-steps. Even with Babe's considerable handicaps as a sheepdog--namely, that he's a pig--he manages to overcome all with his earnestly polite and soft-spoken ways, proving once again that might doesn't always make right. After saving the sheep from rustlers and wild dogs, Babe convinces Hogget that his idea of becoming a sheep-pig "b'aint so stupid" as it might look. But neither Hogget nor Babe, nor anyone else, could have predicted what follows.

As utterly charming as Charlotte's Web, this book is bound to pluck even the tightest heartstrings. Masterful characterization brings every personality to vibrant life, while Mary Rayner's lively line illustrations only elucidate images Dick King-Smith has already planted in the reader's mind. Herd the whole farmyard together: readers of all ages, ambitions, and antecedents will love this one. --Emilie Coulter --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

The fast-paced story of an extraordinary pig that wants to be a sheepherder. Ages 912.
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Dick King-Smith was a farmer for twenty years before becoming a writer, and most of his animal stories are based on his farming experiences. He won the Guardian Award with The Sheep-Pig, which became the blockbuster film Babe. Dick lives in Gloucestershire.

Customer Reviews

A delightful child's book... my grandson loves it!
Suzanne D.
It has something for everyone and is a deeply loving story.
E. R. Bird
This is the best animal book ever(except Charlotte's Web.)
Richard Bryant

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 38 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on January 21, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Like many of my generation, I came to "Babe" via the movies. I'm not proud of this fact. As a children's librarian I like to pretend that I've heard about all my children's books in their original papery forms. This is hardly the case, of course. Lots of book (like the wonderful "Millions" by Frank Cottrell Boyce) first come to my attention through their film. "Babe" is one of those books though that stands up well to a reading after viewing its adaptation to the silver screen. Dick King-Smith had enough guts and wherewithal to write a children's book about a pig despite the fact that the greatest pig adventure tale (i.e. "Charlotte's Web") was bound to draw comparisons. But did he care what die-hard White fans would say? Not he! He wrote a truly interesting, original, and deeply meaningful tale all on his own and devil take the consequences! Babe has the inherent sweetness of Wilbur and the pluck and charm of Walter R. Brooks', "Freddy". There's even a moral to the tale, but it's so sly and unassuming that kids will end up learning something despite themselves. Well done there.

Farmer Hogget is a man of few words. Running a small farm of sheep, the occasional goose, and a family of sheepdogs, Hogget has never owned a pig (despite his own swinish name). At a nearby fair he happens to correctly guess the weight of a small piglet up for grabs. The pig is happy to go with Hogget but is deeply lonely and the farmer's kind-hearted sheepdog Fly takes the piggy under her wing and raises him as she does her own puppies. It soon becomes clear that Babe, as the pig is called, has a fast mind and is quick to learn. He befriends an old sheep named Ma and learns that by speaking politely to ewes, like herself, he is able to herd them as effectively as any sheepdog.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on May 18, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Mr. Hogget, a sheep rancher, won a pig named Babe at the fair, very much like the one I went to in Sheridan, WY! When Babe came to the ranch, he was a very little pig, so Fly, the sheep dog, decided to mother him along with her five puppies. Babe was soon calling Fly, Mum. Babe also became friends Maaa, an old ewe who at the time needed to be taken care of separately. Maaa was always complaining on how sheepdog treated sheep. Babe asked, "Mum, will you train me to be a sheep-pig?" She said, "Yes." So, Fly started to train him how to be a sheep-pig on ducks, and soon he was fairly good. One day, when Maaa was back in the pasture with the flock and Fly and Farmer Hogget were at market, he decided to go meet the flock. It was chaos! There were sheep rustlers there! Babe ceased them from stealing all the sheep. From then, on Farmer Hogget let Babe come with him and Fly to check the sheep. The first time he came with them Farmer Hogget tried to get him to work the sheep. He did it perfectly! From then on he did most of the sheep work. One day, he decided to go visit the sheep. Again it was chaos! This time it wasn't rustlers, but worriers! They had Maaa down! Before they could kill her, Babe chased them away. Maaa died soon after. Farmer Hogget was readying babe for the sheep dog trials! Will he win? I recommend Babe the Gallant Pig, because it's very outstanding, exciting, and suspenseful!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
It's impossible to not compare Babe to Charlotte's Web because it is also about a pig that is trying to save its neck. Babe really holds up well against the classic work. Babe (which is very much like the movie that came from it) tells a marvelous story and also contains a lot of depth. The short book tells the story of a pig who decides to become a sheep-dog (or sheep-pig). King-Smith relates humorous, exciting, and touching episodes of the pig's life until the novel reaches a splendid climax at the National Sheep-Dog Trials. The novel does have quite a bit to say about life. It speaks to overcoming traditional boundaries as Babe becomes a sheep-pig. The novel speaks to how fellow beings should be treated. Perhaps most importantly, Babe: The Gallant Pig speaks ... as Babe learns to treat the "stupid" animals (this is what they were known as prior to Babe) like sheep and ducks with politeness and friendship. Babe: The Gallant pig has a lot to say (particularly to children) and tells a great story. It certainly ranks among the top works of children's literature.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Susan Zuckerman on December 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
Dick King-Smith has written a real gem! He is a genius at characterization. We are immediately caught up in the contrasting characters of the farmer and his wife. She talks a blue streak with never a pause for breath and turns and twists at great length in long and convoluted sentences that take up half the page, question after question and answering most of them herself. One susinct word suffices her husband.
The animal characters are even more rich! The loving mother sheep-dog takes poor little piglet Babe under her "wing". Loving and kind though she may be to Babe, she is completely rude and disdainful towards the "stupid" sheep. Babe learns the power of truly respectful kindness, and totally surpasses the dog in being able to manage the sheep herd and bring out the best in them.
As a teacher, I believe this has a message for us. I've seen some "benevolent dictators" in my day, who treat students as simpletons and get as much. Kindness, respect, and assuming intelligence go a lot further!
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