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The Babi Makers Paperback – January 14, 2013


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 142 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (January 14, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1481968254
  • ISBN-13: 978-1481968256
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 5.9 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,970,467 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

In more than three decades as a professional writer/journalist, Christopher has covered myriad subjects and interviewed thousands of people from the famous to the unknown. He brings his years of experience to each one of his novels. Every work is different. Through reading his novels, you can visit the American home front in the 1940s, a future San Francisco wiped out by a killer earthquake, a romantic love affair in post-war Paris in the 1920s, a future planet where the major industry is making babies -- or, coming in 2013, an exciting detective story set in 1930s Los Angeles. In his career, his work has appeared in daily newspapers, monthly magazines, extensively on radio and the occasional dalliance with television. He has written advertising copy and radio commercials -- and continues to write, write, write. Works featuring his byline include "The Babi Makers" -- a science fiction tale about a world where the most important resource is babies; "Sarah & Gerald" -- a novel about Paris in the 1920s; "Forever - and other stories" -- a collection of short stories; "The Life Line" -- the novel of the big one that levels San Francisco; "News on the Home Front" -- a novel of two friends during World War Two; and "Mama Cat" -- a book for children. Also, several short plays, a few radio plays and a boat load of radio documentaries.

More About the Author

In more than three decades as a professional writer/journalist, Christopher has covered myriad subjects and interviewed thousands of people from the famous to the unknown. He brings his years of experience to each one of his novels.

Every work is different. Through reading his novels, you can visit the American home front in the 1940s, a future San Francisco wiped out by a killer earthquake, a romantic love affair in post-war Paris in the 1920s, a future planet where the major industry is making babies -- or an exciting detective series set in 1930s Los Angeles.

In his career, his work has appeared in daily newspapers, monthly magazines, extensively on radio and the occasional dalliance with television. He has written advertising copy and radio commercials -- and continues to write.

Christopher is currently working on a series of novels that take place in 1930s Los Angeles called "The James Murray Mysteries." Books in the series are "Murder at Eastern Columbia," "Sabotage at RKO Studio" and the newest "Abduction at Griffith Observatory."

Other works featuring his byline include "The Babi Makers" -- a science fiction tale about a world where the most important resource is babies; "Sarah & Gerald" -- a novel about Paris in the 1920s; "Forever - and other stories" -- a collection of short stories; "The Life Line" -- the novel of the big one that levels San Francisco; "News on the Home Front" -- a novel of two friends during World War Two; and "Mama Cat" -- a book for children. Also, several short plays, a few radio plays and a boatload of radio documentaries.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By S. Deeth TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 29, 2013
Format: Paperback
The world of Nove may or may not be an imagined future earth, but some disaster has changed it from our present, and humanity lives in safely closed towns where well-ordered lives guarantee no crime and only the simplest of emotion. The writing's odd lack of sentimentality befits the story perfectly, inviting the reader into lives so simple and calm that we just know, there must be something wrong.

In a world where plants and animals have died, foods are constructed from proto-proteins in factories, but offer all the flavors and textures long lost. Unless you happen to be ridiculously rich, in which case maybe more is on offer, and a beautiful opening scene regales the reader with gastronomic splendors and surprise.

The topmost surprise is the sort of sting that leaves you wondering, surely not, and reading on to find out how this could be. Well-timed backstory provides the impetus as a teacher lectures his students. A rich leader pays the exorbitant fee to allow the birth and adoption of a child. The ordinary worker wonders why his female friend has fallen ill. A healer dies. And slowly the disparate characters of the tale come together while the edifice of perfect lives tumbles into denial.

Nove is a world where sexual pleasure is neither more nor less than its words, a kind hand offered, a drink, a hug, a coupling unburdened of regulation or effect, and desire turned into the "do no harm" pursuit of happiness. But harm, perhaps, is being done behind the scenes of this world. And The Babi Makers is an oddly disturbing and intriguing exploration of logic's illogical conclusions.

Not for the fainthearted, this is a novel that makes you think and leaves you thinking more. What would we sacrifice for love? And what for order, comfort, peace, and control?

Disclosure: The author gave me a free ecopy of this novel and asked for my honest review.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Did I enjoy this book: I'm not sure.

I was slightly nauseous the whole time I read. I'm still slightly nauseous. McPherson creates a seriously screwed up post-apocalyptic world in which people "farm" and eat babies, and I've been trying to channel my inner Jonathan Swift all week with little success. OM NOM NOM... babies?!

Readers know what's going on right from the beginning of the book. We know that most food-grade babies get ground up & turned into other food by machines that kind of remind me of evil Star Trek replicators. We know that fresh babi (because it isn't so bad if you spell it with an `i') is a delicacy. We know that the residents of this post-apocalyptic nightmare are "milked" and "harvested" on a regular basis, and that they honestly have no idea where babies come from (or why they should be appalled about their diet).

Enter the plotline: a teacher who hints that babies may have, at one time, come from humans instead of farms. A not-quite-the-same-as-everyone-else adult and his girlfriend, who just happens to have an odd growth in her abdomen that no one can identify. An over-genetically engineered "life-babi" who can control minds. A dark conspiracy, and, of course, sex. Lots of it. In McPherson's book, well, let's just say the Babi Makers greet each other in a most solicitous manner. I'm almost brave enough to call it reverse sexism, but at the very least, one of the (many) evil bad guys appears to be evil because he believes men should only sleep with women. In McPherson's world, relationship clusters contain as many members of each sex as the group is comfortable with, and monogamy is neigh unheard of.

It's a strange book.
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By pauline meharry on July 3, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Sci Fi fans would enjoy this short story. I read it in one afternoon and was intrigued by the premise of a future where babies are repurposed for a nutrition source. A little strange but fun to read.
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By Tanya Rushing on April 13, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really like the book. I love sci-fi but but sometimes find it difficult to read because it is so out there it is hard to picture what they are saying or describing. I was able to really understand and picture everything the author was saying and describing in this book. Ok, eating babies is a little weird but it was creative and I have never read anything like it before. I would love to read more sic-fi from this author. Overall I would absolutely recommend this book to everyone!
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By Priya D on March 13, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
This was probably the most absurd book I have read in a while. I'm still debating whether it was absurd in a good way.

I loved the cover of the book - how very science fiction-ey. It immediately grabbed my attention. You know how some say the first few pages of the book decide its fate - if it is slow, dull or too drastic, it probably wouldn't hold everyone's attention. I think The Babi Makers will have no problem keeping people involved right at the very start. The first eight pages are spent describing a lavish meal - with warm, brothy noodle soup and crispy, cool, delicious carrots (I don't even like carrot but these sounded amazing!) You start to really get into the whole thing and then out of nowhere, the people eat a 'babi'.

The summary provided by the author didn't warn me that the book was going to contain cannibalism. Here's why it's there. Once upon a time, some sort of meteor hit the earth and destroyed everything on it. The few people who survived The Fall ate whatever animals and plants were remaining. The ground was too damaged to produce any new plants. Soon the people began to eat each other, to keep from dying of starvation, until soon they discovered that they could make and eat babies. And we reach the present, in Nove, a planet where the making of babies is a major industry. To control population, only a few selected people are allowed to raise babies, called "Life Babies" and the rest are eaten. Babies aren't exactly given birth to either, but produced in factories and men and women are from a certain age onward "milked" for their genetic material.

The descriptions are gruesome, as I suppose they were intended, and painfully graphic. I can stomach the goriest of things, horror or otherwise, but this was an entirely new level of Yuck! for me.
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