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Babies Don't Eat Pizza: A Big Kids' Book About Baby Brothers and Baby Sisters Hardcover – January 22, 2009


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Dutton; 1st edition (January 22, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0525474412
  • ISBN-13: 978-0525474418
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 0.4 x 10.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #27,082 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

PreSchool-Grade 2—A straightforward, reassuring book aimed at children awaiting the arrival of a new baby in the family. Organized into logical sections—from babies' development in the womb to the hospital to what infants look like—the accessible text offers sound, comforting detail. A wonderful spread of "Your Basic Baby" points out everything from "wacky hair" to hospital bracelets. Several pages cover how infants fit into a family's life, explaining what they eat and do and how older siblings can interact with them. There are many self-affirming phrases like, "…you can be a big sister or big brother. That's important. Stand up, take a bow! Hooray for you!" The final page gives expectant parents tips on how to deal with potential sibling rivalry. The charming watercolor illustrations show all kinds of families caring for and getting to know their newcomers. Though many quality books on this subject are available, Danzig's offering will bring comfort to expectant parents and siblings alike.—Jane Marino, Bronxville Public Library, NY
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

While Danzig, an R.N. who has led sibling preparation classes for two decades, and Tilley \ (Growing Up: It's a Girl Thing) seek a spot on a very crowded bookshelf, their practical, straightforward approach merits a look. Focusing on day-to-day living with an infant, the text adopts an unfussy tone that subtly flatters readers as being sensible and mature (relatively speaking). "Babies are small and fragile and strong," writes Danzig. "Watch out for your ears and nose, and don't let your hair get too close." It's also notable that Danzig refers to the infant as "your baby," clearly signaling that the reader has a stake in all this, too. She reinforces the connection by referring readers frequently to their own babyhood: "Can you believe you had to learn to roll over?" Tilley's ink and watercolor cartoons are sunny and empathic in the Laura Cornell mode, and include plenty of visual jokes to encourage anxious kids-and their parents-to bond. Headings on most spreads make this volume eminently browsable-and therefore a handy family resource. --Publishers Weekly, Jan. 2009

Stop right here if you are looking for a perfect book to tell children about their new lit\ tle brother or sister. Done in a light-hearted but also matter-of-fact style, this book will answer all of the questions new big siblings have. The book ranges from what babies look like to what they eat to what they can do plus all of the hair pulling and stinky bottoms too. The mix of the sweet with the annoying will prepare children well.

Danzig's text is spot on, offering just the right amount of information and leaving nothing to a child's imagination. The tone is exactly right too, filled with humor but staying up front and informative. Tilley's illustrations add a friendly approachable feel to the information, keeping the book light rather than intimidating.

A great book for public libraries to have on hand to inform all of the new big brothers and sisters. This would also be a great gift for the new sibling when the pregnancy announcement is made. --Tasha Saecker, Children's Librarian, Director-Elisha D. Smith Public Library (Menasha, WI), Feb. 12, 2009

Becoming a big brother or sister is a very big deal in a child's life...try to think of a \ book that discusses infant development on a child friendly level...Well, thanks to Dianne Danzig, Babies Don't Eat Pizza fills in that gap nicely...This is a very sweet (but not saccharine-there's plenty of humor) and respectful book. Kudos to Danzig for noting that some mommies have an operation to get the baby out, and that some babies need to stay in an incubator if they are small or sick. The book empowers children in interaction with their new brother or sister...If you know of a soon-to-be big brother or big sister, get him/her this book. --Jennifer Schultz, Youth Services Librarian, Warrenton Branch of the Fauquier County Public Library System (VA), Feb. 27, 2009

Featured as "Parents' Press Pick": ...What do babies do? They sleep, they nurse, they have wacky hair - and so did you, Dianne Danzig explains in this charming, kid-friendly book for ages 3-8. Our resident sibling (Celia, age 3, big sister to Reuben, age 6 months) gave it two thumbs up. So do we. Practical tips for parents too. --Dixie Jordan, Editor/Publisher, Parents' Press (San Francisco Bay Area, CA), March 2009

More About the Author

As the oldest of five children, a mother of two and a nurse educator for over 3,000 children in Big Brother-Big Sister classes, author Dianne Danzig knows what it's like when babies join families. Quoted in Parents Magazine on how to prepare siblings for a new baby, Dianne, an RN, has cared for well babies, infants in intensive care and older children.

With Babies Don't Eat Pizza, Dianne uses sensitivity and kid-friendly humor to fill the need for a multiracial book that honestly answers 4-8 year olds' real questions, perceptions and concerns about babies. "How do babies grow inside?" "What do they do?" "What can I do?" "How do I feel about this?" "What about me?"

The book was also designed to include oft-missed sibling preparation topics such as breast and bottle feeding, adoption, twins and infants with special needs.

On another project, volunteering for a fundraiser to benefit San Francisco children, Dianne helped write the bestseller, "The City by the Bay - A Magical Journey Around San Francisco" (Chronicle Books). She lives with her family in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Customer Reviews

My grandson loves the book and my son and daughter in law enjoyed reading it to him over and over.
curious
I thought it was a nice bonus that the book included tidbits on adoption, c-sections, multiples and preemies- also presented in a very age appropriate way.
Julie
We are very happy with this book and how it has helped the children in our house prepare for the new baby, who will be here any day!
ErmarCar

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Sarah E. Roy on December 2, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is described as a reading level for ages 4-8 . . . and I think that's a bit of a stretch. Yes, I've known some 'advanced' four year olds that might have understood this book, but the amount of the text alone is daunting. I got this for my cousin and her husband, who have a 4 year old (Braden), and are pregnant with their second, and there is no way Braden would have sat through this book. I didn't even read all the writing, I started skimming . . . it's overwhelming. And I read, a lot, and I also enjoy childrens books, but this one . . . I just couldn't get into it.

I wanted a book to help introduce him to the idea of another baby, and this is a little TOO factual. Yes, the information provided is very good, and as an adopted child I'm pleased to see adoption mentioned (however briefly) but to be honest, what 4 year old needs to know that the baby's eyes may change color and you won't know what they'll be till their first birthday, or need to see pictures of the baby in the uterus (what 4 year old even needs to know what a uterus is?). I did like that they said the baby came out of the mom, I don't like books insinuating a stork or something else brought a baby, it comes out of a person and there's no reason for that to be taboo, but I thought the line about C sections was a bit much. "They're pushed out - through an opening between moms' legs, or lifted out - through a cut made in moms tummies by their doctors. (Those moms have surgery and get a special medicine so it won't hurt.)" Even though they add that it wont hurt . . . it's a 4 year old. Telling them someone might be cutting open their moms tummy . . . Braden almost started crying when I jokingly said he was so cute I wanted to eat him (some kids think that is really funny, he, did not).
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Nancy Branagh on June 16, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was blown away by Babies Don't Eat Pizza! Like all good books, it has the potential to affirm, educate, and challenge. It is an entertaining, honest, and loving tool for adults to prepare children for the daunting arrival of a new baby. It can be read straight through as a picture book or presented in small pieces to foster important discussions. Children have different abilities and interest levels and a book like this allows adults to use their discretion in adapting its content to a child's needs. Younger children might respond most to the beautiful illustrations. Older children can participate in more complex discussions. Each experience is extremely valuable. As a preschool teacher who has worked with children for over 30 years, I am thrilled to find this book and would give it my highest recommendation!
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Karen J. Scott on December 12, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My 3 year old granddaughter was awaiting the arrival of her new baby sister. This book explained in a most sensitive manner the bump in mom's tummy, helping with the new baby, not ever being rough, even cuddling with mom while she nursed. And only the big kids get the privilege of eating pizza! We are reading this book -- over and over again. :o)
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By mom2threebabes on January 21, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I looked high and low for a special book for my 7 year old. They all seemed too babyish for him. This book is a PERFECT fit for a kid age 5-8. It has enough words and detail to really have a discussion about things dealing with the new baby! Just to let you know, it DOES show a lady breastfeeding and says the word breast. And it also talks about the baby coming out either through a cut in the tummy or pushed out through and opening between moms legs. We are fine with the terms and pictures. My husband and I think they are very age appropriate, but some might not so I thought I would mention this. The ending is very reassuring to a child, reminding them they were once small and how they have grown and how the parents will always love them even when they are busy with a new baby! LOVE this book! It was exactly what I was looking for! Brought a tear to my eye :)
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Kansas Reader on May 11, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I was so pleased to see that adoption is included as just one other way to add a new baby to a family. Ms. Danzig has such a comfortable, factual way of treating all the events -- pregnancy, birth, coming home and then continues on with baby's development. I love the way she blends the excitement of a new baby with the inevitable downside, and does it with an overriding message of unconditional love and understanding. What a great way to demonstrate the best of parenting and being a big brother or sister! Charming and a must-have.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Natalie M. Z. Kelsey on June 9, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Perfectly age-appropriate for new older brothers and sisters 4-10. Entertaining and informative, nothing objectionable, clear and concise. Great tips for parents at the end. Even though we're having our baby biologically, I appreciated that the book talked about if you were picking up your adopted baby, too.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Kristine Gibbs on August 6, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My daughter is two and thinks this book is fabulous. She has been working on memorizing it because she really likes, "Do this, don't do that" rules. The bits about what kinds of toys are good and bad for babies is her favorite part. She is starting to ask if other babies we see in public are crying because they are hungry or because they are tired, so I feel the book is excellent at communicating information.

I also appreciate the detail and specifics. I'm not interested in books that are going to talk down to my kid and assume she's an idiot just because she is young. This book completely avoided that problem.
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