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Baby with the Bathwater Paperback – January 1, 1984


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Dramatists Play Service (1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0822200848
  • ISBN-13: 978-0822200840
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 7.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #538,415 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Paperback
Famous for his dark, absurdist comedies, Christopher Durang focuses on parenthood and early childhood here, creating a strange play in which John and Helen, new parents who have no clue about their own lives, try to cope with parenthood and its unfamiliar and unpleasant demands. Bringing home the baby, they argue about the father's reference to the baby as a "baked potato," the mother's demand for a divorce (her husband has blond hair and "I like men with dark hair"), the fact that they know nothing about toilet training and can't afford to hire someone to train the child, and a host other non-issues.

Suddenly Nanny arrives, unbidden, with her own set of demands and a device to get the baby to stop crying--a box from which a spring-loaded snake pops out, scaring it into silence. Further complications develop when a strange young girl arrives and decides to take the baby to Florida because her dog ate her own baby.

The first act, originally a one-act play, feels like one, with little development and farce-like, frantic activity which bears no resemblance to real life. The second act takes "baby" to adulthood, offering complications and glimpses of reality which make the play far more potent and more dramatic. "Baby," a four-year-old boy now called Daisy and dressed as a girl, enjoys challenging buses, which somehow always manage to stop in time. Helen, the mother, is trying to become a writer, having had success as the author of the Cliff's Notes for the books Princess Daisy and Scruples. John, the father, is unemployed and often crouches beside the refrigerator.

As Daisy grows, he has trouble in school and college, where he cannot finish a paper on Jonathan Swift for many years.
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Format: Paperback
Famous for his dark, absurdist comedies, Christopher Durang focuses on parenthood and early childhood here, creating a strange play in which John and Helen, new parents who have no clue about their own lives, try to cope with parenthood and its unfamiliar and unpleasant demands. Bringing home the baby, they argue about the father's reference to the baby as a "baked potato," the mother's demand for a divorce (her husband has blond hair and "I like men with dark hair"), the fact that they know nothing about toilet training and can't afford to hire someone to train the child, and a host other non-issues.

Suddenly Nanny arrives, unbidden, with her own set of demands and a device to get the baby to stop crying--a box from which a spring-loaded snake pops out, scaring it into silence. Further complications develop when a strange young girl arrives and decides to take the baby to Florida because her dog ate her own baby.

The first act, originally a one-act play, feels like one, with little development and farce-like, frantic activity which bears no resemblance to real life. The second act takes "baby" to adulthood, offering complications and glimpses of reality which make the play far more potent and more dramatic. "Baby," a four-year-old boy now called Daisy and dressed as a girl, enjoys challenging buses, which somehow always manage to stop in time. Helen, the mother, is trying to become a writer, having had success as the author of the Cliff's Notes for the books Princess Daisy and Scruples. John, the father, is unemployed and often crouches beside the refrigerator.

As Daisy grows, he has trouble in school and college, where he cannot finish a paper on Jonathan Swift for many years.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

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