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Back to Tracks Import


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Audio CD, Import, December 15, 2007
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Editorial Reviews

CD ALBUM

1. Back to the Tracks
2. Street Singer
3. The Blues and I
4. For Heaven's Sake
5. The Ruby and the Pearl

Product Details

  • Audio CD (December 15, 2007)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Toshiba EMI Japan
  • ASIN: B000PGTEAG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #831,814 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By political idiot on January 5, 2000
Format: Audio CD
This is a great session from 1960. Tina Brooks is a severly overlooked tenor sax player from the Blue Note stable. This session highlights his wonderful talents especially on the first three self penned compositions. He is backed by nothing but the best: Blue Mitchell(tpt), Jackie McLean(asax 1 cut only), Kenny Drew(p), Paul Chambers(b), Art Taylor(d). Highlights include a killer title track, a medium tempo deep groove in "Street Singer", the hard swingin' "The Blues And I" and the beautiful "For Heaven's Sake." Highly recommended pure hard bop.
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Tom Schusterbauer on December 12, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Oh my. What a stable Blue Note had all those years ago. So many classics, so many players drifting in and out of each other's music. Turretine working for Grant Green who worked for Turrentine. Art Farmer and young Jackie McLean doubling up for classics such as Sonny Clark's Cool Struttin', and then Jackie showing up with Blue Mitchell for another classic, this one--Tina Brooks' Back to the Tracks.
What happened? Why did Blue Note hold on to this for decades?
Tina could write--his tunes swing with an overlay of blues, even an echo of gospel. McLean is loose on alto, although not as scorching as he gets in later years. Blue Mitchell goes strong on the trumpet, and Tina is in nobody's shadow as he works the tenor sax. Paul Chambers and Art Taylor lay down an insistent melody line, and everone else takes off from there, but noone goes so far away that the rhythm breaks down or the hooks fall apart.
Three of the five pieces belong to Tina, and his melodies swing in that hard bop way. And those eight to ten minute tracks let everyone stretch out, work together, branch out on their own.
Tragedy in Tina's life? Sure, but that's old news for jazz artists in the forties and fifties. Musically, Tina Brooks deserved a better fate. This is a classic, right up there with Morgan's "Sidewinder," Clark's "Cool Struttin,'" and Dexter Gordon's "Go."
Better late than never, sure, but not for Tina Brooks.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 4, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Tina Brooks' music is enjoying more poularity today, thanks to Blue Note's massive reissue catalog, then it did during his life time. Part of this is due to the fact that hardly any of the material from sessions he lead was released domestically during his lifetime, another reason was his short period of activity. He faded from the music scene in the early sixties, spiraling into addiction only to die from kidney failure in 1974 at 42. As a tenor Tina's tone is something like Hank Mobley's, possibly brighter and a touch more brittle. He tracks through three originals and two standards backed by Blue Mitchell (another underrated musician) on trumpet, Kenny Drew on piano, Paul Chambers on bass, Art Taylor on drums, and on "Street Singer" altoist Jackie McLean. The performances are all swinging straight ahead hard bop in the classic Blue Note tradition, with Brooks displaying a tender ballad touch on "For Heaven's Sake". This is a perfect introduction to the lost talent of another fallen jazz hero, and worth the investment.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Anders Jonasson on July 24, 2001
Format: Audio CD
It feel sad when I listen to this recording.... such a talent like Tina Brooks and never any real recognition during his short life time. I came across his name on the legendary Jimmy Smith recording "The Sermon" I had never heard of him before that, but I was struck by his wonderful playing on that record. So now after some years I finally got my act together and purchased this CD. Tina Brooks plays with a tremendous blues feel,and his lines are very well constructed.... and he swings ... he has that kind of "metal sound" that comes from the Coltrane school, but he plays "smoother" and rounder" and more linear than for example Hank Mobley... that is probably the reason why I personally like Brooks better. What else??? Blue Mitchells playing is just wonderful, slightly more complex than on later recordings. his lines are of course quite simple but very effective and clear .... I am also in favour of Art Taylor, he is very light and bouncing and adds a lot to the overall groove. Paul Chmabers does swing hard.. altough I would like to hear his basslines more clearly defined, I do not know if this has anything to do with the original recording itself ??? My favourite track is the minor blues "The Blues and I" All in all a very nice Blue Note Hard Bop recording from the 60:s.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Wayne Dawson on September 16, 2008
Format: Audio CD
Back to the Tracks is part of the Brooks canon of Open Sesame and True Blue that shows this remarkable artist at his resilient best.

The title track kicks off with a short, clipped phrase that swings tremendously; trumpeter Blue Mitchell's pithy sound combining beautifully with Brooks lean and tensile lines. Personally, even more so than the Horace Silver sessions, I find this one the best for showcasing the sound and style of Mitchell's playing. With longer tracks and more solo space to fill, Mitchell proves just how solid he can be when stretching out.

On Street Singer, Jackie MacLean joins tenor and trumpet on alto sax and Brooks shows with this composition how simplicity can produce great beauty and strength.

The Ruby and the Pearl is another gem from the Brooks pen that has a fabulous exotic harmony to the head; Mitchell and Brooks nail it to the mast in a gorgeous fade out that concludes a knock out disk supported all the way by a rhythm section tight and driving.

Back to the Tracks adds further weight to the accolades of the Tina Brooks legacy. His compositional brilliance and lean, melodic style of playing, often punctuated by parched, bluesy wails, inspired many of his peers.

His was an unimpeachable talent that ended in sadness and anonymity.
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