Bag It 2011 NR CC

Amazon Instant Video

(67) IMDb 7.3/10
Available in HD

What starts as a film about plastic bags evolves into a extensive investigation into plastic and its effect on our waterways, oceans and even our bodies.

Starring:
Ray Anderson, Noam Chomsky
Runtime:
1 hour 19 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Bag It

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Documentary, Comedy
Director Suzan Beraza
Starring Ray Anderson, Noam Chomsky
Supporting actors Martin Bourque, Michael Braungart, David Chameides, Theo Colborn, Richard Conlin, Peter Coyote, Linden Dahlkemper, Sylvia Earle, Marcus Eriksen, Eric Goldstein, Elizabeth Griffin, Scott Harrison, Dan Imhoff, Chris Jordan, John Klavitter, Annie Leonard, Brady Montz, Charles Moore
Studio Docurama
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 3-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
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See all 67 customer reviews
The movie is well done and entertaining.
Alice514
I recommend it to anyone interested in learning about how plastics can potentially be harmful to living organisms and the environment.
Dolores Baker
This is a very real concern as well and one that needs to be explained and explored in depth.
K. Harris

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
There is no denying that there is a good message and a big heart behind the documentary "Bag It." At a mere 79 minutes, the film raises a lot of points about the dangers of plastics from a number of different angles (pollution, resource management, questionable chemical additives). By no means is "Bag It" the first or the last film that will cover this familiar terrain. But while I am very familiar with all of the arguments that the film raises, the movie offers a unique and appealing everyman guide in narrator Jeb Berrier. One of my common complaints in environmental documentaries is that they can tend to lack focus. With so much wrong in the world today, they can bludgeon the viewer with doom and gloom (and instead of inspiring me to act, they sometimes make me feel defeated by the futility of it all). So I was pleasantly surprised for most of "Bag It" as Berrier (and filmmaker Suzan Beraza) delineated their focus so specifically. As a practical and comprehensive argument against single use plastic containers (such as the ubiquitous grocery bag), it may well be the best documentary of its kind that I've seen (and I've seen a lot)!

Beraza's piece won me over completely as Berrier starts his quest to discover the harms caused by something as innocuous as a simple grocery bag. The film succeeds in establishing the ecological harms of single use plastic. The affects of this limitless waste is well supported and the trauma caused to our oceans and wildlife is particularly haunting. It makes a compelling case that the use of money and resources to create this product serves no particular purpose and is a real (but silent) drain on the economy. It offers some alternatives for personal use, as well as some larger examples of communities that have taken action.
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Format: Amazon Instant Video
There is no denying that there is a good message and a big heart behind the documentary "Bag It." At a mere 79 minutes, the film raises a lot of points about the dangers of plastics from a number of different angles (pollution, resource management, questionable chemical additives). By no means is "Bag It" the first or the last film that will cover this familiar terrain. But while I am very familiar with all of the arguments that the film raises, the movie offers a unique and appealing everyman guide in narrator Jeb Berrier. One of my common complaints in environmental documentaries is that they can tend to lack focus. With so much wrong in the world today, they can bludgeon the viewer with doom and gloom (and instead of inspiring me to act, they sometimes make me feel defeated by the futility of it all). So I was pleasantly surprised for most of "Bag It" as Berrier (and filmmaker Suzan Beraza) delineated their focus so specifically. As a practical and comprehensive argument against single use plastic containers (such as the ubiquitous grocery bag), it may well be the best documentary of its kind that I've seen (and I've seen a lot)!

Beraza's piece won me over completely as Berrier starts his quest to discover the harms caused by something as innocuous as a simple grocery bag. The film succeeds in establishing the ecological harms of single use plastic. The affects of this limitless waste is well supported and the trauma caused to our oceans and wildlife is particularly haunting. It makes a compelling case that the use of money and resources to create this product serves no particular purpose and is a real (but silent) drain on the economy. It offers some alternatives for personal use, as well as some larger examples of communities that have taken action.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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Format: DVD
I see that there are already 18 other reviews of this 78-minute film from 2010 posted so I'll try not to rehash the info already provided. This documentary starts out discussing the "plastic bag" and its impact on the environment but also covers plastics in general (packaging, baby bottles and toys, plastic lined cans, etc) and the need to recycle. The "host" is Jeb Berrier, a guy who looks and acts like Michael Moore. At first it looks like HE is the person who created the film as Director and writer, but you will see in the credits that the Director is Suzan Beraza and the writer is Michelle Curry Wright. (Neither is shown). So, honestly, I don't know if Berrier is telling his own story or if this is a "plot device" to present this important issue. But it works. And, later in the film Berrier turns from his Michael Moore mode to his Morgan Spurlock ("Super Size Me") mode to try to eat as many foods containing Phalytes (sp?) as he can.

The interviews are with both environmentalists and authors of books on recycling. And the Director cleverly inserts scenes from TV shows and old movies. The soundtrack is great too. (I wonder if there is a soundtrack album, but I don't think so.)

The bonuses don't add a lot (and the six "bonuses" don't amount to much more than 10 minutes total). And, as you'd expect, the DVD is packaged in a recyclable foam cardboard package. This is good idea but, oddly, that package is enclosed in an additional slipcase (totally unnecessary), which will add to more trash. Go figure!

I hope you found this review both informative and helpful.

Steve Ramm
"Anything Phonographic"
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