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Ballparks Then and Now (Then & Now Thunder Bay) Hardcover – June 10, 2002


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Product Details

  • Series: Then & Now Thunder Bay
  • Hardcover: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Thunder Bay Press; (3rd) edition (June 10, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1571455930
  • ISBN-13: 978-1571455932
  • Product Dimensions: 11.6 x 0.7 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #946,070 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Eric Enders is a baseball historian and freelance writer whose work has appeared in the New York Times and other publications. The first ballpark he fell in love with was Dudley Field, where he attended minor league games as a child in El Paso, Texas. A lifelong Dodger fan, he has been to twenty-nine of the ballparks featured in this book. He is a former researcher at the National Baseball Hall of Fame Library and is also the author of the Play Ball! Baseball Scorebook. He lives in Cooperstown, New York, where he runs Triple E Productions, a baseball research and consulting service.

More About the Author

Eric Enders is a freelance writer, baseball historian, and former researcher at the Baseball Hall of Fame Library in Cooperstown, New York. His work has appeared in the New York Times, the Village Voice, Variety, MLB's World Series program, Yankees Magazine, and many other publications. He has also been a reporter for the El Paso Herald-Post and a freelance editor and proofreader for numerous publishers including Barnes & Noble and National Geographic.

A native of El Paso, TX, and a lifelong Dodger fan, Eric operates Triple E Productions, a baseball research and editing company.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By James Benson on December 20, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Earlier I had the opportunity to read Josh Leventhal's book Take Me Out to the Ballpark. Leventhal's passion for the game was evident in his well constructed book. Ballparks Then and Now had about half the content and sounded like it was being told by person who was totally bored by baseball.
Take Me Out to the Ballpark actually described the stadiums (outfield distance, peculiarities, history, fence hight, home runs hit, milestones, interesting anecdotes, etc.). Whereas, Ballparks Then and Now came across like an eighth grade report on baseball. "And then the Yankees played at the polo grounds and then they built their own stadium and then the Mets built their own stadium and then the Dodgers moved to Calfornia ..."
What was most bizarre about this book was that the text rarely lined up with the photos. The text would talk about New York baseball in 1900 and the picture is of Yankee Stadium. Later we see pictures of the first baseball games in New York ... while we read text about ... Yankee Stadium!
Do yourself a favor and get Take Me Out to the Ballpark instead.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Rob Pendell on December 13, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I have enjoyed several of Mr. Enders' published articles, particularly his list of the 25 greatest works of baseball art in the 2001 All Star Game program (headed by "Who's On First" and including Lou Gehrig's farewell address and the baseball box score, which he further celebrates in his "Play Ball! Baseball Scorebook"). Enders' sense of art and engrossing writing style play together brilliantly in this celebration of ballparks. The photos are excellent, the commentary profound, and what really intrigues me are the fact boxes he creates for each stadium. These include stadium aliases, opening dates, home teams and stadium capacity, and finish with a "Greatest Moment" from the history of each stadium. Truly, Enders has opened himself to swift rebuke in some instances (can Kirk Gibson REALLY own the greatest moments in two historic ballparks?), but some of his chosen moments are insightful. One of my favorites is the story of a fire that broke out at West Side Grounds in Chicago, during which two players beat down a fence to allow fans safe passage to the field. Enders also reminds us, in word and photo, that several Major League parks hosted Negro League teams as well, and his "Extra Innings" has some nice nods to non-Major League fields of interest. All around, well done.
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21 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Travis Rogers on April 28, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Having purchased nearly every ballpark book in existence, I have to say that this one falls short of the mark. The author, evidently a Dodger fan, (pages and pages on Dodger Stadium and Ebbets field) gives scant information on many of the parks with some really poor pictures, when pictures are provided at all. For example, the author never shows an interior picture of the new Miller Park. There are much better books dealing with ballparks - skip this one, its not worth the money.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Rob Pendell on December 13, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I have enjoyed several of Mr. Enders' published articles, particularly his list of the 25 greatest works of baseball art in the 2001 All Star Game program (headed by "Who's On First" and including Lou Gehrig's farewell address and the baseball box score, which he further celebrates in his "Play Ball! Baseball Scorebook"). Enders' sense of art and engrossing writing style play together brilliantly in this celebration of ballparks. The photos are excellent, the commentary profound, and what really intrigues me are the fact boxes he creates for each stadium. These include stadium aliases, opening dates, home teams and stadium capacity, and finish with a "Greatest Moment" from the history of each stadium. Truly, Enders has opened himself to swift rebuke in some instances (can Kirk Gibson REALLY own the greatest moments in two historic ballparks?), but some of his chosen moments are insightful. One of my favorites is the story of a fire that broke out at West Side Grounds in Chicago, during which two players beat down a fence to allow fans safe passage to the field. Enders also reminds us, in word and photo, that several Major League parks hosted Negro League teams as well, and his "Extra Innings" has some nice nods to non-Major League fields of interest. All around, well done.
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Format: Hardcover
When it comes to compendiums of Major League Baseball stadiums, there are many choices out their. This one is thoroughly average.

The information in this book is about as dry as it gets. Even a baseball history nut like myself got worn out by the dull, droll writing after about 15 pages and resorted to just leafing through and looking at the pictures.

Luckily, though, the pictures in this book are interesting and provide some nice snapshots of the rich history of MLB stadiums through the years.

Thus, while better options for this sort of fare most surely exist, this one isn't terrible. If you skip the text entirely and leave it on your coffee table for guests to page through and skim the pics, it's serviceable.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I actually did read about several of the ball parks before I gave this book to my brother-in-law!! He loved getting it and actually started reading before we left our Christmas gathering.
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