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Bambi vs. Godzilla: On the Nature, Purpose, and Practice of the Movie Business (Vintage) Paperback – February 12, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-1400034444 ISBN-10: 1400034442

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Product Details

  • Series: Vintage
  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage (February 12, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1400034442
  • ISBN-13: 978-1400034444
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 5.2 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #325,627 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Mamet's a veteran screenwriter and director (currently producing The Unit for CBS), but that doesn't mean he has any great love for the industry—his Hollywood is the stereotypically corrupt and cutthroat world where screenwriters willingly change their stories to accommodate every stupid suggestion from producers, who are blatantly lining their own pockets, while stars bicker over who has the bigger trailer. But his stories are entertaining even when they're unsurprising, and though loosely organized, a few broad themes emerge. He expounds at length, for example, upon his well-known penchant for straightforward storytelling, where drama boils down to "the creation and deferment of hope," and every scene should be able to answer three questions: "Who wants what from whom? What happens if they don't get it? Why now?" At other times, he's happy simply to explain why he thinks Laurence Olivier was a terrible film actor or to test out a theory that the early film industry owes its development to Eastern European Jews with Asperger's syndrome. As usual with Mamet, each word is precisely chosen for maximum effect, and nearly all hit their mark. (Feb.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

By anyone's measure, Mamet is a prodigious writer, somehow finding time for the occasional essay amid his ever-expanding repertoire of plays, screenplays, and novels. His latest essay collection focuses on the movie industry, and his stance is that of someone who has seen Hollywood's facelift scars and whose advice to eager novices just off the bus can be summarized thusly: "Go back." This might appear self-serving, for a man who has found success in a cutthroat industry may want to discourage potential competition. But Mamet's cynicism comes off as genuinely hard-won. He outlines the Hollywood caste system with a precision that reflects the bitter experience of the person at the bottom--the screenwriter. Scorn, betrayal, and subjugation--this is the lot of the writer, who, according to Mamet, is resented by nearly everyone in the business. Miraculously, though, great drama is occasionally realized on the screen, and Mamet offers writers some guidelines on how to approach it. However, be warned that those seeking a screenwriting method will be greatly disappointed--but, then again, that is perhaps ideal training for the job. Jerry Eberle
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

If you are a movie buff at all, read this book.
Sarah
This is a wonderful book, a series of readable, erudite, witty, practical and very wise essays on film - a subject few write on well.
Duncan Bush
I didn't realize until reading this book that he doesn't have a clue what truth is.
Richard Taylor

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

43 of 50 people found the following review helpful By C. Hutton on February 24, 2007
Format: Hardcover
David Mamet is a playwright who won the Pulitzer Prize for "Glengarry Glen Ross" and an Oscar nominated screenwriter for "The Verdict" and "Wag The Dog." It is no wonder that, as a wordsmith, "Bambi vs. Godzilla" is a delight to read. This book is a series of opinated essays by a Hollywood insider who attacks the industry for favoring profits over art. There are times that the author overwrites a simple thought into a complex paragraph that leaves one shaking their head. It is still an entertaining read.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By B. Hayes on July 24, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I love David Mamet's plays. He's an excellent writer. So I was enthusiastic about getting the chance to read his personal views of Hollywood. And while I agree with him that the studio machinery is all about profits and very little about art or craft - when was it ever different? - I was ultimately disappointed by his book. There were times when I just didn't know what he was talking about. I think his writing here is often inaccessible. I may not be the most erudite reader, but Mamet left me cold. I just couldn't get into the style of his writing. I felt distanced rather than drawn in. When I read a book like this, I want to devour it, not pick at its little pieces. You may feel differently, that's fine. The book didn't pull me in the way I'd hoped it would.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By garwood on February 18, 2011
Format: Paperback
It is with reluctance I admit I am having an awfully difficult time with Mamet's 'Bambi vs. Godzilla'. Rarely have I been so irked, and I am only on page 9.

First, his writing is not easy to follow. Jerky, self-absorbed, and smug, the prose lurches from topic to topic within the space of a page (even a paragraph). What may have been a witty aphorism when spoken, falls leaden on the page. Has he ever read his own prose aloud to others?

His central thesis, that the American film industry is in its death throes, has been a constant topic of cassandras for, oh, about 75 years now. Proponents tend to be self-deluded nostalgics with poor memories. As with the novel, or painting and sculpture, the 'art is dead' (or dying or decaying) crowd always look foolish in retrospect. Clearly, Mamet hasn't figured this out.

In the case of film, it has been declared `dead' since the time of `Roman Holiday', if not before. Yet somehow there has appeared `The Godfather', `2001', `The Apartment', 'The Blues Brothers', `Shrek', and host of others (to use only studio films as an example). Does Mamet think they're all junk?

Worse still, the anti-business attitude is off-putting, especially from someone who has made some serious 'shekels' (as he might say) himself in film. Evidently Mamet is unwilling to acknowledge business is a part of life, not to mention human nature.

I should also note, for someone who is so hyper-critical of others, Mamet lacks a genuine humility about himself. He speaks with such inflated self-assurance that clearly he doesn't allow that he could ever be wrong.

Yet he is wrong, wrong about a lot (even beyond his overall thesis).
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By E. Shepard on February 28, 2007
Format: Hardcover
David Mamet is an excellent writer, one of our best. The prose in this book gleams. There's not a word out of place. Every aspiring essay writer should read it.

There's much outrage in "Bambi vs. Godzilla," primarily about the state of the homogenized, dumbed-down modern film industry, but the book never feels like a rant. Mamet's reflections on the movie industry allow him to touch on many, many other subjects - such the state of the unions in America, the importance of craft, Jewish identity in America, and so on. I don't think Mamet expects readers will agree with everything in the book. Likewise, I don't think he is being controversial for the sake of controversy.

His provocative ideas will stimulate some truly interesting discussions, as well as reflections on America, our big movie industry, and what is says about us.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Alan L. Chase VINE VOICE on May 14, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
David Mamet knows how to write - for the stage, for the screen and for reading audiences. His grasp of how to construct dialogue is second to none. "Glengarry Glen Ross," won the Pulitzer Prize - and deservedly so. It is brilliant! I can't remember how many times I have seen "The Spanish Prisoner," and been astonished with each viewing at the way in which Mamet constructed the story. His play, "The Boston Marriage," contains two hours of delicious verbal ripostes and counter-thrusts. I happened to catch an evening performance of the play at the Hasty Pudding Theater in Cambridge on a night when Mamet himself was in the audience.

Mamet's latest literary project is his commentary on the current state of the movie industry: "Bambi vs. Godzilla - On the Nature, Purpose, and Practice of the Movie Business."

Steve Martin's blurb on the dust jacket of the book, with tongue firmly planted in cheek, sums up beautifully the impact that this book will have among Hollywood insiders: "David Mamet is supremely talented. He is a gifted writer and observer of society and its characters. I'm sure he will be able to find work somewhere, somehow, just no longer in the movie business."

Mamet takes the reader behind the scenes of how a movie gets written, shot, edited, marketed and distributed. He gives his unvarnished personal opinion about actors, directors, producers and films he has appreciated - and those he disdains. The book contains a wonderful Appendix that is a compendium of thumbnail descriptions of each of the movies he mentions in the body of the book.
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