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Bananas

October 7, 2003
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Song Title Time Popularity
1 3:34
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2 4:10
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3 4:21
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4 3:28
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5 4:03
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6 7:04
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7 5:11
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8 6:01
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9 3:46
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10 4:50
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11 3:28
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12 1:27
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 7, 2003
  • Label: Sanctuary
  • Copyright: 2003 THAMES RECORDS LTD SUBLICENSED TO SANCTUARY RECORDS GROUP INC UNDER EXCLUSIVE LICENSE TO SANCTUARY RECORDS GROUP LTD
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000QR01IS
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (126 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

Ian Gillan, Steve Morse, Roger Glover and Don Airey are very professional musicians.
JD
The title song has a fabulous groove, great keyboards and harmonica, and a very infectious feel.
G. S. Shridhar
And I think that's what preventing Bananas, a very good album, from being a great one.
Robert Dumas

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Oz Rocker on December 27, 2004
Format: Audio CD
I'm in serious danger of wearing out the grooves of my Bananas CD. Inspired songwriting, superb musicianship and crisp, polished production. But why do I hear criticism of the title and cover? Where's yer sense of humour? Purple at their best were a fun band and this album has the elements I've always loved: dazzling instrumental interplay, grandiose arrangements, Ian Gillan's powerful vocals, oft wry lyrics and the swing of drummer Ian Paice and bassist Roger Glover. On a few tracks they even venture into never before trodden territory - way to go, guys! Making his purple recording debut, keyboard maestro Don Airey leaps onto the roundabout and, in contrast to the new tonalities guitar whiz Steve Morse infused in ninety-five, the Hammond sound we know and love has an air of familiarity.... thanks Don. A credible and incredible lineup of The Purps sans Blackmore and Lord... who'd have thunk it? You see, the challenge of a band with a track record like Deep Purple is that their latest offering will often be compared with their past landmarks, so a word of advice: try to do the impossible and listen to this album as if it were by a new, unknown act. I think you'll be very pleasantly surprised.

House of Pain

A tribute to their long-standing manager, Bruce Payne? I think not. This one kicks off with a four-on-the-floor geetar riff punctuated with cowbell, reminiscent of Take It Off the Top from Morsey's Dixie Dregs repertoire. But with the first banshee scream, that's where the similarity ends. It's a full-throttle rock 'n' roller coaster where "my friends all say I'm losing it big time" and a massive chorus chant that'll need Steve and Roger's support in concert.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 10, 2003
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
A very solid effort by hard rock kings Deep Purple. Purple are now Ian Gillan (Vocals), Roger Glover (Bass), Ian Paice (Drums), Steve Morse (Guitar), and Don Airey (Keyboards). This is obviously Deep Purple minus guitar ace Ritchie Blackmore and the awsomely talented Jon Lord. Incredibly, after the first few notes of the rocking lead off song "The House of Pain" they are not missed for the rest of the record. Ian Gillan's voice and lyrics have not sounded this good in years. Steve Morse's guitar screams, howls, and sings when needed. Don Airey does a great job of contributing with that classic Purple sound via the hammond organ and is a perfect fit for the band. Ian Paice and Roger Glover deliver the groove and beat through-out. This album has it all...hard rocking tunes, blues, an instrumental, and even a ballad. Highlights are the rocking "The House of Pain", the ballad "Haunted", "Walk On" and the bluesy "Picture of Innocence." A superb effort by a legendary band.
Now the comparisons. This is by far the best of the Morse era albums. This is much better than their last effort - Abandon, and if you liked Purpendicular, you'll love this album. This also compares well (although I dare not call Bananas a classic) with Purple classics Machine Head, Fireball, Who Do We Think We Are, and Perfect Strangers. Clearly better than the Rainbow-like Slaves and Masters and The Battle Rages On. This album does not disappoint!
I've listened to it a few times now. I liked it right away but it is growing on me even more. The is a totally outstanding effort.....get it!
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Kim Fletcher on October 17, 2003
Format: Audio CD
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Bananas is a great Hard Rock album by a bunch of top musicians. Deep Purple have been going since 1968 with a break from 1976-1984, during which there was not an actual band called Deep Purple in circulation. So, depending your point of view the band is either celebrating their 27th anniversary, or the 35th. If you do not count the mountains of live albums and compilations, this is their seventeenth studio album. Confused yet? You soon will be.
Bananas is the first release of new material in five years and the first Deep Purple album not to feature the talents of Jon Lord on keyboards, who retired from the band (but not music) last year to make way for Don Airey. This is Airey's first studio outing with the band, and very admirably he does, too. It is lead guitarist Steve Morse's third studio album with Purple, and lead vocalist Ian Gillan's tenth. Bassist Roger Glover counts it as his eleventh, and sitting behind the drums for his seventeenth Deep Purple album is one of the world's finest Rock 'n' Roll drummer, Mr. Ian Paice. He has also played drums at every Deep Purple show that has taken place. When Deep Purple was on a sabbatical from 1976-1984, Ian Paice kept his hand in by drumming for P.A.L., Whitesnake (both of whom featured Jon Lord), and Gary Moore, both in the studio and live in concert. So Ian Paice makes Deep Purple the complete mirror image of Spinal Tap by keeping the drum position the only stable one.
For variation there has never been a Deep Purple album to compare to Bananas. You would have to go back to the heady days of 1972 and Machine Head to find the band in more classic form. Although almost all Deep Purple albums have their good moments, this one has class stamped all the way through the Bananas.
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