Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Baratza G 285 Maestro Conical Burr Grinder
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Baratza G 285 Maestro Conical Burr Grinder


Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
  • Anti Static Design  
  • Grind Coffee For Any Brewing Method
  • Automatic & Manual Operation
  • Swiss Made Grinding Wheels
  • Easy to Clean


Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 7.5 x 7 inches ; 6 pounds
  • Shipping Weight: 6 pounds
  • Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S.
  • ASIN: B0000DDVS2
  • Item model number: G 285
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (59 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #203,442 in Kitchen & Dining (See Top 100 in Kitchen & Dining)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?.


Product Description

The Maestro Conical Burr Grinder is one of the most eye pleasing grinders on the market, but the beauty isn't skin deep. Inside is the heart of a great grinder that can grind coffee beans for any coffee brewer, whether it is an espresso machine, drip coffee maker, or French press coffee maker. The Maestro is designed and assembled in the USA with lots of innovative features built in including a list of unique features requested by some of America 's most respected coffee experts. Some of the most requested features include: smooth, quiet operation, (from enhanced motor noise isolation); conical (coned shaped) Swiss made cutting burrs that give a fine grind critical for perfect espresso extraction and more than a 50% greater grinding adjustment compared to other grinders in its class. You can adjust the grind range from a fine setting for a Turkish grind and espresso, up to a nice, even, coarser grind for a French press.

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

He told me he would trouble shoot and call me back.
Anne
If you end up buying 3 or 4 electric cheapies and discard them, you've spent the equivalent of a decent one.
John S. Socha
I like espresso type grind but had to settle for the coarsest grind it did.
Stoneheart

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By R. Meyers on February 16, 2009
After using a Solis Maestro+ daily for over 5 years I finally broke off the tabs on the adjustment ring (a common problem area).

I replaced it with a Baratza Maestro and am very pleased. The Baratza Maestro has been upgraded and IS NOT the old Solis Maestro. It has both the same motor, same burr set and same adjustment ring as the Maestro Plus. Thankfully, the tabs on the ring have been beefed up. BTW, I was able to move the heavy alloy base from the Maestro+ to the new Maestro.

Now the differences between the two grinders are (1) heavy alloy base which helps to keep the grinder from moving when using the front mounted momentary on switch to grind into a portafilter, (2) the momentary on switch and (3) a count down timer switch on the side instead of an on/off switch. The count down timer is useful if you keep the hopper full of beans and use the timer to control how many beans are ground at one time. If you add a specific volume of beans to the hopper and grind all of them as I do, then the on/off switch is all you need.

These grinders do an excellent job of grinding beans for anything from press to drip. They do an adequate job for espresso. If you drink mostly drip and an occasional espresso drink, I think you will be happy. If Starbucks is your standard, you will probably be thrilled! And if you have a $2000+ semi-auto espresso machine you're probably not reading this anyway. Enjoy.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
37 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Burton on September 24, 2008
I've owned this grinder for a year. I needed a cheap burr grinder with a good reputation, capable of properly grinding beans for espresso (a difficult task). At $99, the Maestro was the best choice to accompany my Starbucks Barista (manufactured by Saeco), bought locally through craigslist. I'm not crazy about the pressurized portafilter (nor are most espresso drinkers) but this is best I can do until I get out of grad school and can afford the Silvia.

Procedure: I buy freshly roasted beans, grind them with the finest grind, preheat the portafilter, and tamp with an aftermarket aluminum tamper.

The result: weak espresso that runs fast and lacks flavor and crema. In one year I have never pulled a good shot--just mediocre shots that are better in mixed than straight--and I can still taste the poor quality when mixed.

To investigate, I broke one major rule and ground the beans ahead of time with Whole Food's commercial grinder in the store (ideally, you grind seconds before brewing--I brewed the next day). Next day, same routine. Results: delicious, near perfect shots, worth sipping and savoring. Dark red crema, slow pulls, complex flavor. I never pulled a shot like this before.

Conclusion: I'll be grinding my beans in the store from now on. It wasn't the machine, it was the grinder. So don't buy the Maestro if you want good espresso, it WILL NOT do the job. ("minor" side note: for those interested in good drip and french press coffee, the Maestro is a great choice).

To quote coffeegeek.com: "I can make a better shot of espresso with a $200 espresso machine and a $400 grinder than I can with a $2,000 espresso machine and no grinder (or a blade grinder)... and it's absolutely true."
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Monica Mowry on October 20, 2006
What a failed design. I never thought grinding my own coffee could bring so much despair and frustration, but truly it has. One must stand watch over this grinder as if it were a stubborn, disobedient child.

Imagine this: You've turned the timer knob as far as it allows. The grinder whirs loudly as few beans are ground. At first, you shake the grinder to coax beans into the burrs, but it doesn't help. Next, you manually shove beans down in the hopper with a small spatula. Coffee dust quickly spreads across your counter, creating a mess. Suddenly, the timer stops. You find you're left enough grinds for three-to-four scoops. You feel defeated, but you soldier on. Repeat this procedure three times until you have enough grinds for a full pot of coffee. Now wait, you're almost done! Finish your task by vacuuming the counter, grinder and floor below you with a DustBuster.

Without one iota of exaggeration, and I swear by the God who guides me, this is the most aggravating kitchen appliance I have ever owned. And I paid upwards of $100 for it!

Bottom line: If you love coffee and wish to protect your sanity, look elsewhere for a grinder. This is NOT what you want. As one human trying earnestly to help another, I beg of you to heed my warning.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
33 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Stoneheart on September 29, 2007
When I decided to buy a coffee grinder and espresso machine, I researched and read reviews and thought "This is the one!" Unfortunately, it never lived up to its name. After the first few weeks, it wouldn't grind unless you constantly jiggled it to get the beans to seat in the grinder. Yes, I took it apart and cleaned and dried it as per manufacturer's instructions, but it would NEVER grind the beans very fine. I like espresso type grind but had to settle for the coarsest grind it did. As the months wore on, it just got worse. I finally got to the point where I had to use a wooden spoon handle to force the beans into the grinder. I know this sounds ridiculous, but I had spent $140 on this thing and I didn't want to just throw it away. Maybe if you used an extremely "dry" or slightly undercooked roast, it would work better? This used to be made by Solis. I would NEVER recommend their coffee grinders. I do have a Solis espresso machine that I purchased at the same time as the coffee grinder and it works well.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews