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Barbara Ireland'sThe New York Times 36 Hours: 150 Weekends in the USA & Canada [Hardcover]2011 Hardcover – 2011

4.7 out of 5 stars 80 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Taschen (2011)
  • ASIN: B006MHBQ8A
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (80 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,704,887 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Flexibound
As someone who has loves travel but has limited time off, the 36 hours format is great. I know having used a few of these columns that they can mean the difference between a sort of rudderless long weekend somewhere, and a better choreographed experience. Full guidebooks are often overwhelming and a little soulless for my taste, and this is different. There are practical suggestions but the columns also convey a real sense of what it's like to be immersed in a place, and they address the reality that most people aren't able to get as much time as they'd like in a specific spot. Frankly, even if the trips aren't ones that I'll be able to make anytime soon, just sampling the book gives a vicarious experience.
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By Longreader on December 17, 2011
Format: Flexibound
As an avid reader of the New York Times 36 Hours feature for years, I have been waiting for this book. Not only is the guide a fun read for an armchair traveler like myself but it's the ultimate weekend planner for the literate by the literate--where even Oklahoma City can be as alluring as Paris. Though the guide leans a bit to the hip versus the vital for some destinations it makes readers intelligent insiders to every major spot in the US at the rate of about five minutes per stop. Addicting.
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Format: Flexibound Verified Purchase
Got this as a present for my sister's birthday, since she loves to travel but has a job that keeps her busy for most of the time. So this is perfect for her. Her and her man went to two of the detailed cities, hopefully doing the third for their honeymoon.
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I have been reading the "36 Hours" columns for many years. I used to cut them out and save them but lately have used the internet to find the columns that I needed. This book makes it much easier to find what I want and I have enjoyed reading many of the columns again. Also got some new ideas for short trips.

I wish they would publish 2 other books of New York Times travel columns. The "Practical Traveler" column is packed full of useful information and would make a great book for anyone interested in travel . . . . . and why not a second volume of the "36 Hours" column featuring foreign destinations? I would buy both of them. I'd bet that many people would.
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Format: Flexibound
This is really a great book for both the armchair traveler and anyone wanting to visit a city for the weekend. For the former, you get a breezy style and vicarious sense of what it's like to go. For the latter, it's an accessible way to go on a tour where all the major hot spots have been vetted for you and narrowed down to a sort of top 10 list.
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This is a review from the standpoint of a travel guide enthusiast. If you love the NYT 36 hours then go ahead and get it but if your looking for an actual travel guide this review is for you. The title should read: "Young Hipsters Guide To Alcoholism And Pedantry." This book is a good guideline for an itinerary but nothing more. I got it for its coffee table flair really. Anyone who actually follows these itineraries must be dead for the amount of sugar, alcohol and comfort food it has you consume at the expense of seeing real sites. It's not a travel guide at all. It is exactly what it said: the NYT's list of what it's editors and writers would do on their weekends off down to the hour. So you see the type of crowd it draws and you get the sense that the only thing it recommends is itineraries for the overly touristy type or people obsessed with looking cool and fashionable rather than experiencing a city. I love DK eyewitness guides over this but the book looks great and enticing on a table or shelf and is a great read for a tipsy guest who needs some perusing time before he plans his next social move at your house. Otherwise, as a personal read to spark the traveling bug in us all, it falls flat many times making the itineraries sound boring with poor choices of photos that make you glad you have used up all your vacation days already or happy your not traveling to said place. You find this out by checking the itinerary for your own city to find how it sounds like the worst way to spend 36 hours in "_____ City." Some itineraries are great but then again, you didn't buy this book for just some itineraries; you were hoping it would have a great aid in making a short weekend entertaining at all the locations in the US instead of thinking that the best weekend that a location has to offer is candy stores, cocktails and overhyped restaurants. 2 stars for table flair, 1 star for substance and an aid in traveling.
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As the title says, this isn't like Fodors, where it seems like the only things recommended are tourist traps.

I'm originally from Kansas City, and I looked it up. Turns out, it actually recommends restaurants that are lesser known, and stuff to see/do that I would recommend to others.

I did the same for Baltimore - where I now live, and the recommendations are pretty much about as good.

So, at least from looking up cities I know well, this book seems to pick out cool stuff to see and do, rather than the worn out tourist destinations. Sure, there are some of the touristy things included, but it isn't only that, which is what I'd expect from a Fodors or other travel books.
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I bought this for my mother-in-law for Christmas because she and my father-in-law love to travel and often run off for the weekend. She loves this book and they've already taken a trip and set up another based on suggestions in this book. We are so glad we found it.
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