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Barely Famous Hits

August 2, 2005 | Format: MP3

$9.99
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:52
30
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4:04
30
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3:55
30
4
4:03
30
5
4:59
30
6
4:04
30
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3:45
30
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3:14
30
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4:17
30
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4:02
30
11
4:27
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12
3:36
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: August 2, 2005
  • Release Date: August 2, 2005
  • Label: BNA Records Label
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 47:18
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001D7DW1S
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #277,765 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
I don't normally review Greatest Hits packages, but since A) there aren't any real major hits on this collection (something the brothers themselves admit!) and B) I didn't get into the Warren Brothers until their last release so, since a lot of this material is pretty much new to me, I figured "What the heck?" Any promotion is good promotion, right? That said, I'm glad this album came out...I fell in love with 2004's brilliant WELL DESERVED OBSCURITY, after being turned on to the Warren's via Nashville Star, but I was hesitant to pick up their first two albums, not knowing if the material would be similar or as powerful. Judging from the strength of the early material, I'm going to have to rethink that line of thought. In fact, it's the earlier material that sounds the best....the three songs from OBSCURITY have (sadly) been remixed, losing most of the charm and punch that initially made them so fresh and energetic. All three cuts now have a...sameness...to them, sort of a bad demo quality. Do yourself a favor and check out WDO for far-superior versions of "Change", "Comeback" and "Sell Alot Of Beer." Because of this, we'll just be concentrating on the older songs in this review. After "Change" opens things up, we seque into the thought-provoking "What We Can't Have." This "the-grass-is-always-greener" mid-tempo rocker sails along with a nice, steady groove, earnestly doling out lyrics from the viewpoint of the singer, a member of the audience, a bar patron and the bartender. When Brett Warren sings the lines "We all want what we can't have/It's enough to drive you mad" you're taken aback by both the truth and the sadness therein. Special note also has to be made of Brad Warren's sterling guitar work. There's an aching beauty to "Greyhound Bus" that is almost palpable...Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
The Warren Brothers are probably the most under-rated act in country music. They are great live performers, which is why acts like Tim McGraw and Brooks & Dunn continue to book them to open their shows, even though radio does not embrace their music. Lead singer Brett Warren is one of the most expressive vocalists in any genre of music, able to sell the tender love song "That's The Beat Of The Heart" and the rowdy rocker "Guilty" with equal facility. Collectively, the brothers contribute harmonies of a tightness not heard in Nashville since the heyday of Foster & Lloyd.

This cd is a decent retrospective of the Warrens' first three albums. The top 30 hit "Hey Mr. President" appears on a Warren Brothers album for the first time, while two of their higher charting singles are strangely omitted: the rockabilly charmer "She Likes To Rock" and the earnest ballad "Better Man." They can be found on the Warrens' 1998 debut cd Beautiful Day In The Cold Cruel World. The collection's highlight is its leadoff single "Change," the theme song for the Warren Brothers' CMT series Barely Famous. It's received little airplay, despite being catchier than anything else currently being played at country radio.
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Format: Audio CD
The Warren Brothers are an amazing duo who sadly, aren't praised as much as they should be. These guys have too much potential to let them go to waste. The only reason that they're "barely famous" is because of the audience they're trying to appeal to. They want to be heard by the bubble gum country listeners that jump on whatever bandwagon sounds good for the time. The thing is though, that the people that can actually make them big are too busy listening to that same bubble gum country music. So now that I'm done with my personal vendetta, on with the review...

The songs on this album really prove what they are trying to become. There's not a track on this album that I don't like. The songs are all catchy yet meaningful. It proves their ability as not only performers, but as artists. I don't own any of their previous albums but after this one I bought all of them to see what other hiddens talents they possess. I think they deserve long overdue credit for their musical abilities. I would highly suggest buying this c.d.
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Format: Audio CD
First of all, please ignore the references to Nashville Star, The TV show Barely Famous, etc {both good shows...but,} please just listen to their music.

In my opinion, they are a refreshing change. Almost "Country Rock". I love to hear the guitar in their songs.

With his CD, I was disappointed at first when I heard "Sell a Lot of Beer" because it wasn't the commercial version I'd heard on the radio. This version starts as almost acoustic. Then after listening to it a few times, it grew on me to the point that I was embarrassed that I had fallen in to the "Commercial" trap and didn't really listen to this different version with an open mind. Once I did I loved it.

These guys are immensely talented whether they are performing their own songs, or letting another artist do it. {They've written for Tim McGraw, Faith Hill, Lynyrd Skynrd, Van Zant among others. That speaks for itself.
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Format: Audio CD
Though they've plied charted four tunes in the midlands of the Billboard country chart, appeared as judges on Nashville Star, and hosted their own show on CMT, the Warren Brothers' music is more firmly rooted in the country-rock of The Eagles, the heartland music of John Mellancamp, and the power-balladry of Bryan Adams. Their trio of CDs for BNA (the last of which didn't make it out of BNA's doors) never found great commercial success, but their loyal fanbase and the flurry of TV activity has provided the marketing motor for this reissue. These dozen tracks were plucked from all three of the brothers' BNA CDs (including 3 titles from their unreleased third), and adds the theme song "Change" from their CMT program, "Barely Famous."

As songwriters, the Warrens have a surprisingly wry edge for Nashville - just check out the album's title and their very knowing bar-band hoot, "Sell a Lot of Beer." The Warrens write playful and sarcastic, but they're effective with warm and sentimental. Brett Warren is a moving vocalist, with just enough edge to keep his power ballads from sounding like hackneyed arena fodder. Brad Warren's guitar playing provides a great deal more emotion than the standard Nashville studio picker would likely muster for the duo's rock-based compositions. The fiddles and dobro are decoration more than core elements, but they provide leavening that keeps these tracks out of the middle of the road.

Those who've just recently latched onto the Warren's through their TV work will find this disc to be a solid introduction to their catalog, pulling in tracks from their two BNA albums, the unreleased third LP (some of whose tracks appeared on the indie released "Well Deserved Obscurity"), the multi-artist "Patriotic Country" collection, and the CMT show theme that will draw the most new listeners to the Warrens' catalog. 3-3/4 stars if allowed fractional ratings. [©2005 hyperbolium dot com]
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