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Bargaining for Advantage : Negotiation Strategies for Reasonable People Paperback – May 1, 2000

ISBN-13: 978-0140281910 ISBN-10: 0140281916 Edition: Reissue

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Reissue edition (May 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140281916
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140281910
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #211,624 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

G. Richard Shell is an award-winning teacher and scholar at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He was named one of the country's top business school professors in Business Week's Guide to the Best Business Schools in 1993 and 1999. His articles on negotiation and dispute resolution have appeared in such publications as the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times.

More About the Author

G. Richard Shell is the Thomas Gerrity Professor of Legal Studies, Business Ethics, and Management at the Wharton School of Business. His latest book, Springboard: Launching Your Personal Search for Success (Penguin/Portfolio 2013), was named Best Business Book of the Year for 2013 by one of the largest business booksellers in the United States, 800CEOREAD. His earlier works include the award-winning Bargaining for Advantage: Negotiation Strategies for Reasonable People (2006) and The Art of Woo: Using Strategic Persuasion to Sell Your Ideas (2007)(with Mario Moussa). He is Director of the Wharton Executive Negotiation Workshop and the Wharton Strategic Persuasion Workshop. He has taught thousands of students and executives, including everyone from Navy SEALs and Fortune 500 CEOs to FBI hostage negotiators, hospital nurses, and public school teachers.

Customer Reviews

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See all 26 customer reviews
Richard's experience in conducting various workshops shows on how he presents himself in this wonderful book.
Anil G.Nalkur
First, the writing was excellent -- easy to read, yet not simplistic; interesting enough that I actually enjoyed it; and extremely well organized.
Nicholas Kruse
Whether you're an experienced negotiator, or shudder at the thought of any type of conflict, this book will help improve your negotiating skills.
davids@amazon.com

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

93 of 95 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 14, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I had always been under two false impressions about negotiations. First, that negotiations are all about business and commercial transactions. Second, that negotiations are about hardball tactics where the stronger side "wins" and gets away with a great deal while the weaker side is beaten down and suckered into a raw deal.
Richard Shell's book completely changed this impression. This is a book that is well written and the ideas are structured in way that I could read and take away bite-sized chunks. The book is also very practical and ends each section with a checklist to be used when you negotiate. Shell has made the book very readable by not going overboard on negotiations theories and sprinkling the book with some terrific stories. The stories range from negotiation strategies employed by Mahatma Gandhi and Akio Morita to Indonesian villagers and Tanzanian tribesmen.
The main message of the book is that negotiations are mostly about relationships and that each party may have something to offer that is of enormous value to the other party. By building your relationship and unearthing that value you can conclude a successful negotiation where everybody leaves the boardroom or village center with satisfaction. Shell draws his rich material from many negotiating situations (e.g.-: kids negotiating with their parents about dinner, an elderly widow negotiating with real estate tycoon Donald Trump, and the negotiations for buying out RJR Nabisco). He has also drawn on negotiating styles from around the world and compared the cultural differences (e.g.-: Gandhi negotiating in South Africa, the importance of networks or Guanxi in Chinese cultures, etc.
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Denis Benchimol Minev on February 11, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is an improvement on what "Getting to Yes" tries to achieve. It is much more descriptive of the mechanisms of negotiation, with often three or four stories, as opposed to one for each topic in "Getting to Yes". It breaks down negotiation into four parts (Preparation, Information Exchange, Bargain, and Settlement), and goes into each in depth, with many stories (the most I have seen in a negotiation book, which I appreciate). Also tackles the negotiation process from the standpoint of people who are very competitive and from the standpoint fo people that are non-confrontational, which I found useful as well.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy Hildreth on January 7, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Who knew that a business "how to" book could also be an enormously enjoyable and enlightening treatise on human relationships? Shell combines psychology, sociology, morality, and economics (and decades of personal and professional experience) to offer lessons you will not only want to do business by, but also to live by. "Bargaining for Advantage" will help you gain as much of an upper hand as you are comfortable gaining -- in any business situation -- and be happy doing it. Best of all, by nonfiction standards, it's a page turner. Buy it without hesitation. You'll be glad you did.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Michael Costas on December 23, 2005
Format: Paperback
Shell's new book is great. He offers a roadmap of ideas to help you negotiate, and it's fun reading. He breaks the book into two basic parts. THe first part talks about six foundations of effective negotiation, ranging from setting goals and expectations to finding points of leverage. The second part offers advice on the negotiation process (e.g., preparation, making concessions, etc.)

His book seems to suggest, however, that negotiating is a rational endeavor. Even the advice on building relationships seems mechanical rather than natural (e.g., giving gifts, favors, etc). This all may work, but I'd find some of the advice hard to do in some of my negotiations with tougher clients who I deal with time and again.

Overall, Shell's book is great, but my own personal style of negotiation is more in line with the new negotiation bestseller by Roger Fisher of Harvard -- "Beyond Reason: Using EMotions as YOu Negotiate." Beyond Reason offers 5 principles that I could easily remember to improve my negotiating effectiveness -- and without seeming mechanical or inauthentic.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas Kruse on February 10, 2003
Format: Hardcover
G. Richard Shell's book on negotiation was my first read on the topic, aside from a little Dorling Kindersley guide. This is not a book to teach you how to be a cutthroat or hardball negotiator, it is a book designed to help YOU get the best solution every time.
The author is to be commended for a number of achievements in this book. First, the writing was excellent -- easy to read, yet not simplistic; interesting enough that I actually enjoyed it; and extremely well organized. Unlike maky other books, the anecdotes are both interesting and well-used to illustrate his points.
Second, the author presents guidance on a wide range of issues. One section helps you identify your bargaining style and then gives you suggestions on how to maximize its effectiveness. Another offers advice on how your strategy should change based on the relationship (or lack thereof) between the two parties. This book is not just for MBAs; it's for all people, since everyone negotiates in various forms with everyone else.
Third, the book achieves an excellent balance between theory and practice. Shell refers to numerous psychology and economics experiments to describe the ideas beneath the negotiation process, but he also gives real-world advice on how to put these ideas to work.
Finally, a section on ethics is included which, although enlightening enough to provide a basic knowledge of legal, moral, and practical implications of various bargaining strategies, is really only a primer to a much larger topic.
Again, this was a truly excellent book, especially for anyone looking for a first read on the topic.
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