Barnacle Love and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Barnacle Love has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Library Sale Item.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Barnacle Love Paperback – August 31, 2010


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.95
$0.48 $0.01

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
$13.95 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Barnacle Love + Almost Gone (Portuguese in the Americas Series)
Price for both: $30.95

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Algonquin Books (August 31, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1565129261
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565129269
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.7 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,658,206 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In De Sa's debut, a father and son narrate a revelatory, if disjointed, story spanning two generations of Portuguese-Canadian immigrants. Escaping the abuse and overbearing expectations of his mother as well as a pedophile priest, young Manuel Rebelo flees his small Portuguese village on a fishing boat in 1954, finding his promised land in St. John, Newfoundland. Through a number of trials, including a near-drowning at sea, betrayal by his rescuers, and the threat of deportation, Manuel pursues the ghost of his father (who died at sea) and an apparition Manuel calls Big Lips, a fish who appears in times of need and contemplation. Leaping ahead to the 1970s, readers find Manuel married with two children, and living in Toronto's Portuguese neighborhood. From there, Manuel's six-year-old son, Antonio, takes over the narration, precociously chronicling his father's descent into alcoholism, disillusionment, and bitterness. The sudden change in narration underscores the novel's general sense of disorientation; readers will likely find Manuel's journey from victimized altar boy to villainous father jarring, as if, in the confusion, De Sa left out part of the story.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

*Starred Review* A novel divided into two distinct halves ordinarily suffers from problems due to the interruption in the narrative. Not so here; the two parts of this intelligent yet passionate novel merge seamlessly into a double-layered, twice as effective, doubly meaningful story, which is usually what is intended by such a structure, but which in other authors’ hands, too often fails to materialize. Granted, the theme is not new: the emigrant-immigrant experience from Europe to the New World. But the particular circumstances that De Sa creates in which to let these experiences play out, as well as his presentation of a deeply flawed main character nevertheless performing the heroic act of leaving home for an unforeseen future, give the tale its distinctiveness. As a young man, Manuel Rebelo leaves his hometown on the Azores Islands (a territory of Portugal), embarking on a fishing boat to flee the confinement of his limited prospects. He jumps ship in Nova Scotia, eventually settling down in Toronto with his wife and family to do what immigrants always intend: to seek a better life. Bringing family history full circle, and in the process cementing the novel’s two halves, Manuel impresses his confinement on his son, who, in turn, wants to make his escape, in this instance from the Portuguese neighborhood of Toronto. A beautiful musical piece stating and repeating its profoundly moving melody. --Brad Hooper

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
50%
4 star
0%
3 star
50%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Tony Medeiros on November 6, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Saudades is a vague and constant desire for something that does not and probably cannot exist, for something other than the present, a turning towards the past or towards the future; not an active discontent or poignant sadness but an indolent dreaming wistfulness. This was the feeling I got when I read Anthony De Sa's book called Barnacle Love.

Anthony De Sa is a Canadian author who writes about the Portuguese experience as told to him by his Iberian entourage who survived the immigrant experience from the Azores. His book Barnacle Love is a great expenditure in world literature and one to be proud as Portuguese of any decent, no matter how diluted your roots are from the source of your ancestry. It is a testament to their origins.

It is apropos to call the book Barnacle Love. Barnacles are some of the oldest living organisms in the ocean with thick shells and are vulnerable inside. They attach themselves to hard surfaces and don't budge from there. The Portuguese spirit is the same. When they are transfixed on an idea, they stay glued from the constant beating barrage of waves that come from the ocean. Be it faith or tradition they will not move. They don't want to let go. The ocean being the world of ideas tries to pull them to the sea. With no avail they stay true to their convictions. Fixed they are and they shall remain.

Books are vessels for your brain to traverse from one place to another. Your destination can be a place of gratification or just plain exhaustion from frustration. Barnacle Love is unique because it speaks of the Azorean culture within Canada. There are not too many books on the spirit of the Azores. Anthony De Sa is a brilliant writer of ideas. His book is short of being called a novella. It is many stories combined to make one whole story.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By James W. Fonseca on July 28, 2013
Format: Paperback
A story of a Portuguese immigrant from the Azores islands to the Portuguese Community in St. John's, Newfoundland and then to Toronto. It's actually two stories - one of the father and one of the son. We compare the life of the immigrant father from a dirt-poor rural village where the only escape is to go to sea fishing, and the son who grows up in urban Toronto. The father struggles to maintain some of his traditional values; the son struggles to find any values. The writing is excellent (blurb by Colm Toibin) and is as much a collection of interrelated short stories as a novel. The Portuguese do whatever they have to do to survive: frugal rural life tending crops and animals; fishing for cod in an isolated dory in deadly seas, or being a custodian in urban Toronto. Like Home Is an Island: A Novel (Portuguese in the Americas Series) by Alfred Lewis, Saudade by Katherine Vaz and The Undiscovered Island (Portuguese in the Americas Series) by Darrell Kastin, this book is a part of the growing and excellent literature by Azoreans in the United States and Canada.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition
It's the 1950s in Portugal. As the oldest son, Manuel's mother has high hopes for him. Manual wants to leave his small village and experience the world so he gets a job on a fishing boat which will take him off the coast of Newfoundland. Despite the guilt that he feels about leaving his family and disappointing his mother, he settles in Canada and looks forward to the endless possibilities and making something of himself.

Fast forward and it's the 1970s and Manuel is now married, living in Toronto and has two children. They "live" in the Palmerston/Queen Street W area ... just east of my 'hood so I knew a lot of the landmarks mentioned. Though they (and the rest of his family) are now living in Toronto, they still have the same traditions from home such as butchering pigs in garages and making their own wine. None of Manuel's dreams have come true and he sees himself as a failure. He wants to make sure that same doesn't happen to his children. But the same pressures his mother put on him, he is putting on his son, Antonio. It was sad to see that optimistic Manuel had turned into bitter Manuel.

This is the second book I've read by this author. I had read Kicking the Sky (written in 2013) a couple years go, which took an experience from Barnacle Love and expanded on it.

It's a sad depressing story. I found the writing a bit draggy in places and it could have been tighter. It a bit confusing at times as the author jumped back and forth in time a bit. Manuel's story in the 1950s (the first part of the book) was written in third person perspective and Antonio's story in the 1970s is written in first person perspective from Antonio's point of view. I found this a bit confusing too until I figured out whose voice it was.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Barnacle Love has been sitting on my bookshelf for a couple of years now. I’m not sure why it took me this long to read it, but this week I became curious and decided to give it a try. Honestly, I expected more. Here are my thoughts:
* I liked the Portuguese words interwoven into the text, especially mãe and filho—words that transmit emotions that can never be translated. (Of course, there was also saudade, but that in itself has become a LusoAmerican writer cliché.)
* Speaking of clichés, I did not like the abused by a priest plotline.
* Although I enjoyed the beginning of the book, I started to lose interest in Manuel as the story progressed. I was annoyed by the jumps in the narrative and was sometimes unsure when exactly things were happening. It’s hard to pinpoint exactly how Manuel became the man he became, and I’d like to know more about the process. The second part of the book, the story of Manuel’s son Antonio, I liked because it is the story of many people I know, the children of immigrants who have to find a balance between two countries and two homes.
* One random pet peeve: I find it hard to believe that this Azorian town was really as backwards as he makes it seem. I mean, it was the 60s and 70s! Were the islands living in a different world from the mainland(?) because things were not like that at all in my tiny town in northern Portugal.
* I expected more from the title “Barnacle Love”—I kept waiting for it to make a comeback in the narrative. Sure, there was a subtle allusion in the second to last story; but I think it was really too subtle. Also, I would have liked to see more emphasis placed on the Big Lips imagery (I hesitate to call it symbolism). Like barnacle love, big lips also never made his way back into the story.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

Anthony De Sa grew up in Toronto's Portuguese community. His short fiction has been published in several North American literary magazines. Anthony's first book, Barnacle Love, was critically acclaimed and became a finalist for the 2008 Scotiabank Giller Prize and the 2009 Toronto Book Award. Anthony's new novel, Kicking the Sky, is set in 1977, the year a twelve-year-old shoeshine boy named Emanuel Jaques was brutally raped and murdered in Toronto. Anthony graduated from University of Toronto and Queen's University. He is currently a teacher-librarian at Michael Power/St. Joseph High School. He lives in Toronto with his wife and three boys.

@antiole

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Barnacle Love
This item: Barnacle Love
Price: $13.95
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com