Industrial-Sized Deals Shop all Back to School Shop Men's Hightops Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon David Ramirez $5 Off Fire TV Stick Off to College Essentials Shop Popular Services hog hog hog  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Nintendo Digital Games Shop Back to School with Amazon Back to School with Amazon Outdoor Recreation Deal of the Day
Barrio Boy: 40th Anniversary Edition (Holt McDougal Library) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Barrio Boy 1st Edition

18 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0268004415
ISBN-10: 0268004412
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used
$4.01
Condition: Used - Good
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed! Good readable copy. Worn edges and covers and may have small creases. The cover may have wear and if there is a dustjacket, it may have normal wear. There may be light writing or highlighting. All pages are present and item is in good condition.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
83 Used from $0.01
More Buying Choices
26 New from $4.49 83 Used from $0.01 1 Collectible from $4.15
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Best Books of the Year So Far
Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2015's Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
Available from these sellers.

Editorial Reviews

Review

“In 1971, at the age of sixty-six, the labour activist, educator and scholar Ernesto Galarza (1905-1984) published Barrio Boy, a memoir of the long migration of his family from a small village in the Sierra Madre to California. Barrio Boy immediately became a classic of Chicano literature, and on its fortieth anniversary has now been published in a new edition with an introduction by the critic, biographer and short-story writer Ilan Stavans.” —Times Literary Supplement 


“Galarza’s book is about growing up—first in Mexico, then in America. To this reader, it is on the same artistic level as Black Boy or Call It Sleep or even Huckleberry Finn. . . . As with Wright and Roth and Twain, we are given a near-perfect tale of rising from absolute poverty to middle-class security, but instead of a woeful recounting, it is filled with the joy of discovery: from living in the lively muddy streets of a small village in Nayarit to surviving, wide-eyed, in the lively and noisy barrios of Sacramento.” —RALPH: The Review of Arts, Literature, Philosophy and the Humanities 


“The 40th anniversary edition of Galarza’s book, now a standard text in high school and college classrooms, has become so popular that it has . . . achieved the dubious honor of being the subject of study guides and essays available for purchase online.” —Occidental College
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Born in Jalcocotán, Nayarit, Mexico, ERNESTO GALARZA (1905–1984) was a civil rights and labor activist, a scholar, and a pioneer during the decades when Mexican Americans had few public advocates. When he was eight, he migrated to Sacramento, California, where he worked as a farm laborer. One of Stanford's first Chicano alumni, Galarza received an M.A. in 1929, and a Ph.D. in history from Columbia University in 1944. He returned to California where, during the 1950s, he joined the effort to create the first multiracial farm worker union, which set the foundation for the emergence of the United Farm Workers Union of the 1960s.

His books most notably include the 1964 Merchants of Labor, on the exploitation of Mexican contract workers, and the 1971 Barrio Boy. In 1979, Dr. Galarza was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: University of Notre Dame Press; 1 edition (August 31, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0268004412
  • ISBN-13: 978-0268004415
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,283,752 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Raquelita on April 21, 2003
Format: Paperback
I came on this book by chance and read it in two sittings. As a North American who has lived in Mexico for four years, I found myself connecting with something on every page about Ernesto Galarza's life in Western Mexico until he was six and then following him until he was a teenager in Sacramento. After reading how the Mexican Revolution affected his family's decisions, I want to read more about Mexican history of the period. The book is notable for Galarza's ear and eye as he paints the details of village life, the series of moves in Mexico, and the many decisions the Galarza family made as they moved step by step away from physical danger. The last parts of the book about life in a Sacramento barrio interested me less but still kept me reading.
When I closed the book I went on the internet to learn more about Galarza. I found out he became a leading organizer and scholar constantly involved in Hispanic life but his book would be memorable even if he had led a more commonplace adult life.
On a lighter note, his account of appearing as a first-grader in a Cinco de Mayo performance was so vivid I didn't know whether to laugh or cry. Readers who were bored by this book may have been assigned to read it in school. I think Barrio Boy would be an excellent read before before going to Mexico--it's a pageturner that can deepen the Mexican experience for the imaginative traveler.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By w jones on February 1, 2000
Format: School & Library Binding
"Barrio Boy" is an important historical document, as it presents through various aspects of local color the Mexican community as it appeared in the early twentieth century. It is also important as a chronicle of the Diaz dictatorship and of the forces that made a family, against bitter odds, migrate to southwestern California.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 20, 1999
Format: Paperback
I have used Galarza's book successfully in many classes I have taught. While there is a lot of apparently "needless" detail if you are looking for some kind of exciting "story" or plot, if you actually read the (very short author's) introduction to the book, you'll realize that Galarza's "point" in writing was to establish what it was like to move from a small pueblo in Mexico to a large US city. As such, there are a lot of details which are not necessarily related to "action" per se, but more a sense of trying to understand new environments, new cultural traditions, new ways of living. And how life in the US affected Mexican migrant families in the early 20th century. If you are looking for an account of Mexican immigration & acculturation that is both personal and subtly historic/sociological, then this is a good book for that.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By w jones on February 1, 2000
Format: School & Library Binding
"Barrio Boy" is important for its local color accounts of the Mexican community in the early twentieth century. It is also important for its chronicle of the Diaz dictatorship and the forces that made one family migrate to southwestern California. In short, it is an important cultural and historical chronicle.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 23, 2002
Format: School & Library Binding
This is one of the most capturing stories I have read of an immigrant coming to the U.S. It was like hearing the stories told time and time again by my parents and grandparents. I have read it twice, once in high school and again in college. Both times Ernesto Galarza was able to draw me into his journey and allowed me to travel along side him, while experiencing a tremendous journey made by thousands.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bob Newman VINE VOICE on December 29, 2012
Format: Paperback
I liked reading BARRIO BOY 32 years ago, but having forgotten it completely, I recently re-read it and enjoyed it as much the second time. It's a humorous story of a kid growing up in a remote Mexican mountain village, moving to town, then to a city, while Mexico thrashed in the throes of the great revolution that lasted for ten bloody years. Eventually the eight year old Ernesto arrives at the American border, then goes to live with his mother and uncle in the working class section of Sacramento, California. The story leaves off as he is about to enter high school, so the recollections are of early childhood and boyhood only. The detail of everything is fantastic. Galarza must have had an amazing memory, or else he filled in the gaps by talking with his older relatives. The story moves along, never getting boring. More than anything else, this book gives you the feel of life in the Mexico of those times from the point of view of one who lived it, not just observed it. As it is the point of view of a kid, naturally there is little introspection or thinking about deeper meanings, overall trends, or the wider picture. You don't ever find out what happened to him, but if you look into it, you'll find that he was one of the first Chicanos to graduate from Stanford and got a Ph.D from Columbia too, becoming active in the labor movement. This guy was a bright spark all right. Bright colors as in a child's life, animals, sounds, special effects, unusual neighbors----these are marvelously portrayed, as are his observations of the differences between Mexicans and `gringos', not to mention other nationalities he met in California. His uncles, his mother, his feelings about his absent father---these hardly surface at all.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: hispanic