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Barron's Trigonometry the Easy Way (E-Z Trigonometry) 2 Sub Edition

25 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0812043891
ISBN-10: 0812043898
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Product Details

  • Series: E-Z Trigonometry
  • Paperback: 310 pages
  • Publisher: Barrons Educational Series Inc; 2 Sub edition (August 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812043898
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812043891
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 7.8 x 10.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,457,506 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Kevin C. Layman on August 13, 1998
Format: Paperback
Trigonometry the Easy Way is an excellent way to learn trig. The best thing about this book is author's teaching method: it is completely inductive. The book is in the form of a fantasy story that takes place in an imaginary kingdom. The reader discovers trig as the characters in the story discover it. From their experiences, the characters draw principles or formulas of trigonometry. Most math books take a deductive approach: they present the general principles first, then apply them. I find that the inductive approach works much better, because the student learns to understand, rather than memorize, the principles. I highly recommend this book.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Patricia Paterson on May 13, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is terrific! My friend, a lifelong math-phobe, was making a last-ditch effort to pass Trigonometry -- the final class she needed in order to graduate with her Bachelor of Science degree. She was trying again for the third time (both her previous attempts had ended in WPs) when she found Trigonometry The Easy Way. The biggest problem she was having was this: while the college textbook gave the formulas, it didn't give her the "why" that she needed in order to understand when the formulas needed to be applied. Memorizing formulas is one thing; understanding when to use them is quite another. She and I (a reknowned math-moron) formed a study group, using Trig The Easy Way. We found that it filled the gaps, allowing both of us to gain a basic understanding of the reasons behind trig. It's written in a simple, fun, storybook-style, and it explains the practical reasons behind the formulas, not just the dry calculations. By using Trig The Easy Way in conjunction with her textbook, my friend passed her class. She made a B, in what had previously been an impossible subject. I can't recommend this book highly enough for people needing a simple way to understand a difficult subject. And in fact, now that she's studying for her doctorate in psychology, she's planning on buying a copy of Statistics The Easy Way, too. You can't argue with success.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 9, 2001
Format: Paperback
I think Trigonometry the Easy Way is a fairly good book. I read it, it made sense to me, and the storyline was rather interesting. It does have some problems: The exercises at the end of each chapter are much harder than what was covered in the main part of the chapter, there are relatively few examples, and the principles of trigonometry are introduced in an unclear way. An example of this is, "Will you get sick to the subject!" Recordis cried. You always go off on tangents!" "Very well," the king declared. "We will call the other ratio the tangent ratio." Overall it was pretty good book for people wanting to learn trigonometry in a fun way.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By J. S. Shin on August 31, 2001
Format: Paperback
I have read second edition of this book.I like the early chapters of this book. It's fun and easy to understand.
But there are some major errors and the book explains some concepts in a too much incomplete inductive way.
To begin with, the standing wave formula in the chapter 9 is different from the formula on many other college physics books.
This book says it Y=Asin(kx)sin(wt). But all other college physics books say it Y=Asin(kx)cos(wt).:-<
Another example, the answer to the exercise number 47 of the chapter 10 of this book, there is only one value for the x. Actually, there are two values. And if you seleted the same way with this book to solve this problem, you have to consider another value. Not just discard the extraneous root! Since the root value have to be interpreted to a value for the cosine as well as sine, because the quadratic equation formed exactly same with the case of cosine.
Additional example is the answer to the exercise number 57 of the chapter 10. The book omits two values. This error is very related with the concepts of chapter 12.
Furthermore, the book explains some concepts in a too much incomplete inductive way. An inductive way does not guarantee a theorem is true(well, the mathematical induction is an exception) . So it must used in a careful way. But this book abuse it. For example, see the exercise number 41 of the chapter 14. The book explains(actually make reader think by solving a problem) the existance of the polar triangle by just calculate a single instance of a spherical triangle. I think it must be presented by proving cosBcosC-sinBsinCcosa equals to -cosA by applying the law of cosines for sides and the fact sinBsinC becomes bc(1-(cosA)^2)/((sina)^2).Despite of the fact it may lead to a clumsy algebric experience.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Aaron Bergstrom on August 16, 2006
Format: Paperback
Ok, so I'm an archaeologist, just finished my masters degree in archaeology. However, I specialize in 3D visualization. My master's thesis was on 3D laser scanning of fossil casts. Anyway, I don't have a background in computer science or math, but because of this book I was able to pickup enough trig to write a 3D graphics program and finish my masters. I'm no rocket scientist, and I hate borring math books. So say what you want about this book's corny storyline, at least it's not a list of formulas and numbers. I recommend this book.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By James Cunningham on February 6, 2003
Format: Paperback
I purchased this book with the intent of teaching myself trigonometry - but after three chapters, I found I couldn't slog through the stupid fantasy story the book's structured around. I mean it, it's godawful, and renders the book entirely unreadable. I'm now going through Peter Selby's _Geometry and Trigonometry for Calculus_, which is far, far more palatable and straightforward.
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