Barry Lyndon 1975 PG CC

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(361) IMDb 8.1/10
Available in HD

The winner of four Academy Awards including Best Cinematography, Art Direction and Costume Design, "Barry Lyndon" features Ryan O'Neal as a rags-to-riches Irish gambler and hero-rogue.

Starring:
Ryan O'Neal, Marisa Berenson
Runtime:
3 hours 5 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Barry Lyndon

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Barry Lyndon

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Stanley Kubrick
Starring Ryan O'Neal, Marisa Berenson
Supporting actors Patrick Magee, Hardy Krüger, Steven Berkoff, Gay Hamilton, Marie Kean, Diana Körner, Murray Melvin, Frank Middlemass, André Morell, Arthur O'Sullivan, Godfrey Quigley, Leonard Rossiter, Philip Stone, Leon Vitali, John Bindon, Roger Booth, Billy Boyle, Jonathan Cecil
Studio Warner Bros.
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Kubrick was a master of film making.
Metalhead74
So much effort went into the making of this movie and for it to be ignored by audiences and hated by critics, one looks back at the film now and wonders, why?
Michael
This is one of the most well made films I have ever seen!
C HAGAN

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

96 of 104 people found the following review helpful By David Baldwin on August 7, 2004
Format: DVD
I am an unabashed Kubrick fan. I was initiated into his work with "A Clockwork Orange" when I was 16 and went from there. Why is it that "Barry Lyndon" has in my mind surpassed other more revered works. You can cite the magnificent technical attributes of the film(cinematography,art direction, costume design,music), however, a technically proficient movie is not necessarily a moving experience. I would have to say that what elevates this movie is the screenplay and the acting. Kubrick does a great job moving the story from Redmond Barry's youth to his downfall among the English aristocracy. Kubrick has also gathered a great cast of actors here in supporting roles(Parick Magee, Leonard Rossiter, Marie Kean, Godfrey Quigley, Steven Berkof, etc.). What cannot be overlooked is the performance of Ryan O'Neal. If some find him wooden or off-putting should consider that he is essentially playing an unsympathetic rogue. It is a daring performance and O'Neal is utterly convincing whether playing a headstrong teenager or a cold manipulator. One gripe about the DVDs in the Kubrick Collection: with the exception of "The Shining", the only extras on these discs are trailers.
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61 of 66 people found the following review helpful By Brian W. Fairbanks VINE VOICE on August 27, 2004
Format: DVD
Jack Warner is said to have once told an underling not to bring him any movies about people who write with feather pens. The mogul believed that costume epics were dull and plodding, guaranteed to test the patience of most audiences.

When Stanley Kubrick delivered his film "Barry Lyndon" to Warner Bros. in 1975, the studio's namesake was long gone, and that was probably for the best since he may have chosen not to release what is the ultimate feather pen movie and also Kubrick's greatest masterpiece. If asked to do the impossible and name the best film ever made, I wouldn't hesitate to give my vote to "Barry Lyndon."

Plodding? Yes. Dull? To those who demand rapid fire editing, it may be the dullest movie ever. For those who appreciate fine literature and fine art, "Barry Lyndon" is an absolute feast, visually, aurally, and dramatically. Based on an obscure novel by William Thackeray, it's the story of an Irish lad climbing the ranks of English society, alienating everyone in his path.

As Redmond Barry, Ryan O' Neal's Irish brogue comes and goes, but despite that inconsistency, he acquits himself well. Also worth noting is Michael Hordern's narrator, often seeming to express disapproval for the main character as he perceptively surveys his exploits.

The real star of the film is Kubrick and his production team who recreate the 17th century in a way that makes the viewer truly appreciate what life must have been like at the time. Watching the women, most notably the beautiful Marisa Berenson, sashaying about in glamourous dresses, one wonders how they could endure the apparent discomfort of such cumbersome clothing. It's no wonder they took so many baths.
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73 of 81 people found the following review helpful By M. Hickey on October 25, 2007
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
In 1975, one European reviewer wrote: "One collapses in one's seat and is propelled in a state of drunken euphoria." That's just how I felt about it, going back to experience "Barry Lyndon" over and over again at the Los Angeles Cinerama Dome theater in 1975-76. So I give the movie 5 stars. But for the standard 3x4 DVD (1:1.33 aspect ratio), only 3.
Having recently watched the 16x9 Hi-Def Blu-Ray discs of "Eyes Wide Shut" and "A Clockwork Orange" (after having watched the old standard DVDs a number of times), I can say that Hi-Def makes an important difference with Kubrick's movies -- not just because they are gorgeously photographed, but because the richness of the images conveys so much essential, visceral meaning that even a slightly degraded picture (i.e., standard DVD) actually impairs the work's emotional fullness, clarity and expressiveness. So much of "Barry Lyndon" consists of pure image and music, and so many of the images are meant to intoxicate, that the film needs to be seen in the best possible technical presentation.
Short of a new 35mm print, a 16x9 Blu-Ray disc displayed on a big 1080 set in the dark, uninterrupted, is the way to watch all of Kubrick, perhaps especially "Barry Lyndon." Now, finally, Warners Brothers Home Entertainment will release "Barry Lyndon" in Hi-Def on Blu-Ray disc on May 31, 2011. Yes, that means you have to buy it again, but if Warners' Hi-Def releases of their other Kubrick films are any indication, it will be worth it. With any luck, this Hi-Def release should accelerate the recent critical rehabilitation of this tragically under-appreciated masterpiece.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By tuberacer on March 19, 2005
Format: DVD
I am another who considers this film to be perhaps the finest cinematic feature ever produced. I have a few other contenders in my mind, but "Barry Lyndon" continues to grow more and more in my affection and incredulity. I have watched it, I don't know how many times. The DVD brings out it's sharpness, and I love going straight to my favorite scenes when I need an aesthetic pick-me-up. This is Kubrick at his prime, filmed after the scorching he received from the controversy over "Clockwork," and after the disappointment he suffered from realizing that his dream of "Napoleon" would not come to fruition [and oh, what a great loss to all of us it was that he never had the chance to make that movie! One can only imagine how Kubrick would have filled out the character of the Great Provocateur and how that movie would have informed history!]. In "Barry Lyndon," the chastened Kubrick comes roaring back from those two disappointments in all his strength and artistic genius--Kubrick the perfectionist doing the butterfly and backstroke in luscious irony. Yes it's long, yes it's slow--of course it is, it's as slow as the universe, and equally amazing. Every moment is fraught with the crispness of life moving forward and the irony of human ambition. I admit, when I first saw it in 1976 in 70mm at the theater, I was dismayed with it's seeming tediousness, but I was 18 then and I am nearing 50 now, and I think I've learned that the eye and the senses have to look and look and look again--and that's what the eye does with this movie, it looks with Kubrick, and listens with Kubrick, and delights with the master in the presence of his masterpiece.Read more ›
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