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66 of 69 people found the following review helpful
on November 17, 2010
This is probably the best stop leak out there. I had noxious coolant steam coming in the cab of my truck. This means a leak in the heater core - very expensive fix, around $800 as the whole dash has to come out. Fixed it right away. NOTE - negative reviews and damage are most likely caused by misuse. If you do not regularly flush your cooling system, you will have problems. If you already have lots of gunk, this will pile on it and cause problems. 1) Get your system flushed first!, 2) Run the engine for at least 45 min(they say 20) and not just at idle, drive it. You can buy a kit to flush it yourself for $20 + $10 for anti-freeze. Make sure to leave the heat on HOT as some cars have a valve that bypasses the heater core until you call for heat.
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19 of 24 people found the following review helpful
on December 13, 2012
**Update** I have since replaced my radiator, due to eventually having over heating issues again, perhaps the 100 degree heat here in FL doesn't help, I do know my water pump and thermostat were new and countless other things I replaced. It did begin to over heat again but I got a radiator for $70 on here and well, I'd say if you don't have the money to replace your radiator buy this and save up over the next couple of months until you can afford to do so, there are people who'll say this forever fix their over heating issue. I am not one of them. It absolutely DID stop my overheating issue altogether there for several months. Great product if you're in a bind. The only thing I can suggest is read the back, read it again and read it as you go, do not take any short cuts in using the product as advised.

Let me lay the ground work as to give an appropriate review.

My vehicle is a 1996 Jeep Cherokee Sport (4 liter 4x4) with 197,000 miles on it.

As I was driving this morning my Jeep over-heated after reviewing all the hoses and lines, I was stumped as to what was causing the overheating...then we discovered there was a leak, drip drip drip in the lower left hand corner of my radiator. A nice drip drip drip leak, not slow, yet not a steady downpour, closer to a steady drip however... I have used a Bars leak product for a slight oil leak many years again so I figured instead of $109-199 for a new radiator, why not take a shot with this product.

FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS, EXACTLY. I honestly believe too many people pour a little bit of this product in their radiator, or perhaps they don't follow the directs to a "T" and because of that a negative review is left. If you know you have a radiator leak for certain, take a chance with the $10 for this product as it 100% fixed my leak.

I let it idle for 15 minutes then drove it immediately for another 15 minutes plus, it recommends 15 minutes driving or idling. It can't hurt to let it run throughout the radiator longer.

I have moved the Jeep and it's parked in the driveway where not a single drop has dripped from the vehicle.

I rarely write reviews on things like this, but in a sense the best way to describe what this product does is similar to what a can of fix o flat does. It searches out the hole and plugs it. What a great option until you can afford to buy a new radiator, IF you want to.

Have a nice day.
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20 of 26 people found the following review helpful
Verified Purchase
Had a 2 different leaks in 2 different cars and it fixed both.
1998 Volvo S70 - Fixed a leak in the heater-core; no longer smell antifreeze when the heat is on.
2006 Ford Explorer - Fixed a Larger leak in the radiator, and its been going with no antifreeze drips for 3-4 Months now. $500 Save!

Anyways, I did read that someone fouled up their Radiator with this stuff.
THE TRICK is in the dosage.
1 bottle per 4 gallon cooling system.
Ford Explorer - 4 Gallon Cooling system = One Entire Bottle
Volvo S70 - 2 Gallon Cooling System = 1/2 Bottle (It would gum up too if I added the entire thing probably)
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on June 10, 2014
I have a 2008 BMW X5 with 3.0si engine that hasd 121,000 miles. The leak was somewhere on the corner of the drivers side of the radiator. I replaced the blue drain plus and the hose that runs from the bottom of the radiator to the the trasmission cooler with no result. I do not know where the leak was coming from as those the only pieces that could have been leaking other the the radiator itself. The winter of 2014 was the worst in Michigan history with more days under 20 degrees and more inches of snow ever recorded since 1884. I tried this product with some hesitation given the reviews. Yes, it had 5 stars, but is also had a few 1 starts too. If this did not work, my next step was going to be to replace the radiator at $400.00 for the cost of a new aluminium radiator plus my time taking the old one out and installing the new one not to mention replacing the radiator fluid at $30.00 a gallon on a BMW using Amsoil brand, which is 100% pure and cutting it in half via distilled water.

This product saved the day. $8.00 vs $450.00. I'll take that deal anyday!
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on August 5, 2014
Didn't buy this off here bought it at my local Wal-Mart. I had a crossover pipe leak in Subaru which is underneath the Intake manifold, which means the whole top end of the motor has to come off. Its a pretty common leak in older Subaru's like mine, I know people say it may clog your heater core. I have a 4 cylinder motor, on the back of the bottle it says to use half the bottle for 4 cylinders. I added a bit more than half the bottle, this stuff looks a lot different than most products that claim to stop leaks. Its like aluminum flakes in this gel, once you shake it well it mixes together quite well. I was losing a good amount of coolant, after a day of topping off my reservoir it would almost be half empty. So I decided instead of ripping off the top of my motor why not use this, I picked this because it didn't look like it would gunk up. There were other ones there, that looked like they would gunk up. I had to drain my rad a bit so it wouldn't overflow, I drained this and dumped a little more than half the bottle in. I Let it run for 15 minutes then took it for a 5 minute drive, the leak stopped automatically from the crossover pipe. Follow the directions to a "T" I'm not the only person writing a review on here that says this stuff has worked for them. Don't go crazy with it and start dumping bottles in and hoping it will seal up your leak, to much will probably start clogging things. Its not going to work for everyone, so don't take this review as its a 100% leak stopper. Its been almost 2 weeks no clogs anywhere, no overheating, and NO LEAKS! Couldn't be happier!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on September 19, 2014
Did not fix my leak. I ended up having to replace my radiator two weeks after using this product. While i don't know for sure that this caused my radiator to spring a giant leak on the top,it is defiantly a possibility according to my mechanic. I have learned that most radiators leaks are not due to a leak in the aluminum section of the radiator. So the chances of this liquid aluminum in a bottle solving your problem is slim. Most leaks are a result of the plastic on the radiator going bad or other simple obvious things like a bad cap on the radiator or reservoir tank or a lose hose. Spend a few bucks and go to a mechanic the when the problem begins. That might be more than the cost of this, but definitely less than replacing the entire radiator when it is just a bad hose or cap.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on December 21, 2014
I had a nasty radiator leak in my 2006 Chevy Aveo. I realized it was a problem when the car overheated due to empty coolant after having filled the coolant a few months prior. I added water on the side of the road to get me home and then filled it with coolant. By the end of that evening I had lost a quart. I could actually see the liquid running down the back of the radiator, see the "smoke" coming from under the hood when the car was hot, and smell the ethylene glycol from inside the car. (It smells like a fried capacitor for you electricians out there.) Since it was after normal mechanic hours and I had a full day of appointments the next day and didn't have $300 to spend on a new radiator, I read the reviews for this stuff and got some at the local auto parts store. I wasn't sure whether to get the "aluminum" or "copper" variety and the reviews, product descriptions, and labels weren't at all helpful in making the decision. In the end I just got the aluminum variety because of what it said about making flow easier.

I added half the bottle, directly into my antifreeze reservoir (contrary to instructions), topped off with coolant, and ran the engine for about 15-20 minutes (per instructions). I could tell that it had not sealed the leak, but it seemed to have slowed. The next day I drove the car normally and could tell that it was still leaking. I could still see and smell the steam coming out from under the hood. However by the end of the day that had stopped, and now, nearly two months later, it hasn't started again.

Tonight I went out to check the fluid levels and my reservoir was still almost full. However, there was a quarter-size disk of fibrous material floating in the reservoir which I fished out with a spoon. (See picture) It wasn't thick or heavy like cotton, and it pulled apart easily in my fingers. My guess is this stuff is what gradually plugs the leak as fluid leaks through the hole. It makes me nervous to have this stuff floating around in the system, but I haven't experienced any plugs. (The thermostat and heater both work great.)

I still plan on having the radiator replaced when I find the time and money, but this stuff was a life saver in my time of need. I only wish the label were more clear as to the mechanism, possible side effects, and the difference between the different flavors.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on October 24, 2014
I had a steady drip from the water pump on a 1994 Toyota Camry with 332,000 miles. The last time I replaced the water pump and timing belt it cost well over 500 bucks. No overheating now and the drip drip is totally gone! 5 stars out of 5!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on January 9, 2015
Verified Purchase
I have a 1991 GMC full size van and taking out a leaky heater core is a big job requiring removal of the dash. I tried some other sealers with no luck, so this was a last ditch attempt to avoid the heater core replacement. The heater core had a slow leak in it, blowing a little steam onto the windows when cold outside - nothing dripping on the interior floor. I doubt that any product would work if the leak is too big, but if you have a seep, this product may work.

After emptying the bottle into the radiator and driving around with the heater on for an hour, I didn't see any improvement. But after a few days, I noticed that things were improving. Far less steam was being produced. It took a week or so of operation to completely seal the leak. It seems that multiple heating/cooling cycles may help this product to seal. It's been about three weeks and all is good. Completely dry air and no steam. I'm not sure how long this will hold up, but so far I'm very impressed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on February 21, 2015
I had read many mixed reviews on this product , so I was naturally scared to put it in my cooling system. I had a 2000 Cadillac with a aluminum v8 North star engine. I had just installed new cooling fans , radiator, A/C condenser , I had also replaced the notorious Pain in the A$$ transmission tcc solenoid . When I removed the transmission side pan , I had to disconnect a water line that went to the back of the engine water crossover because , I needed the room for my hand . After I finished the job the line had a small drip every few seconds and would not seal no mater what I tried . It was on the back and in a almost impossible area to reach without major disassembly , and it was a push in line with a internal o ring you could not get to . So I poured about 1/4 bottle of the liquid aluminum in the coolant reservoir to see if it would seal the small drip leak. I then let the car idle for about 30 min with the heater on. Then got on the highway and drove for 45 min. I popped the hood and could not see any more drips.
It fixed my drip and did not clog anything up. So I have to say it worked good for me with no other problems created.
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