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Baseball Prospectus 2003 Paperback


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Product Details

  • Series: Baseball Prospectus
  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Potomac Books; 1 edition (February 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1574885618
  • ISBN-13: 978-1574885613
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 8.5 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,231,714 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"For how we view baseball players today, Baseball Prospectus is a breath of fresh air." -- J. P. Ricciardi, General Manager, Toronto Blue Jays

"The standard by which all scouting guides should be measured." -- —Billy Beane, General Manager, Oakland Athletics

About the Author

Joseph Sheehan, Chris Kahrl, and Clay Davenport are among the leaders in the discipline of sabermetrics - the analysis of baseball statistics.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 11 customer reviews
It's a gigantic book, and it's almost impossible to put down.
"rlockmed"
He still does - although Huckabay is listed only as the editor of this book, the writing reflects his style.
Jeffrey Lichtman
Ron Shandler's Baseball Forecaster is better reference for that.
Eugene Wei

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Eugene Wei on April 3, 2003
Format: Paperback
Baseball Prospectus was already the best annual publication on baseball for thinking baseball fans, and in 2003 it got better in several ways. First, in the past it only contained Clay Davenport's translated stats, but this year it includes both actual (or untranslated) stats and translated stats (batting avg, OBP, SLG, ERA). That's useful because you can compare the actual to translated stats to get a sense of where a player was helped or hurt by the competition and ballparks. Second, and perhaps most significantly, this version adds a new forecasting system from Nate Silver called PECOTA. This system compares a player to his most comparable historical peers in age, skills, and physical makeup and predicts the likelihood that his performance will improve, break out, or collapse. It's a unique predictive system that capitalizes on the fact that very few players are like a Barry Bonds, who overcome historical trends and forces to become statistical anomalies.
Some new contributors were brought on board this year to join an already excellent staff. Doug Pappas writes on the economic and labor situation of baseball better than anyone out there, and Will Carroll of the popular daily e-mail newsletter "Under the Knife" joins up to discuss player injuries. And lastly, the player coverage has increased this year to include even more minor league prospects.
Some of the book's best qualities remain. If you want a clear assessment of any team's current and future prospects and the quality of its management and farm system, absolutely read the introductions at the beginning of each team's chapter. They're brilliant. Secondly, the snippets on each player are as humorous as ever. The Baseball Prospectus writers enjoy flashing their wit.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By "rlockmed" on February 14, 2003
Format: Paperback
It's even better than it used to be. In addition to park adjusted statistics, there's raw, unadjusted stats for all the major and minor league players, which is great because Stats is no longer making the Red and Green Books. The graphic presentation of the statistics is better, too, with the adjusted stats clearly marked from the raw stats.
The writing is outstanding, and the separate essays on injuries and the forecasting system are really good. It's a gigantic book, and it's almost impossible to put down. I love it.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By CGC on April 24, 2003
Format: Paperback
BASEBALL PROSPECTUS is one of the best sabermeticians' baseball resources out there, and thanks to witty, perceptive player commentaries, very accessible to the less numerically inclined. This should not be considered a resource for fantasy baseball players, but is useful for them as well.
In 2002, PROSPECTUS carried only "translated" player statistics--actual numbers adjusted for park and league effects. The theory is that without taking context into account, it is impossible to measure the value of players relative to one another.
The theory is solid, obviously, but the 2003 edition carries both the actual and the translated statistics, which makes it a much more useful all-in-one resource. You no longer have to go flipping through another book to find what a player actually did.
The player write-ups continue in the humorous but incisive PROSPECTUS tradition, though the humor seems to be a bit less sharp this year. It seems they've decided to be a little more serious and straightforward.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Edwards on February 27, 2003
Format: Paperback
Not a pocket book by any means, this year's Prospectus reaches deeply into each system, covering not just players on each team's 40-man roster, but rookie ball players and players who might be missed otherwise. As an example, the Angels section covered 53 players, with a paragraph written about each, and statistics covering each player's last three seasons. Minor league statistics are translated into major league numbers, and Nate Silver's PECOTA system is used to make 2003 projections, including probability of improvement, collapse, or a breakout season. The PECOTA system is explained in an essay at the end of the book, and it's more detailed than most projections I've seen, and a lot of thought has gone into it.
However, the casual fan can still enjoy the book, in contrast to a lot of stat books found on the market. The book and its description of players doesn't take itself totally seriously, while keeping statheads happy with as much information as they can get. There are large articles on each team, going into detail how the teams got to where they are, and what to expect in the future. In addition, articles and essays on injuries, the new combined bargaining agreement, and a look at the book's top 40 prospects makes the Baseball Prospectus something you'll cling to for your fantasy draft, and keep going back to throughout the entire season.
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Format: Paperback
Whether you want the advantage in winning a fantasy baseball league or simply want to sound intelligent when discussing the sport of baseball, this book provides unbelievably in-depth analysis found no where else, and does so in an often humorous way.
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Format: Paperback
I first encountered Gary Huckabay years ago on the internet before most people knew what the internet was. I made a point of reading his postings because he always had something interesting to say. He still does - although Huckabay is listed only as the editor of this book, the writing reflects his style.
There are a lot of stats books but this is one of the few that has good commentary to go along with the numbers. It's not just a reference book - it's fun to read. It's especially valuable now that Stats, Inc. has been taken over and homogenized by The Sporting News.
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