Customer Reviews


39 Reviews
5 star:
 (10)
4 star:
 (15)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (9)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Key Points
I notice that most of the reviews for Moore's THE BASIC PRACTICE OF STATISTICS have been written by students. I found these reviews insightful to read. My students (like the ones who composed the reviews) are not math majors and do NOT want to enroll in a statistics course.

Being sensitive to that fact, I spent a great deal of time selecting a statistic text...
Published on August 1, 2008 by S. M Marson

versus
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Wrong answers, Wrong book
I bought this book because it was required textbook. But if I had a choice of selecting my own textbook, this wouldn't be it. Some of the answers on the back were wrong (after few times, you can't trust the answers or yourself any more), un-updated with newer version, and too short answers to figure out what is the explanation of the outcomes. So I turned to the CDs which...
Published on January 29, 2005 by angry statistic student


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Key Points, August 1, 2008
By 
I notice that most of the reviews for Moore's THE BASIC PRACTICE OF STATISTICS have been written by students. I found these reviews insightful to read. My students (like the ones who composed the reviews) are not math majors and do NOT want to enroll in a statistics course.

Being sensitive to that fact, I spent a great deal of time selecting a statistic text. I had several concerns which directed me toward adopting Moore's text:

1. Oftentimes, one can find typos in textbooks. This isn't a major problem, but if there is a typo in a formula, the problems for students are enormous! If the professor is from the math or statistics department, he/she can quickly catch the error and explain it to the students. If the professor is from the social sciences, he/she is less likely to catch the error. I've actually found errors in statistics textbooks. These critical errors usually can be found in books which are written by social scientists (someone like me). Thus, I've concluded that stat books written by statisticians are less apt to have typos than stat books written by social scientists. Moore is a statistician with a considerable reputation.

2. I needed a book with excellent graphic illustrations. A good graphic will help a student understand a complex statistical concept better than the written word. Moore's text is filled with great graphics that explain complex concepts. Page 347 is a great example and has produced an epiphany for several students.

3. I needed an introductory book that included information on control charts. Moore offers this. Frankly, I haven't found another intro stat book that does this.

I've reviewed a large number of statistic textbooks. In my estimation, Moore offers the best book for non math majors.

For more reading about the use of THE BASIC PRACTICE OF STATISTICS, check out volume 27 issues 3-4, 2007, pages 199-213 of THE JOURNAL OF TEACHING IN SOCIAL WORK.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Wrong answers, Wrong book, January 29, 2005
I bought this book because it was required textbook. But if I had a choice of selecting my own textbook, this wouldn't be it. Some of the answers on the back were wrong (after few times, you can't trust the answers or yourself any more), un-updated with newer version, and too short answers to figure out what is the explanation of the outcomes. So I turned to the CDs which came with the book, only to find that the website links are all messed up and needed an instructor's registered email to access any important stuff. --simply useless.

I am usually not very active about giving advice but in this case I had to speak out--Don't buy. I have another advise for you if you are the publisher: revise. third edition doesn't seem to be any better than 2nd.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It's a very good intro book, December 23, 2005
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I found this book to be an excellent review/refresher of or introduction to statistics and experimental design. I took my first statistics course in medical school in the 1970's when statistics was all about math, proofs, etc. Fact of the matter is that most people who actually use elementary statistics do not have near enough math background to understand any but the simplest of proofs. Thus, I was happy to see a book on statistics that actually focuses on what is more important: the understanding of experimental design and an elementary understanding of the statistics which are useful, depending on the experimental design.

I would highly recommend this book as probably the best elementary statistics book I've read. I am a physician who has recently begun a serious clinical research program and although we have "real" statisticians, I need to know more myself. This book is a very, very nice introduction.

For more detailed inquiry, the SPSS series of books are excellent.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Finally!, November 9, 2008
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
It's difficult to write a glowing review for a statistics textbook. Even if it's an excellent book, deserving of five stars, it's treating a subject the study of which, for most people, ranks right up there between watching paint dry and getting warts removed.

I've used several statistics textbooks in teaching, tutoring and studying stats. Some of them had great illustrations, and some had a cool CD in the back. Most had instructions for using a TI calc, Excel or Minitab to solve problems. Some tried to push a sociopolitical agenda through careful selection of examples and problems. But until this book, none of them did a decent job of explaining, in plain language, what all the "things" in statistics really meant.

Finally we have a textbook that explains to the student studying statistics for the first time, what the "standard deviation of the mean" (to choose a random example) really means, and why he/she should care. Other books may try, but their language is still up there in Math Land. This book gets it right.

This book also has the great illustrations, the cool CD in back, the TI/Excel/Minitab instructions. It also has the sociopolitical agenda, as evidenced in the authors' choices for examples and problems. In a clever bit of self-parody, the book warns repeatedly about how easy it is to promote a sociopolitical agenda through the judicious use of statistics.

The authors announce at the beginning of the book that it will not include any "how-to" algorithms or practice for calculating basic statistics by hand, since everyone has access to tools that do the hard work for you. That's a disappointment. Every student of statistics ought to calculate a standard deviation by hand once in their life, just so they know how it's done.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Anything But Basic, October 6, 2005
While I could write a book longer than the actual book, describing every illogical teaching attempt, a very fundamental one can be found on page 82, in which it introduces the scatter plot graph to the reader.

Rather than putting a nice big X and Y on the graph, the reader must wait until the next page, where these basic components are discussed halfway through a paragraph (not in bold either- that would make too much sense). Furthermore, the picture of the scatter plot graph should indicate that X is the explanatory variable and Y is the response variable (also buried in the text).

It reminds me of a joke in a web design course, of how not to design a website, showing the prices and info for washing machines buried in a paragraph, while the pictures of the machines sit off to the other side of the screen with no info whatsoever about which one is which.

The most tiresome aspect of the book, is how the author jumps around so much it's as if he's aiming to confuse just to inflate his elitist ego. I'm a recording musician myself, and I could write a book about studio recording that would make his head spin, and he'd most certainly fail my class; if I took the passive aggressive educational approach he does.

The two other 1-star reviews here are excellent, and I commend the authors for voicing their honesty (the publishing house must've written the positive ones).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A jumble of deviations, April 14, 2005
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This book was poorly planned. To a student learning statistics, this book can be very confusing. Contrary to traditional textbooks with a review problems section at the end of each chapter, the problems in this book are intermingled throughout the chapter! Therefore meat of this book - explanations of concepts - gets disbursed over many pages. This makes it difficult to outline the important concepts for reviewing. Margins and empty spaces are cluttered with irrelevant photography and trivia, making it difficult to concentrate. Another annoyance is that the author stuffs "cursory information" that doesn't apply until later chapters. A person trying to grasp the main points is suddenly confronted with an incomplete and unfinished idea followed by a tiny footnote saying "you can skip this page until Chapter 22." It would be a great help if the author included more graphs and pictorial representations so that the reader can visualize the concepts. If this book is required for a class, you should get the most from the professor's lecture or else you're in serious trouble!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I wanted to like this book, I really did, December 13, 2008
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
. . .but it misses the mark by having too many flaws. As far as textbooks are concerned, it tries to do a good job making statistics assessable to those who do not yet grasp the subject but it fails to do so for a variety of reasons. Unfortunately, many of the concepts are not presented clearly and often assumes that the student has completely mastered them before moving on. This is particularly evident as the book progresses and one needs to hunt for topics that were presented one hundred pages (or more) previously and have not been discussed since.

It is necessary to continuously jump around to previous pages in order to find materials being referenced and new examples do not contain all of the information need to solve them. While the solutions to many practice problems are found at the back of the book, they are not explained adequately making it almost impossible to determine how to reach the correct solution.

While this text is on the right track (disregarding the author's personal biases regarding his non-statistical political agendas), it is incomplete and leads to many additional (and needless) hours to work through. For those who have not had a statistics course, this can cause a lot of grief. I ended up purchasing several other books in order to gain an understanding of what the author did not explain effectively. For me, this was compounded by the fact that our class devoured this book in a mere ten weeks - far too much information (especially when that information is not presented sufficiently) to glean in such a short period of time.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A Difficult Subject Made More Difficult, December 19, 2005
I just completed a statistics class and unfortunately, this book was required for the course. I was very disappointed in this book. It was poorly written and only served to make statistics more confusing, more difficult. Initially, I thought it was me just not getting it, but after starting a study group, several of my classmates commented that they never read the homework chapters because they were so confusing. They primarily studied from the teacher's in class discussion and notes. Even my statistic's tutor told me that it was a terrible book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Read The other 1 star reviews, September 2, 2006
This book is a disorganized, sloppy and ridiculous attempt to explain statistics in layman's terms.

I bought the study guide (much better) and have come to this conclusion. Most textbook writers should write a textbook then take out the exercises put them in the study guide and throw away the manuscript forever as not to add to the loathing that people have of mathematics.

Luckily, my instructor does not require that we turn in homework I simply do the exercises from the study guide skip reading the book and save my self a lot of time.

This means I practice the same problems over and over (a lot more effective than it sounds) and pass the tests easily since there is not really too much to this book other than a few formulas and definitions.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Book, December 18, 2004
This is a really good book for the introduction to Statistics. The accompanying CD is very good. IT contains lots of data from the problems in the book so you don't have to key in. My instructor also gave us a lot of homework assignments to be done with Minitab. The CD comes with a free student version of SPSS. You may have to buy Minitab if you intent on using it. But do use its very intutive and powerful. The book also encourages the use of Excel, Minitab and TI 83. I used Voyage 200 and it was very helpful for this course. The comanion website is awesome it contains every thing thats on your CD plus additional applets, quizes to help reinforce the material.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

The Basic Practice of Statistics (Paper) & Student CD
The Basic Practice of Statistics (Paper) & Student CD by David S. Moore (Paperback - August 4, 2006)
$128.06
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.