Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Basil's Search For Miracles Paperback – March 30, 2007


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.36 $0.20


Editorial Reviews

Review

"Basil's Search for Miracles is truly a page-turner. Heather Zydek has done a remarkable job of exploring complex relationships and at the same time introducing Orthodox Christianity to readers who may have had little or no contact with any church. The kids in her story emerge as very real young people. The issue of parental abuse is brought into the narrative effectively and in a challenging way." ----Jim Forest, author of Praying with Icons

"Basil's Search for Miracles is an engaging, well-paced and richly-textured story. Mrs. Zydek's treatment of the miraculous is sensitive and rings true for the Orthodox context. I would heartily recommend Basil's Search to any young person who is struggling to make sense of life and wants to better understand weeping icons, relics and healing. Ultimately, this book is not just about the supernatural--it also speaks to the gift of compassion and how it can transform us from within and bring healing to the broken lives around us." --Jenny Schroedel, author of The Blackbird's Nest: Saint Kevin of Ireland

"Basil's Search for Miracles is a wonderful story, weaving religious mystery and understated suspense into a classic coming-of-age drama. I couldn't put it down." --Jason Boyett, author of Pocket Guide to the Bible, Pocket Guide to the Apocalypse, and A Guy s Guide to Life: How to Become a Man in 208 Pages or Less

About the Author

Heather Zydek is a writer, editor and musician who lives in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin with her husband and three daughters. She serves as editor of RelevantMagazine.com's "Revolution" web page and is the editor of The Revolution: A field manual for changing your world and The Relevant Nation: 50 Activists, Artists and Innovators who are changing their world with faith.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Conciliar Press; 1st edition (March 30, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1888212861
  • ISBN-13: 978-1888212860
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,310,270 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Heather Zydek (1976 - ) was born and raised in the Chicago suburbs. Much of her writing explores themes of suburban angst, ancient Christian mysticism, and justice for the oppressed. She lives with her family in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
8
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
2
See all 11 customer reviews
And we eagerly anticipate the next book...
Kids And Cultures
I was quite surprised by the depth in this little book - how my heart aches for one of the characters!
JA
The best young adult books appeal to readers of all ages and this is one of those books.
Anita Ashland

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By T Brecht on June 2, 2007
Format: Paperback
Heather Zydek, an Orthodox Christian, is a free lance journalist and

writer of fiction for young people. Her books are written with an effort

to instill Godly thoughts in her young readers, while at the same time

giving her young readers an Orthodox Christian perspective on the all too

often controversial and confusing current issues facing young people

today. _Basil's Search for Miracles_ seamlessly weaves into the plot of

her story the problems of fitting in and judging others that all

adolescents struggle with along their road to adulthood.

When twelve year old Basil moves to a new Christian, private school, he is

faced with the struggle of fitting in with a new group of classmates. He

is given a spot as a reporter on the school's monthly newspaper and the

assignment to write about miracles. Through this assignment he meets an

elderly Orthodox priest who tells him stories of modern and ancient

miracles and explains to him the basic tenets of Orthodoxy. Through

Basil's search for miracles for his school's newspaper, he discovers the

richness and fullness of Orthodoxy and comes to have a deeper respect and

understanding of it and how it applies to his modern, daily life.

This short book also smoothly follows his process of discovering the

strengths and weaknesses of his new classmates and his reasons for

befriending some and not others. Through his interactions with the other

student newspaper staff members he learns how to make friends and be a

friend while at the same time being true to himself.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Anita Ashland on May 3, 2007
Format: Paperback
The best young adult books appeal to readers of all ages and this is one of those books. The only young adult books that don't have a soporofic effect on me are Harry Potter books so I was pleasantly surprised to find myself staying up late at night finishing this book.

This book has the elements that any good novel must have: plenty of dialogue, adventure, conflict. The priest and the monk are characters that one wouldn't mind meeting in person. The children are believable characters who converse with each other and get on each other's nerves in the ways that children usually do. The story weaves in child abuse and divorce without being overly graphic.

A book of a religious nature such as this can tend to be too preachy and too laden with treacle. You won't find that here and can feel free to hand this book to the nearest 12-year-old.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. Mutton on April 23, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What I especially like about this book is that the hero, Basil, leads a life so very similar to that of so many contemporary kids -- the ones who fall through the cracks, the ones whom no one thinks about until they get so distressed at the torment others subject them to, that they start offing their fellow students. Basil, in short, is a "brainiac." He's not good in sports, but he loves to write, and there are more of those kids in our world than people seem to want to acknowledge. Fortunately for him, though he obviously doesn't think so initially, he has a mom who cares enough about him and his gifts to send him to a school that promotes talents of all sorts. Like so many kids nowadays, he doesn't come from an "intact home." He doesn't come from a particularly religious background, which gives his experience all the more of a punch. Ms. Zydek's book brings him and his fellow St. Norbert's pupils to life in a very three-dimensional way that leaves me feeling as if, "I've met this kid."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 14 people found the following review helpful By SCordery on September 10, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is a book for teenagers, not younger kids. It concerns Basil, who befriends the student in class to whom no one will speak--and we find out in much too graphic detail that this student's father has killed his mother and beats him, leaving scars and wounds which are seen in the locker room. The boy stays with his alcoholic, abusive father because he believes his father to be ill, and maintains that prayer will heal him and make the beatings stop.

Meanwhile, in search of stories about miracles, budding journalist Basil repeatedly disobeys his mother, with no consequences. The priest who takes an interest in him is just as ineffectual as Basil's teacher. Neither man offers to help Basil make sense of his world (nor figure out his mother or his friend). Neither man reinforces Basil's mother's rules. Basil's mother is an unsympathetic character who has a sort of awakening about her son at the end of the book--but Basil never takes responsiblity for his sneaking around behind her back and she never owns her own poor parenting. There are no healthy role models for kids in this book at all.

The author never explains Orthodoxy. We had hoped that we could use this book to speak with our son about different faith traditions--but we learned much more about murder, alcoholism, and a father's abuse than we did about the rich traditions of the Greek Orthodox Church. It's as though the priests and the icons and the healings happen in a vacuum.

There is no final conversion for Basil; no embracing of the church or of God. His battered friend escapes to a monastery where his uncle is living, but there is no resolution of his fate, either.

The book is not preachy--there's no "God talk" at all.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?