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The Bastards (Les Batards)


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The Bastards (Les Batards) + Sangre [Import NTSC Region 1 and 4] Amat Escalante
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Product Details

  • Actors: Jesus Moises Rodriguez, Ruben Sosa
  • Directors: Amat Escalante
  • Producers: Jaime Romandia
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, Dubbed, Letterboxed, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: Spanish
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Dubbed: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: KINO INTERNATIONAL
  • DVD Release Date: June 30, 2009
  • Run Time: 90 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001W5U2BO
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #171,757 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

OFFICIAL SELECTION: CANNES - ROTTERDAM - BERLIN

A multiple award winner and 2008 Cannes Film Festival selection, Amat Escalante s Los Bastardos (looks and sounds very impressive - Variety), and makes an indelibly disturbing impact. Like the rest of the day-laboring migrant workers who gather together each morning on a southwestern American strip mall sidewalk, Jesus (Jesus Moises Rodriguez) and Fausto (Ruben Sosa) struggle to get ahead in El Norte. But when a callous gringo boss strands them in the middle of a community that exploits them one minute and insults them the next, the two young men cock their sawed off shotgun and calmly take a troubled housewife hostage in her own home. Why are you doing this?, asks Karen (Nina Zavarin), a strung-out and paranoid divorcee with little left to lose. Por la dinero, replies Jesus. Before Los Bastardos reaches its shockingly violent climax, Jesus, Fausto, and Karen will have mapped out a contemporary North American wasteland of affectless, benumbed amorality far surpassing mere greed. Co-produced by Carlos Reygadas (Silent Light, Battle in Heaven), Los Bastardos plumbs the depths of human brutality with the same cool cinematic certitude as the work of Michael Haneke and Bruno Dumont.

Special Features:

- Los Bastardos: Behind The Scenes (28 min, with English Subtitles)
- Theatrical Trailer
- Stills Gallery

2008 Mexico/France/USA - In English and Spanish with Optional English & Spanish Subtitles - Letterboxed (2.35:1) Enhanced for 16x9 TVs

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A. J. Cox on March 5, 2010
Amat Escalante's 'Los Bastardos' (2008), which I had the pleasure of seeing at the Tate Modern in December 2009, fits into the existential `buddy narrative' of films/plays like `Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead' and Samuel Beckett's `Waiting for Godot'. The long opening shot is of a desolate urban landscape on the outskirts of Los Angeles, and shows two wandering figures in the far background. Escalante sets the scene for the film and introduces us to the broader social predicaments of the characters, who are illegal Mexican labourers in the United States.

'Los Bastardos' opens slowly and the two main protagonists, Jesus and Fausto, don't come to the fore till at least halfway into the film. They have been contracted to kill an American woman. The woman's life is portrayed as rather drab. She lives with an uncommunicative and awkward adolescent son, with whom she can barely hold a conversation, and she seeks solace through drug use. When Jesus and Fausto break into the woman's home is where the narrative begins to unfold. `Los Bastardos' is very similar, stylistically, to the German director, Michael Haneke's `Funny Games' (1989) - Jesus demands food from the woman and she is constantly watched over with a shotgun. Whilst Haneke's film is very much a modern, dystopian fairy tale with the nice middle class family being tortured and imprisoned by two sadistic sociopaths from no particular place, Escalante portrays believable characters in Jesus and Fausto. Jesus and Fausto are not `natural' friends - Jesus is in his 30s, while Fausto is an awkward and reticent teenager.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Frank on June 24, 2009
El Norte meets Pulp Fiction (sort of, but that's a simplification). Caught this little gem at the LA Film Festival today. On a shoe-string budget, director Amat Escalante and his co-writer brother Martin create a tension-filled piece that melds genres and offers it's share of shocks. Undocumented immigrant dayworkers take a very wrong turn on the road to their American dream with harrowing results for all concerned. Brave performance by Nina Zavarin as a disaffected divorced/separated mom whose numbed life may suddenly be derailed by her encounter with the two other protagonists. Escalante has flair for visual composition both indoors and out in the Southern California urbanscapes where this tale unfolds. Recommended.
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The Bastards (Les Batards)
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