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Batman: Life After Death (Batman (DC Comics Hardcover)) Hardcover – October 19, 2010


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Product Details

  • Series: Batman (DC Comics Hardcover)
  • Hardcover: 200 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics (October 19, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401228348
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401228347
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 0.6 x 10.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #545,780 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

A man takes cautious first steps into the heroic role once held by his mentor in a story that hits all the expected notes of the superhero genre but doesn't do anything to impress. Daniel, known mainly for his skills as an artist, also takes on the writer's role for this story of Dick Grayson stepping into Batman's boots following the disappearance and presumed death of Bruce Wayne. Grayson must prove himself as skillful a detective as his predecessor while instigating a resurgence of a Black Mask-led criminal gang that's using mind-altering technology to recruit innocent civilians to commit violent crimes. In dealing with Bruce Wayne's former allies and enemies, Dick begins to prove that he is capable of being Batman but will do so in his own style. Daniel's writing is not nearly as strong as his artistic ability, and he often stumbles over a disjointed collection of subplots that pop in and out of the main story. While this is a noteworthy step in the history of a beloved fictional character's cast, it's not an otherwise memorable tale. (Oct.)
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Tony Daniel is the regular penciller of Teen Titans; he has also drawn Superman, X-Force and more. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

Tony Daniel is a good artist and he shows himself to be a good writer as well.
woodrow locksley
There were too many times reading it where I thought to myself "Wait, what's going on again?" and then flicking back to figure out it's something very straightforward.
Sam Quixote
My only complaint is that character development is a little on the lacking side, that this story feels a little rushed.
Dillon Johnstone

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By woodrow locksley on November 18, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Tony Daniel is a good artist and he shows himself to be a good writer as well.I cant say I was surprised by who Black Mask was but he writes and handles the character of Dick Grayson better than most writers have done who tend to make him too whiny or too weak of a fighter and he does action well and did some other stuff like the Selina-Dick relationship with some skill. The fact he is a good artist helps. The main problem with the volume is the two part throw on story at the end which gets only 3 stars from me too much cornball magis for Batman and mediocore art.I would give this volume 3anda half stars but with no half star ratings I give the volume the rating of the larger story which is 4
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Format: Hardcover
Title: Batman: Life After Death (HC)
Publisher: DC
Writer: Tony Daniel
Artists: Tony Daniel, Guillem March, Sandu Florea, Norm Rapmund (pencils, inks) Ian Hannin, Tomeu Morey (colors), Tony Daniel (covers)
Collects: Batman #692-699
Price: $19.99

This book was a difficult read for me. Why? Because I was confused about all the many things that the author was trying to say and show. The book was actually a bit of a chore to read through, and that's never a good thing for media that's supposed to be entertaining. So what went wrong, here? It's difficult to put my finger on.

At its core (and as it states on the book's dust jacket), the book is about a war between the criminal lords of Gotham City. All sides are taking casualties, though a few seem to be rising to the top. Maybe there are just too many players on the board? We've got the Falcone family, a new Black Mask, Penguin, a [somewhat] reformed Edward Nigma, a resurrected Reaper, a new Catgirl, Catwoman, Batman and Robin (of course), Fright, and appearances by Batman's friends and allies - Oracle and Huntress. While it's uncommon for a comic book to have too many characters, this seems to be part of the problem with this book. The mystery isn't mysterious because you get confused with all of the new characters. It just wasn't fun like it should have been. And that's just the first story arc - Life after Death.

There's a second story arc in this book, as well. The second storyline introduces a new character named Blackspell. The story is centered on The Riddler, though it ties in to other well-known Arkham Asylum inmates such as Firefly. Again, the story-telling is a bit murky, and I can't say I enjoyed the story, as a whole.

At on the book is a mixed bag.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dillon Johnstone on February 11, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Dick has taken up his mantle, he has proven himself more than deserving after a long and troublesome journey internally and externally.

It's honestly hard to believe, at first thought, that anyone could effectively be Batman better than Bruce. Tony Daniel has proven otherwise. My only complaint is that character development is a little on the lacking side, that this story feels a little rushed. But I'm sure most would understand that getting used to a new pair of wings isn't going to come out perfect.
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By Sam Quixote on December 28, 2011
Format: Paperback
This is my third Tony Daniel/Batman book and I'm starting to realise that he's not the Batman writer I hoped he'd be. He's a fine artist and the artwork here is as good as the best artwork there's ever been in Batman, but as a writer I don't think he's up there, that he's more average than excellent.

Bruce Wayne's dead (or travelling through time as it turns out) so following the events of "Battle for the Cowl" (also by Daniel), Dick Grayson has assumed the cowl and become the Batman for Gotham. A new Black Mask is causing chaos in the part of Gotham known as the aptly named Devil's Square and another Falcone family member is making a return to try and set up shop once again.

There just isn't anything new here to make the story fresh or interesting - another Black Mask, another Falcone, more appearances by ridiculously cartoonish villains like the Reaper (complete with robe and scythe) and a vaudevillian magician (really), and an overly convoluted and drawn out plot that didn't contain many surprises.

I like Grayson as Batman but besides a few moments where his inexperience was highlighted and his difficulty adjusting to the role as socialite, there wasn't enough here that was new. In the end, he makes a good Batman and aside from his nearest and dearest knowing it isn't Bruce, it's still basically the Batman doing his thing.

I liked the artwork like I always do in Daniel's books but the storylines need to be sharper. There were too many times reading it where I thought to myself "Wait, what's going on again?" and then flicking back to figure out it's something very straightforward. Daniel just uses too many ingredients to tell a story which makes for an overly confusing read. "Life After Death" is no great shakes as a Batman story and isn't necessary to get the overall arch, it's just for fans who need filler while better Batman books are produced.
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By LoveMachine on August 24, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I'm not really a fan of mainstream stories, with them often being weighed down by the magnitude of their own continuity. "Life After Death" is one of those stories, but with the sheer force of will rivaling Dick Grayson's turn as the Dark Knight, it succeeds in carrying on the mythology.

In case you haven't heard: Bruce Wayne has been MIA due to the events of Final Crisis (it's really complicated) and Dick Grayson (formerly known as Nightwing and the first Robin) dons the cape and the cowl. And the timing couldn't be any more perfect. A new wave of violence threatens to overtake Gotham City, spearheaded by a new Black Mask, the returning Falcone family, and several of Batman's traditional gallery that, thankfully, don't include the much overused Joker and Two-Face.

First, the good: Dick Grayson is written superbly as the new savior of Gotham. There's no time wasted on "What Would Bruce Do?" moments and we get to see Dick to the full extent of his character. The unlikely allies that he enlists in his venture, Damian Wayne, Huntress, Catwoman, and even Hush all are written realistically into the story. Some of their dialog can be iffy at times, but the artwork detailing their characters is truly amazing - it is the true star of the show, hands down. In recent memory, I've never seen Batman's cape flow so smoothly, or having characters this detailed! Tony S. Daniel truly pulled out all the stops to display some real eye candy for the reader.

Now, the bad: Very little of this is new. The city under siege concept has been down to death by now (one might ponder the real estate values in Gotham due to constant threat of annihilation), and the whole "mystery" surrounding the new Black Mask falls flat.
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