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Batman - The Dark Knight Vol. 4: Clay (The New 52) Paperback – February 17, 2015


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Batman - The Dark Knight Vol. 4: Clay (The New 52) + Batman - The Dark Knight Vol. 3: Mad (The New 52) + Batman: The Dark Knight Vol. 2: Cycle of Violence (The New 52) (Batman: The Dark Knight (DC Comics))
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"This is your go-to book."—Entertainment Weekly

"Detective Comics is head-spinningly spectacular from top to bottom."—MTV Geek

"The start to something truly great."—IGN

"A perfect transition into the medium."—Complex Magazine

About the Author

Gregg Hurwitz is the New York Times bestselling author of 12 thrillers, most recently, The Survivor (8/12). His novels have been shortlisted for numerous literary awards, graced top ten lists, and have been translated into 22 languages. He has also written comics for Marvel (Wolverine, Punisher) and DC (Batman, Penguin) and produced and written screenplays for film and television (ABC's "V", "Expulsion" spec script to Warner Bros, and many more). He recently announced that he will be developing his Tim Rackley books for TNT/Sony. Gregg resides in Los Angeles.
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Product Details

  • Series: Batman
  • Paperback: 1765 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics; 52nd edition edition (February 17, 2015)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401249302
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401249304
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 0.3 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #78,964 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Gregg Hurwitz is the critically acclaimed, New York Times and internationally bestselling author of fourteen novels, most recently Don't Look Back, You're Next, The Survivor and Tell No Lies. His books have been nominated for numerous awards, shortlisted twice for best novel of the year by International Thriller Writers, nominated for CWA's Ian Fleming Steel Dagger, chosen as feature selections for all four major literary book clubs, honored as Book Sense Picks, nominated for the Galaxy National Book Award, and translated into twenty two languages.
Gregg has written screenplays for or sold spec scripts to many of the major studios, and written, developed, and produced television for various networks. He is also a New York Times Bestselling comic book writer, having penned stories for Marvel (Wolverine, Punisher) and DC (Batman, Penguin). He has published numerous academic articles on Shakespeare, taught fiction writing in the USC English Department, and guest lectured for UCLA, and for Harvard in the United States and internationally. In the course of researching his thrillers, he has sneaked onto demolition ranges with Navy SEALs, swum with sharks in the Galápagos, and gone undercover into mind-control cults.
Hurwitz grew up in the Bay Area. While completing a BA from Harvard and a master's from Trinity College, Oxford in Shakespearean tragedy, he wrote his first novel. He was the undergraduate scholar-athlete of the year at Harvard for his pole-vaulting exploits, and played college soccer in England, where he was a Knox fellow. He now lives in L.A. where he continues to play soccer, frequently injuring himself.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Gregg Satula on September 7, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I picked up Batman again with the New 52. Before that, it had been back to when Bane broke his back in #500. I started with Snyder's Court of Owls story, then continued with Death of The Family. I've picked up other books in the Batman line since, such as Catwoman, Talon, Nightwing, and some others. Following Death of The Family, I decided to try Dark Knight.

The opening chapters were very good. The writing by Hurwitz was mostly good, but pales to Snyder's abilities. The art for the first several chapters is by Maleev. Its dark and gritty, which matches the feel of the book.

The first story gives Clayface's origin and does a good job characterizing him. He's ends up having a tie to another major villain that I was not aware of in the original continuity.

Ponticelli does the art for the next chapters. The art is similar to Maleev's, but more shadows and less lines. The story is wordless, which was interesting in its own right. It's a touching story done well. They only other wordless story that I've enjoyed recently is from Fraction's recent Hawkeye, but there's a different reason why there isn't any words.

The final arch features a new Man-Bat. At first the story was ok, but the final resolution was so incredibly terrible it almost ruined the whole book. It is just ridiculous to say the least. I hope it was just a poor choice that isn't repeated in future issues. Also the art by Van Sciver was drastically different than the rest of the book. Too many colors, weird facial expressions, and way too many wrinkle lines.

I may pick up Vol. 5, but for now I'm enjoying the other titles, with exception of Catwoman, which has tanked since Vol. 2.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sam Quixote TOP 1000 REVIEWER on March 26, 2015
Format: Kindle Edition
The Dark Knight series has been Gregg Hurwitz’s vehicle for showcasing Batman’s rogues gallery from Scarecrow to The Mad Hatter with varying results - the Scarecrow book, Cycle of Violence, was silly but The Mad Hatter book was unexpectedly brilliant. This fourth volume focuses on Clayface aka Basil Karlo, though unfortunately it’s not very good.

If you’ve read one Clayface story, you’ve read them all. He used to be an actor, now he’s a poo monster cosplayer who shape-shifts and robs jewellery stores. Usually in these stories there’s a familiar character like Gordon or Alfred acting strangely before it’s revealed – shock poo! – it’s actually Clayface! Same story structure here.

He’s just not that great a character and his origin is even less interesting. LIke every other kid, he wanted to be thought of as cool, he wanted the ladies, and he thought acting was a shortcut to fame and fortune. None of that happens until he snorts magic clay that the Penguin got from Contrived Plot Device Land, and suddenly he’s able to look uncannily like the character he’s portraying.

Because that’s what real acting is right? Not bringing the lines to life with your delivery or presence or talent - no, real acting is wearing convincing makeup! Basil goes from being a mediocre actor to a great one just because he is able to look the part. So why do crap actors remain crap with the aid of makeup, costumes, prosthetics and even CGI? Take note, wannabe actors: get really good makeup and you will somehow become the next Daniel Day-Lewis! Clayface’s origin suuuuuucks!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By baby nightsoil on August 12, 2014
Format: Hardcover
Batman The Dark Knight is probably the worst of the Batman titles in the New 52. While the series has consistently featured some of the best artists in the field, the book has also consistently felt meaningless in comparison to titles like Batman; Batman, Inc.; Batman and Robin; Batgirl; Nightwing; Detective Comics.

Like other Batman titles, it is largely defined by the villains it features. Previous volumes included the White Rabbit (a racy item from the imagination of David Finch) and the Mad Hatter. This volume mostly features Clayface and Man-Bat. The Man-Bat story is more relevant to the larger Batman narrative than the Clayface story. The Penguin plays a meaningful role too. He's been an important force in Batman's New 52 life (probably fourth most important villain behind the Court of Owls, the League of Assassins, and the Joker). Hurwitz has some experience writing the Penguin and is good at it. I don't think he's particularly good at writing Batman, Alfred, or Gordon- the dialogue feels forced and cliché- but if I am disappointed by the major dialogue so much, how can I give this book a 4-star review? There's a couple of silent issues in this trade and they really stand out. Batman and Robin had a silent issue after Damian died. I like silent issues, especially when they are used correctly and in this case, spare the reader from some embarrassing examples of why Batman is usually silent.

The art is top notch
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A good story and great artwork. The writers succeeded in creating an emotional attachment to clay face from an individual standpoint. This has not been done since "batman: the animated series". The back and forth banter between Bruce/batman and Alfred is also very well written. This is a good buy for any fan of the dark knight.
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Batman - The Dark Knight Vol. 4: Clay (The New 52)
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