Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Batman: R.I.P. Hardcover – Deluxe Edition, February 10, 2009

3.5 out of 5 stars 165 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle & comiXology
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Deluxe Edition
"Please retry"
$30.75 $8.95

"Deadpool Kills the Marvel Universe"
The "Merc with a Mouth" takes on the entire Marvel Universe in this bestselling graphic novel. Learn more | More popular Deadpool digital comics

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Batman is pushed past the edge of sanity in this spectacular story that mixes icy mind games and passionate outbursts. A club of criminal masterminds, the Black Glove, has an elaborate plot to make Bruce Wayne/Batman self-destruct by convincing him that all his friends and lovers have betrayed him and that his most trusted memories are false. As clever in their scheming as the villains are, however, they have no idea how thorough Batman has been in planning ways to protect his obsessions; consequently, the action is fractured between scenes of what is really happening, what might be happening, what probably isn't happening, etc. This premise gives scriptwriter Morrison and principal artist Daniel a chance to review key episodes and images from the Caped Crime Fighter's long career—including, of course, numerous encounters with the Joker, who's too chaotic to be happy in any organization like the Black Glove, but who struts through the action wielding sardonic humor and two straight razors. Whether Batman winds up (or ever was) totally sane is unresolved, but he's a fascinating protagonist in this sweeping, emotionally draining saga. (Feb.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Having largely abandoned the outré projects (e.g., Doom Patrol, The Invisibles) that made his reputation for chronicling DC’s big superheros, Morrison here gives us the caper that puts the lid over the Caped Crusader. Dr. Simon Hurt, leader of the international criminal associates known as the Black Glove, has devised an elaborate psychological trap for Batman. The scheme succeeds in breaking Batman’s sanity, long established as being dangerously fragile, and leading him to adopt a psychotically violent persona, the Batman of Zur-En-Arrh, who squares off in Arkham Asylum against Dr. Hurt’s new ally, the Joker. Batman’s delusions are likely to be as confusing to readers as they are to him. Morrison uses elements from seven decades’ worth of disparate and contradictory versions of the character, and only the most dedicated fans will recognize most of them. Tony Daniel’s art grounds the complex proceedings with clarity and verve. Batman’s apparent demise at the saga’s end leads into an arc in which various would-be successors vie for the right to wear his cowl. --Gordon Flagg
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics; Deluxe edition (February 17, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401220908
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401220907
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 0.6 x 11.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (165 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #134,191 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Grant Morrison is well known for his trippy stories, and this arc is definitely trippy. It rarely fails to entertain and that is the most important things about comics. I'm not going to spoil anything, but let's just say that Morrison draws back to Batman's Silver Age roots for quite a number of plot threads.

The art is quite good, with Tony Daniel doing a good job and Lee Garbett doing a commendable job trying to mimic other artists as a homage to past storylines.

A word of warning though. This story is NOT stand alone (especially the "Last Rites" segments which directly tie into Final Crisis). In fact, one of the common complaints against this particular arc is that it doesn't answer everything. However, when you read this, you need to take into account that Morrison planned a five book story for his Batman run. Batman R.I.P. is only the fourth book (the previous three Morrison books Batman and Son, Resurrection of Ra's Al Ghul, and The Black Glove are highly recommended reading prior to reading this book)and the story isn't wrapped up yet! In fact Morrison will come back to Batman this June to finish out his arc.

This is highly recommended, though remember to take my warning in mind before deciding to purchase.
13 Comments 91 of 107 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Grant Morrison may be the most polarizing of comic book writers out there today. Depending on who you ask, he's can be either revered as the savior of X-Men comics (with his early 00s New X-Men run), or demonized as the destroyer of quality X-Men comics. His stories are always deep, complex, psychedelic, and sometimes too smart for their own good. And that was before Grant admittedly totally changed the way he writes his comics' narratives.

While Final Crisis is probably the prime example of this new, uber-compressed narrative style, Batman: RIP certainly exhibits it in many, many ways. The premise of RIP is, rather than the death of Batman, it is the reconstruction and redefinition of the character. It takes Batman on a journey through his mind and his history and really attempts to show what Batman is, and why Batman is who he is.

Does it succeed? Well, Morrison certainly does do a good job of making the reader feel as though they're apart of this long, disoriented journey with Batman. You go through the pieces never quite sure exactly what's going on, and we certainly don't have a clue what's going to happen next. And for you guys and girls who like that type of writing? Batman: RIP might be considered a great piece of Batman fiction. It really does embody exactly what Morrison strives for in his work. It's every other Grant Morrison story you've read times a thousand.

But personally, I don't that type of writing. I can't handle some mystery in a story, I can handle some confusing and psychedelic happenings, but I found that Morrison went way, way beyond simply telling an "out there" story about Batman, and quickly deteriorated into the realm of nonsensical.
Read more ›
23 Comments 121 of 156 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Contrary to what some folks will tell you, there are plenty of differences between what draws a reader to a good Batman story (or any Batman comics, for that matter) versus some of the other costumed hero tales out there, but most fans can agree on one central premise: what keeps the reader coming back to Batman stories is the fact that, at the core, lies a character who is driven by his own private psychology -- the desire to face evil at his own peril -- over and over and over again. Batman is the real character in this world, and Bruce Wayne is the facade, and the costumed freaks he faces venture into equally treacherous territory with each subsequent outing ... but, in the end, one can't help but ask "at what cost?"

Grant Morrison has finally provided an answer to that central theme that's equally supported and plagued Batman since his inception seven decades ago, and, like any good story, it's been delivered with measured portions of greatness, silliness (these are comic books, after all), pity, and pathos in BATMAN R.I.P., the tale that many media outlets have openly advertised as the final death of Batman, aka Bruce Wayne. I'll save discussing the ending -- a troubling choice, I know, but I'm trying to respect the reader's right to privacy without spoiling anything earth-shaking -- but I will say that it wasn't quite what industry mags and professional reviewers said it would be, not far off the mark, but more than a few feet shy of a fieldgoal, too.

Confused? You should be, because this is Grant Morrison's story -- not Batman's or Bruce Wayne's -- as one writer who's had a pretty solid career delivering the kinds of characters and situations one would expect from a veteran of comic book prose.
Read more ›
Comment 15 of 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Ok, so I haven't read the entirety of Grant Morrison's take on Batman; I have only read "Batman R.I.P." and "Batman and Son"; I read the latter before reading the former. I know that means I've missed some material, and I'm sure that some of my confusion must be due to missing out on some of that material.

That being said, I'm not the only one who's confused; reading the other reviews, I noticed that even those who have read the entirety of Morrison's Batman run are confused, which means the arc within this volume is inherently confusing.

Despite its confusing nature, "Batman R.I.P." is, in my opinion, superior to "Batman and Son" in that it has a more interesting story and better art. However, I also agree with those reviewers who say its portrayal of Batman is polarizing: just wait until you see the Batman of Zur-En-Arrh.

My advice would be to read the entirety of Morrison's arc in order rather than jumping into the middle like I did with this; if I had known beforehand, I would've tried to get it right. Hopefully, if you read it in order you'll understand it better than I did.
2 Comments 3 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Want to discover more products? Check out these pages to see more: superhero novels, comic-trade-paperbacks