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Batman & Robin: Dark Knight Vs. White Knight Hardcover – January 31, 2012


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Product Details

  • Series: Batman & Robin
  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics (January 31, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401233732
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401233730
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 7 x 10.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #486,146 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Gleason knocked my socks off with the exposition of the self-proclaimed White Knight” – Comic Book Resources

“I absolutely cannot wait for Tomasi and Gleason to return to Batman and Robin to continue telling more explosive stories featuring Gotham's new dynamic duo” – IGN

About the Author

Paul Cornell is a British writer best known for his work in television drama as well as Doctor Who fiction and as the creator of one of the Doctor's spin-off companions. His comics work includes Captain Britain and MI-13, Black Widow: Deadly Origin and Dark X-Men, as well as Action Comics, Demon Knights and Saucer Country.

A former DC Comics editor for 15 years, Peter J. Tomasi is the writer of the acclaimed graphic novel Light Brigade and the comic book series Green Lantern Corps and Batman & Robin.

A former cast member on MTV's The Real World, Judd Winick is the writer and illustrator of Barry Ween -- Boy Genius and Pedro and Me, and has written Batman, Catwoman, Outsiders, Green Lantern and much more.  He is the creator of the Cartoon Network series The Life and Times of Juniper Lee. 




From the Trade Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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I didn't enjoy the lighter feel to some of the stories, but the last two stories were entertaining and interesting.
K. Eckert
Very good and engaging story written by Peter Tomasi re-teaming with his Green Lantern Corps illustrator, Patrick Gleason, who does a fine job himself.
Slim Cat
The third story is great as it brings back Jason Todd (Robin #2) as the Red Hood and gives us some back in forth between him and Grayson.
T. Widner

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Slim Cat on February 1, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Grant Morrison finished his run on this series, brought Bruce Wayne back, and was off to continue his Bat-story in another new title, "Batman Inc". But alas, that does not mean the adventures of Dick Grayson as (a) Batman and Damien Wayne as Robin have to end. This compilation contains the last nine issues of the series, 17-25, before the big reboot of September 2011. They are split into three stories, three chapters each, with three different creative teams.

The first story is "The Sum of Her Parts" written by Paul Cornell and illustrated (mostly) by Scott McDaniel. An old flame of Bruce is murdered by a yacht heist gone terribly wrong while her body goes missing. An investigation leads to an enemy who loathes Bruce Wayne and will strike at his "Batmen" to get their message across. A really good story that highlights the differences between Bruce and Dick and how their greatest strengths can become their greatest weaknesses. The artwork was good but could get confusing as to what one is looking at if too many objects overlapped.

The next story, "Tree of Blood", highlights the title of the compilation, Dark Knight, White Knight, as Batman and Robin battle an enemy named the White Knight. Somehow he is connected to people dressing as angels and committing suicide. Very good and engaging story written by Peter Tomasi re-teaming with his Green Lantern Corps illustrator, Patrick Gleason, who does a fine job himself.

The final story, "The Streets Run Red" is written by Judd Winick and illustrated by Greg Tocchini, Guillem March, and a couple other artists. March is the strongest of the bunch. Jason Todd gets a transfer from Arkham Asylum to a regular prison and Batman and Robin want to find out why and stop him.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sam Quixote TOP 1000 REVIEWER on May 30, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This is a collection of three three-issue stories featuring the Dick Grayson Batman/Damien Wayne Robin duo. They tangle with three villains, two new, one old: Una Nemo, a socialite who undergoes a dramatic change in her appearance thwarting a heist; the White Knight, an angelic psycho who is killing relatives of Arkham Asylum's inmates; and finally Jason Todd aka the Red Hood.

I thought the White Knight storyline was pretty good, it was pretty graphic in its murders and also quite striking in its brightness, contrasting the usual Gotham gloom. The Jason Todd storyline was decent as well with Judd Winick returning as writer. Todd's personality is both dark and playful and I actually felt myself rooting for him as he seemed the more interesting character in comparison to Grayson's good-guy Batman. The artwork in this story though was fairly scratchy and poor, like the artist was trying to mimic Andy Kubert and failing.

The Una Nemo character design is just so ridiculous it's difficult to take her seriously. She literally has a giant hole in the centre of her head and yet is somehow alive. It's perfectly oval, it hasn't damaged the structure of her skull or thought processes, and it looks so, so silly.

The storylines are alright, it's Batman and Robin taking down villains that don't add up to a larger storyline. In that sense it's good to see contained stories like this. On the other hand, the stories themselves weren't that amazing and ultimately felt a bit unsubstantial compared to the intense and inventive Grant Morrison books. It'd be nice to see Winick return to write a full length storyline with Jason Todd, otherwise "Dark Knight vs. White Knight" is your standard Batman/Robin book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Jordan on March 21, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This fourth installment of Dick Grayon's Batman and Damien Wayne's Robin takes a step back from the Batman mythos and instead focuses on two seemingly self-contained detective stories and the continuation of Jason Todd's relationship with the alternative Dynamic Duo. The eponymous White Knight is particularly engaging. The character has a great look and a great back story that neatly links him to Batman's rogue's gallery. Absence, a former ex-girlfriend of Bruce Wayne's turned villain, is less effective but still worthwhile and I'd certainly like to see more of her. The return of Bruce Wayne has meant that Batman & Robin has become less essential, but this compilation is still worth a look thanks to the well-crafted stories and the beautiful artwork.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By K. Eckert on March 18, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I got a copy of this from the publisher for review through Goodreads First Reads program. I haven't read any of the more recent Batman comics, so I wasn't sure what to expect. This was an interesting collection of stories; it features Dick Grayson as Batman and Damian Wayne as Robin. The stories range from good to kind of confusing.

The first story is "The Sum of Her Parts" I though this story was hard to follow and confusing. It was about an old flame of Bruce Wayne's who went a bit crazy and is trying to kill, but not kill, Batman. I didn't enjoy it all that much and was happy when I was done. The illustration was so-so, at times it was tough to tell exactly what was going on.

The second story is "Tree of Blood" this was about a crazy light-wielding villain who is bent on destroying all the surviving family members of anyone who has been or is in Arkham Asylum. I enjoyed this story a lot more; a great villain, some great action, and wonderful illustration. It was much darker in tone and had some really beautiful detail in the illustration.

The third story is called "The Streets Run Red" and is about the return of the Red Hood. I also enjoyed this story a lot; there was some great action, some wonderful characters, and a very fun story. The illustration was more stylized than the previous two stories, but still very well done and it matched the tone of the story nicely. This is another lighter story.

The stories in general have a more jaunty feel to them then some of the previous Batman comics I have read; Dick Grayson even jokes that he is a comic Batman in the first story. I like the dark aspect to Batman and so I missed that in these stories. Definitely recommended for older readers; lots of torture/murder/violence etc.
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