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152 of 161 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fox did the Caped Crusader proud
The key things to know about the DVD are:
1) The colors jump off the screen, it is a great transfer
2) The featurette with Adam West (Batman) and Burt Ward (Robin) is good, though they cover a lot of the same ground in the commentary
3) The Batmobile feature is very cool
4) The commentary is awesome. Adam and Burt have a great chemistry and really seem...
Published on September 7, 2001 by Christoph B. Gondek

versus
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars High-Camp Revival
"Batman" (1966) remains nostalgic, colorful fun with Adam West and Burt Ward as the satiric Dynamic Duo. The villains and Bat-gadgets are given a more generous budget while the production design is quite impressive. The DVD special edition features a beautiful widescreen transfer and loads of extras - not to mention an enjoyable audio commentary by Adam and Burt. It's...
Published on March 19, 2005 by Scott T. Rivers


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152 of 161 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fox did the Caped Crusader proud, September 7, 2001
This review is from: Batman - The Movie (DVD)
The key things to know about the DVD are:
1) The colors jump off the screen, it is a great transfer
2) The featurette with Adam West (Batman) and Burt Ward (Robin) is good, though they cover a lot of the same ground in the commentary
3) The Batmobile feature is very cool
4) The commentary is awesome. Adam and Burt have a great chemistry and really seem to love both the movie and the show. Their tongues are firmly in their cheeks druing the commentary (Adam West's views on Bruce Wayne alone are worth the price of admission), but you will learn about the production and such secrets as:
Why did ABC tear down the Batcave so quickly after cancellation?
What did Burt Ward really think about the BatCycle?
How and why did Lee Meriweather get to play Catwoman?
Why did Adam and Burt have to spend two hours each week getting oxygen at the Fox infirmary?
The team at Fox had a lot of love for this movie and it shows. Buy this DVD and get Fox to release some series episodes with Adam, Burt, Julie Newmar (Catwoman) and Frank Gorshin (Riddler)doing commentary!
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73 of 79 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Before Nolan, Before Schumacher, Before Burton, There Was...Martinson?, October 5, 2005
By 
Anthony Nasti "Tony" (Staten Island, New York United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Batman - The Movie (DVD)
Who knew that the campy 1960s' take on the dark superhero Batman would age so well? 39 years later, "Batman: The Movie" still is wholly enjoyable even for the most adrent Batman fan.

The plot of the film is paperthin. Batman (Adam West) and his sidekick, Robin (Burt Ward), are out to thwart the four most dangerous villians in Gotham: Catwoman (Lee Meriwehter), The Joker (Cesar Romero), The Penguin (Burgess Meredith) and The Riddler (Frank Gorshin, who recently left us, sadly) from taking over Gotham. To lure Batman into a trap, they kidnap Batman's secret identity, Bruce Wayne. This is more or less all the plot there is. There's also somehing about destroying people with a dehyrdator, but other than that, there's no real plot. And that's the film's charm.

It's a great piece of 1960s' nostalgia. The "holy (insert random word or phrase here), Batman" schtick is still hilarious, and the cast is clearly enjoying themselves. The extras for the dvd are surpisingly enjoyable. The commentary is awesome and the other extras deliver, but it's the movie that is really worth watching.
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42 of 45 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars They may be drunks Robin..but they're human beings as well!, April 4, 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Batman - The Movie (DVD)
I bought this for my 3 year old son but it turns out i enjoy it almost as much as he does. Almost.
I remember watching this as a kid and I never realized how corny it was. Untill now. Yikes! I haven't laughed so hard at a movie in years. This film is funnier than than our best comedies. How can one not burst out in tears as batman is savagely attacked by a rubber shark? Check out his face as he grimaces in pain as the foam rubber teeth clamp down. And then theres the morality. Its good to know that even though drinkers may be riff-raff according to Robin, Batman still considers them human beings. And worth saving. Even the 'Human flotsam' near the end of the film is worth saving. And check out the deep blue sea in the submarine scenes. Whats that in the backround? Is the very horizon rippling before my eyes? Is it a rift in time! Or is it a screen painted with clouds and seaguls gently billowing from a stage fan! It just goes on and on. Poor sets, cheesy diologue coupled with cheesy delivery of cheesy diologue, props to make ILM green with envy. This movie makes those Godzilla movies look like big blockbuster bonanzas.
But all that corn wouldnt make a cornfield without Adam West and Burt Ward. How could a casting be so perfect? These two bring a sincerity to the roles. They somehow say ther lines with straight faces and are into their roles. This isnt a joke to them. its business. At the time anyway. The commentary track is amusing as the two laugh their way through the film with the rest of us. truly, this is a rare film that can be enjoyed by young and old alike. Harmless fun.
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50 of 56 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 'Inspired a generation of comic book readers!, October 23, 2005
This review is from: Batman - The Movie (DVD)
I'm old enough to recall the 1966 previews, aired on ABC, for a mid-season replacement series based on the longstanding comic hero, "Batman". The trailer just hinted at what the show was about: a masked crime fighter, driving a souped-up car unlike anything coming out of Detroit, and a mystique that served to pique interest in the series.

But, when the show hit, it hit BIG! Wednesday and Thursday nights were its domain, having hold on the 7:30 - 8:00 time period for two of its three years aired.

This disc is the film adaptation of the series, made during the first year hiatus, as explained by stars Adam West and Burt Ward in the DVD's commentary. The movie features the same supporting cast, as did the series (Neil Hamilton as "Commissioner Gordon," Stafford Repp as "Chief O'Hara," and Alan Napier as devoted manservant "Alfred"). Also rounding out the cast are frequent "guest villains" Frank Gorshin ("The Riddler"), Caesar Romero ("The Joker"), Burgess Meredith ("The Penguin") and new "Catwoman" Lee Meriweather, who replaced Julie Newmar, unavailable due to previous theatrical commitments.

The movie also has the series' trademark comic book action "sounds" ("POW!" "BANG!" "ZOWIE!" et. al.), the gaudy colors (brought to life in vivid Technicolor), the crazy sound effects, and the tongue-in-cheek dialogue and winks that made the show so cool.

Speaking of the color, I couldn't help but be taken as to how great the set pieces look, even those "recycled" from other shows filmed on the Fox lot. As one whose household didn't get a color set until after the show's end, this DVD allows me to see what I had been missing. Granted, I did have the View Master reel set of the show but it was just an "appetizer" to how "Batman" really looked on screen.

Best of the DVD extras is a four-minute "visit" with George Barris, the designer of The Batmobile. It's not long on info, but any chance to look at what is perhaps the best "ride" to come across the big or small screen is cause for celebration.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Only BATMAN Movie That Matters..., September 24, 2012
By 
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If you grew up in the 60s like I did, then you likely tuned in to the Batman TV series twice a week. In my estimation Adam West and Burt Ward portrayed the only Batman and Robin that matters. The series was chocked full of arch enemies, camp, humor, wit, vivid color, killer fight scenes w/words such as... POW, WHAM, ZOW, BAM... seemingly coming at you thru your TV screen, a wonderful Batcave set with all the bells and whistles including, but not limited to the "Giant Lucite Map of Gotham City." And the series featured, of course, the only Batmobile that matters. If you loved the series... then Batman: The Movie is no disapointment. It has all the same wonderful qualities as the series... the only difference... it runs 105 minutes... and is seen in 1.85:1 widescreen. Now it comes at you on DVD in Brilliant Blue Ray which brings out those vivid colors even more. I've never seen the Batmobile, so sharp, the Batcave so crisp and clear. An entirely NEW viewing experience for a 46-year-old film. And the extras on the Blue Ray version are BATastic! You will get a close-up interactive tour of the Batmobile from nearly every angle. It's almost as if you're opening the door to the real Batmobile and sitting inside. There are several other extra features as well.
I love everything Batman... including the newer darker Batman films, but I do not compare them to the TV series or the film from 1966. It's kinda like comparing apples to oranges.
But because they played a huge part of my childhood... Adam, and Burt's Batman and Robin are my favorites... and Batman: the Movie (1966) is the only BATMAN Movie that matters.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Some days you just can't get rid of a bomb..., December 20, 2001
I admit that this review is entirely biased, myself being a huge fan of the 1960's Batman television series. Anyone who is less than a hardcore fan will likely be either bored, disgusted, or render utterly apathetic by the film's conclusion. Granted, the complete lack of any sort of character development or serious plot developments does tend to grate on the length of the film - only 90 minutes, but seems like ages as the Dynamic Duo sprint from escapade to escapade. For the fan, however, the movie is a near-perfect representation of the series. Gratuitously campy? Certainly. Ridiculously buffoonish dialogue? Of course. Who would have it any other way? The Boy Wonder and Caped Crusader do an admirable job of acting (for their parts, that is), and, although Julie Newmar is disappointingly absent, the Rogues Gallery of Villains (Villains? There were others? Admit it, you spent the whole time staring at Newmar's replacement, Lee Meriweather, as Catwoman), stacked with original series actors Burgess Meredith, Caesar Romero and Frank Gorshin, is superb in their comic evil. Really 3.5 stars due to its inacessability to non-Batman-addicts, the movie is still very enjoyable to hardcore fans of the original series.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars To the Batmobile!, February 19, 2000
By A Customer
Forget Keaton, forget Kilmer and forget Clooney! There was only one man fit to wear the hallowed cowl of the caped crusader. He wasn't available so they got Adam West instead! This is one of the happiest memories of Saturday morning TV, and it hasn't lost its pantomime humour in all these years. Featuring four of Batman's greatest enemys in one madcap bid for world domination, expertly overplayed by all concerned, and a fantastic score by Nelson Riddle (terrific opening music, differs from the familiar T.V. theme!). It seems that nowadays Batman takes himself too seriously and as a result I lost interest in the recent movie exploits. Tongue in cheek wins everytime! Pow! Splat! Crunch!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Batman Fights For Comedic Near-Perfection - And Succeeds, July 30, 1999
I know, Batman purists still cringe at this blasphemy - turning Batman into a comedic character and doing likewise to his universe. As a fan of the 1990s Warner Brothers cartoons and all of their chilling, serious power, I understand those who condemn the deliberately campy William Dozier-produced series from the 1960s.

But I don't particularly care, for the series and this theatrical story from late August of 1966 bring out much-needed laughter. The feature film uses a larger budget and bigger production values than the show and also brings out some of the continuity's funniest moments. Adam West, Burt Ward, and The Rogue's Gallery Of Villains (Ceaser Romero's Joker, Frank Gorshin's Riddler, Burgess Meredith's Penguin, and Lee Meriwether subbing for Julie Newmar as Catwoman/Ms Kitka) engage in deliciously campy performances (I especially liked West's stunned cry, "Confound it! The batteries are dead!" in his reverse-polarizer device) amid nonstop visual and verbal puns (the superimposed comic-book descriptions of punches and blows; the discovery that a Navy submarine was sold to a P.N. Guin), clever action gags, and some genuinely surprising twists. The best twist comes when Bruce Wayne and Ms. Kitka are kidnapped; Bruce urges Kitka to find a switch on his watch that will summon Batman. The other villains grab Bruce and untie him to find the device, but it's just a setup; Bruce uses the opportunity to beat the heck out of the three mugs and make good his escape.

This in turn leads to the film's drop-dead funniest bit; returning to the boardwalk bar and grill where he was held, Batman finds a huge bomb, and runs himself ragged trying to find a safe place to dispose of it; everywhere there are nuns, necking couples, a hilariously idiotic band, ducklings, etc., which eventually drive Batman to mutter, "Some days you just can't get rid of a bomb!" One is hard pressed to stop laughing.

Another genuinely surprising twist directly follows and is part of the film's main plot - the villains have seized a device than can "dehydrate" people into dust, and then rehydrate them. Five thugs are thus turned to dust and Penquin, disguised as a missing seaman in charge of the device, Commodore Schmidlap, offers himself to Batman and Robin. Knowing he is the Penguin, they knock him out and take him to the Batcave. There he "gets a drink of water" - cover to fill the machine with water to rehydrate the thugs. The water used, however, is radioactive water used in the Batcave's nuclear pile, so when the five thugs are rehydrated, they disintegrate upon the slightest touch. Batman's comment on the foolishness of tampering with the laws of nature is genuinely moving. He then pretends that Penguin really is Commodore Schmidlap, hypnotized by the villains to attempt such an ambush; the sham is so Penguin will steal the Batmobile and lead our heroes to the real hideout and the real target of their criminal conspiracy.

To The Batcave! We've not a moment to lose in this terrifically funny superhero adventure!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Holy Over-the-top Silliness, Batman!!!!, September 4, 2001
By 
Hazen B Markoe (St. Paul, MN United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Batman - The Movie (DVD)
Of course, die-hard and overly serious comic fans will cringe at the campy version of the Batman character that carried on the TV airwaves in the 60's, and BATMAN - THE MOVIE was created after that first season to cash in on the popular wave that the show made. Nevertheless, it was silly, over-the-top fun and was a one-of-a-kind cultural event. The movie, of course, covers the adventures of Batman (Adam West) and Robin (Burt Ward) as they try to stop 4 sinister bad guys from holding the world hostage, through a bizarre kidnap plot, which involves turning a fictional UN Security Council to dust piles!! (I know...it sounds goofy...but that was the charm of this show.) West and Ward are solid as the dead-pan Batman and the gee-whiz Boy Wonder respectively. Burgess Meredith is a treat as the Penguin. Caesar Romero is a cackling Joker. Frank Gorshin is an intense Riddler, while Lee Meriwether is a sultry Catwoman. Puns, goofy props, and the hammiest acting this side of melodrama reign in this film. The DVD also has a nice featurette, a tour of the Batmobile, and amusing commentary by both West and Ward. If you enjoyed the series or are a fan of 60's nostalgia, this film is definitely your cup of tea.....or should I say bat-cup of bat-tea?
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars HOLY TODDLER NIRVANA!, July 27, 2005
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This review is from: Batman - The Movie (DVD)
I have now seen this movie maybe fifty times and still counting. My four-year-old son is ADDICTED to Batman, the Batcopter, the Batcycle, the Penguin's sub, etc. With the bigger-than-TV movie budget that allowed for these toys plus the presence of four bat villains, this is a must for fans of the BATMAN TV series. Adults will also appreciate -- perhaps after repeated viewings -- director Les Martinson's adept staging in long, well-timed comic takes among the villains. The bad guys are expert actors all, with relative novice Lee Meriweather (subbing for Julie Newmar, who was shooting McKENNA'S GOLD during the hiatus) acquitting herself admirably as a comedic villain. And does she look an ABSOLUTE KNOCKOUT as both Catwoman and as Russian Cold War hottie, Miss Kitka. Adam West certainly owns this incarnation of Batman, and wait 'til you hear how Burt Ward got the part of Robin! Kudos also to Nelson Riddle's jazz score, which I finally felt compelled to seek out (and found!) as a CD. Of course, we listen to this in the car all the time, and I have yet to get bored with the paradoxical variety of tonal colors despite the narrow instrumentation for jazz band. The script by Lorenzo Semple Jr. who wrote all? most? much? of the first season is slyly funny and supports both goofiness and a coherent narrative. Basically, it's fun, nostalgic, and a great take on -- and execution of -- the material. The commentaries from Adam West and Burt Ward are a little spare on info, but still welcome, as is the extra feature about the Batmobile. In all, a near PURRRR-fect DVD, and a cheap guilty pleasure at a relatively low price.
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Batman - The Movie
Batman - The Movie by Leslie H. Martinson (DVD - 2001)
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