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Batman: Through the Looking Glass Hardcover – January 17, 2012

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"Batman Vol. 7: Endgame"
Celebrate "Batman Day" on Sept. 26th with a selection of great Batman-related graphic novels.

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Bruce Jones is a renowned comics writer (and sometime illustrator) whose best known work includes a lengthy run on Marvel's INCREDIBLE HULK. He also wrote Marvel's CONAN THE BARBARIAN and KA-ZAR, the graphic novel mystery series SOMERSET HOLMES, and dozens of short horror and science fiction stories for Warren Publications' CREEPY and EERIE magazines.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Product Details

  • Series: Batman
  • Hardcover: 112 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics; 1St Edition edition (January 17, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401225535
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401225537
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 0.6 x 10.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,149,038 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

BRUCE JONES is the author/artist of nine previous novels including (under the pseudonym Bruce Elliot) the bestselling STILL LIFE, plus numerous screenplays, teleplays and graphic novels. Jones won the Upcoming Author of the Year award from the Bertelsman Book Club. He lives with his wife, novelist and screenwriter April Campbell Jones, and their dogs Pete and Lily. The Joneses spend their time in the ethers between Los Angeles and the Midwest.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Anarchy in the US on January 17, 2012
Format: Hardcover
While every super-hero has one origin story, technically super villains have two origins. The first origin is how they got to becoming a villain, similar to the hero, but...the second origin is how the villain first met/fought the hero. In the batman rouges gallery, Batman: The Man Who Laughs is one of the few stories on the market that focus entirely on the villain first meeting the hero. But while there is a Joker story for every situation, The Mad Hatter is not the most sought after or well known Bat villain out there. So seeing an entire introduction for a lower-named Bat villain is a welcome change in my opinion.

BATMAN: THOUGH THE LOOKING GLASS starts out with Batman in the bat-cave conversing with Alfred about a party he went to the previous night out at the Mayor's Hall. While deducing the oddness of the event, Batman is having headaches while reading about the possible murder of Dunphrey Tweedle in the newspaper (for those not keen on the lesser Bat villains, Dunphrey Tweedle is the brother of Denham, both of which are Tweedledum and Tweedledee). And just like that, a talking white rabbit in a coat comes running along, and heads down a rabbit hole (sewage tunnel). Alfred doesn't see it and Batman is confused, but even more so when a childhood friend of his 20 years ago is right in front of his eyes, Celia, and looks just like she did 20 years ago. But oddly enough, she's called and dressed just like "Alice", and yet Alfred can't see her either! Is Celia a hallucination of a drug? Or is Batman just going crazy? Either way, Celia and Batman head down into the rabbit hole to start the investigation of a murder case.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By alexanderIII on March 19, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm a fan of both Batman and Alice in Wonderland, which is why I enjoyed this zany, weird story. But obviously, not everyone will. Why? Because it's not really a Batman story. Sure, it has Batman in it, but it's much more of a Wonderland tale.

I enjoyed the visuals, and creativity of this comic. But that's also because I really enjoy art.

I was drawn to this tale with the hope that it would feature largely The Mad Hatter. Unfortunately, it does not. He's not much of a factor in it, though a unique interpretation of him is in it.

You will also enjoy this comic if you are a fan of Batman, Alice in Wonderland, art, creativity, weirdness, and imagination. If you just want a Batman story, look elsewhere. But this is a great piece of 'art' nonetheless.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By D. Wisdom on April 14, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a well written murder mystery. I like my Batman as varied as I can get him. If some reviewers had their way, every Batman story would be roughly the same, with little deviation from the norm. The artwork here is the key to this book's appeal. I understand that it's different, over the top, even cartoonish, but that's what I love about it. If I were Batman, I would want all my drug induced hallucinations to look and feel just as Sam Keith presents here. If you abhor the surreal, this book is not for you. If you enjoy beautiful art and revel in fun deviations from the norm, then you'll appreciate this book. With an open mind, you might even have a good time reading it.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By April Campbell Jones on February 6, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Anyone who thinks this is a Batman story is mistaken. Nor is it a story of the origins of the Mad Hatter as a villian. Instead, it is one of the cleverest parodies ever written of Alice in Wonderland, and while the artwork is unusual and sometimes even freakish, the story is filled with Alice references and puzzles and the plot is intriguing as well as original.

Buy it, simply because it's bound to become a collector's item! Both Bruce Jones and Sam Kieth are in top form.
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Format: Hardcover
I’m not sure when or even why Lewis Carroll came to be so closely associated with Batman but today there’s a very strong Wonderland presence in Gotham thanks to the character of Jervis Tetch aka The Mad Hatter. To be fair to ol’ Jervy, he’s had his moments. In New 52 The Dark Knight Vol 3: Mad, we got an enthralling Hatter origin and a thrilling Batman tale, and his part of the Arkham City video game was easily one of its highlights, not to mention quite atmospheric.

Then there’s Batman: Through the Looking Glass from Bruce Jones and Sam Kieth which is disposable junk!

Batman gets accidentally dosed with hallucinogenic tea and is sucked into a Wonderland adventure where he encounters characters from Carroll’s classic sequel, Through the Looking Glass. The twist is that the characters, though visually similar to Carroll’s creations, represent “real” figures in Gotham society and a murder mystery begins that Batman and “Alice” have to solve.

Our Alice facsimile is Celia, a childhood friend of Bruce’s who died young. I vaguely recall seeing a girl friend of Bruce’s in other stories of his youth and it might be Celia but it’s more than a little contrived to have her be this incredibly powerful figure in his psyche all of a sudden. Her presence instantly changes his personality to make him desperately clingy to her thus ensuring the two follow each other everywhere and the book can happen. How convenient!

While Jones’ script is a stinker, Sam Kieth is a good fit as the artist on this book. His swirling, fluid art style worked beautifully in The Maxx, another trippy, fantasy comic that blurs the lines between reality and fiction, and stars a big bruiser of a man alongside a waif of a girl. And as Batman’s been drugged, the warped look is appropriate.
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